Tulle

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Tulle

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Tulle

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Tulle

8 Name results for Tulle

5 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Cotter, Patrick, 1659-1721, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1116
  • Person
  • 15 August 1659-18 June 1721

Born: 15 August 1659, County Cork
Entered: 14 September 1681, Toulouse, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)
Ordained: 1690, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1697
Died: 18 June 1721, Tulle, Limousin, Aquitaine, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1688-1692 Studies Theology, first at Bordeaux then at Poitiers
1693 at College of Saintes AQUIT teaching Humanities and Grammar
1695 at College Périgord, teaching Humanities, Logic and Physics
1696 Tertianship at Bordeaux
1699 at Agen College teaching Logic
1699-1721 at Tulle College Spiritual Father, Teaching Casuistics
Never returned to Ireland. Gentle, prudent clear judgement excellent teacher and administrator

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Philosophy before Ent 1681 Toulouse
After First Vows he spent five years Regency in TOLO Colleges, and then Transcribed to AQUIT
He resumed studies at Bordeaux but completed them at Poitiers, where he was Ordained 1690
He then returned to teach at Humanities at AQUIT Colleges
1686-1699 Sent to hold a Chair of Philosophy at Périgord and then later at Agen
1699 He volunteered to come to the Irish Mission, but he was sent as Spiritual Director and Professor of Theology to Tulle and spent twenty two years there. He became a noted Preacher and died at Tulle 18 June 1721
Contemporary documents speak of his ability for teaching and governing as well as his success in Preaching and Spiritual Direction

Dillon de Coughlan, Joseph, 1669-1737, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1185
  • Person
  • 19 March 1669-01 January 1737

Born: 19 March 1669, Athlone, County Westmeath
Entered: 14 January 1687, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1698, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 16 March 1704
Died: 01 January 1737, Limoges, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1689 First Vows 15 January 1689
1693-1694 at Tulles College AQUIT
1695 Teaching Rhetoric at Nantes College AQUIT
1696 Teaching Rhetoric at La Rochelle College AQUIT
1700 Teaching Rhetoric at Poitiers
1703 Teaching Philosophy at La Rochelle
1705 Teaching at Tulles and FV
1711 At Agen College teaching and Preaching. Prefect of the School
1714 At Limoges College
1717 At Bordeaux College
1722-1723 Minister of Irish College Poitiers

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had started Philosophy before Ent 14 January 1687 Bordeaux
1689-1690 After First Vows he was sent to Philosophy to Pau
1690-1696 He was sent for six years of Regency at Tulle, Saintes and La Rochelle. He then studied Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and was Ordained there in 1698
Towards the end of his Tertianship, he asked the General to serve on the Irish Mission. The General was concerned about the political state of the country and so was not inclined to send him there. A little later the General relented, but at that time the Mission Superior did not want any new arrivals, as he believed it might jeopardise the work and lives of those already there.
In AQUIT he had a distinguished career as Professor and later a Missioner.
1722-1723 Minister at Poitiers
Died at Limoges 1727

Manby, John, 1675-1749, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1668
  • Person
  • 01 August 1675-04 October 1749

Born: 01 August 1675, County Derry
Entered: 06 December 1690, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1703, Poitiers, France
Final Vows 1711
Died: 04 October 1749, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Was older brother of Peter Manby - RIP 1752

“Was brother of Peter Manby SJ and a far superior man”
First Vows at Pau 07 December 1692
1694 At Pau College AQUIT studying Logic
1695 At Périgord teaching Grammar
1698 At Tulles College teaching Humanities
1699 James (recte John) At Fontenoy teaching Rhetoric
1700-1723 At Poitiers teaching Humanities, Rhetoric. Subtle intellect, fit to teach Sciences. Acute cultivated mind. Taught at “Magno” College” too
1723 At Bordeaux College teaching Humanities
1730 At Poitiers Infirmus
“John Maachy” (recte John Manby?) 04 October 1749

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Peter (Dean of Derry an afterwards received into the Church). Older brother of Peter
1692-1694 After First Vows he studied Philosophy at Pau
1694-1699 He was sent for Regency at Périgueux, Tulle and Fontenoy, before continuing Philosophy and then studying Theology, both at Grand Collège Poitiers, where he was Ordained
1703 He was sent to teach Humanities at Poitiers, except for two years at La Rochelle.
He died at Poitiers between 1746 and 1749

McGrath, John Xavier, 1702-1755, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1714
  • Person
  • 14 February 1702-25 November 1755

Born: 14 February 1702, Shanakill, Rathgormack, County Waterford
Entered: 12 November 1721, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: c 1732/3, Poitiers, France
Died: 25 November 1755, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1723-1727 Taught Grammar and Humanities (at Poitiers?)/ First Vows 17 November 1726
1727 At Tulles teaching Humanities
1729-1733 Studying Theology at Poitiers
1733-1734 Tertianship at Marans AQUIT
1735-1737 Teaching Philosophy at Fontenoy AQUIT
1738-1740 In Ireland
1740-1742 At Poitiers, Minister and teaching
1743 At Luçon N of Rochelle or Limoges
1744-1747 At Fontenoy College Minister
1752-1755 Superior of Cleracensis (Clavacensi) - Clarens, Switzerland

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
He had already studied Philosophy before Ent 12 November 1721 Bordeaux
After First Vows he was sent on Regency to Tulle, Agen, and Angoulême,
1729-1723 He was sent for Theology first for a year at Bordeaux and then to Grand Collège Poitiers where he was Ordained 1732/3
1733-1735 Tertianship at Marennes and then spent a year at Irish College Poitiers
1735-1737 Taught Philosophy at Fontenoy
1737-1739 Sent to Ireland and Limerick Residence
1739-1742 Sent to be Minister at Irish College Poitiers
1742-1751 Sent on various missions as Minister, Operarius and Missioner in various places of AQUIT
1751-1754 Rector of Irish College Poitiers 26 Ocotber 1751
1754 Sent to Bordeaux due to ill health, and he died there 25 November 1755

Morony, Joseph, 1714-1758, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1770
  • Person
  • 19 March 1714-15 July 1785, Dublin

Born: 19 March 1714, Ballykeefe, County Limerick
Entered: 03 September 1734, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1743, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 04 June 1752
Died: 15 July 1785, Dublin - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Taught Humanities 6 years
1736-1738 & 1740-1741 Taught Grammar
1738-1747 Prefect of Boarders, Teaching Rhetoric, Studying Theology at Irish College Poitiers - Minister 1745-1747
1755 At least from this date in Ireland
1761 In Ireland towards end of 1761 (notice sent by Fr Corcoran & notice on an old stone, on which IHS at Limerick and Morony family
“Wonder if 1739-1740 dates are correct as original MS has 1640-1641 & 1639-1640, and the writer is very orderly”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1746-1785 A Writer and a celebrated Preacher in Limerick, Cork, Waterford and Dublin
Taught Humanities, and was Procurator at Poitiers.
1746 & 1756 In Limerick
In his book, printed in 1796, he is said to have been “lately living in Dublin.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Bordeaux before Ent 03 September 1734 Bordeaux
1736-1739 After First Vows he was sent on Regency teaching to Tulle and as Prefect at the Irish College Poitiers.
1739-1741 Sent on two further years of Regency at Agen and Luçon
1741-1746 Sent for Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and he was Ordained there in 1743
1746-1747 Sent to Ireland and spent a year at Clonmel
1747-1773 Sent to Limerick where most of his working life was spent. At Limerick he proved himself not only a successful schoolmaster but enjoyed a high reputation as a Preacher throughout Munster. According to the census of 1766 he conducted his school at Jail Lane, near Athlunkard St.
1773 At the Suppression of the Society, 1773, he closed his school and went to live in Dublin. He was one of the signatories of 7 February, 1774, Accepting the brief of the Suppression. He died in Dublin 15 July 1785
Such was the esteem in which his memory was held as a preacher that eleven years after his death, two volumes of his sermons were published by the aid of the generous subscriptions of his many admirers

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Joseph Moroney SJ 1714-1785
Fr Joseph Moroney was born on March 19th 1714 at Ballykeefe, Mungret, Limerick. He joined the Jesuits at Bordeaux in 1734.

Twelve years later he was sent to Ireland, where he became famous as a preacher, in Limerick, Waterford and Munster in general, but mainly in Limerick. According to a census, he conducted a school at Gaol Lane, Limerick, but on the Suppression of the Society, the school ceased to function in 1783.

He published his sermons in two volumes. They are plain instructions without any evidence of great genius or eloquence, but then he is not the only great orator who reads rather poorly in print.

Fr Moroney ended his days in Dublin where he died in 1785.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note :
Joseph Morony
Those marked with * were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MORONY, JOSEPH,was born at Limerick, on the 19th of March 1714, and joined the Society at Bordeaux, on the 4th of September, 1734. Twelve years later he came to the Mission, and was placed in his native city. On the 28th of June, 1752, he was numbered with the Professed Fathers. F. Joseph Morony became celebrated as a Preacher in Limerick, Waterford, and several parts of the Province of Munster, and left 2 Vols. of discourses printed in Dublin 12mo, 1796. The 1st Vol. contains 260pp : the 2nd 309 pp. A good judge informs me they were solid instructions in a plain stile, but without any evidence of great genius or eloquence. 1 think he died in Dublin.

Born: 19 March 1714, Ballykeefe, County Limerick
Entered: 03 September 1734, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1743, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 04 June 1752
Died: 15 July 1785, Dublin - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Taught Humanities 6 years
1736-1738 & 1740-1741 Taught Grammar
1738-1747 Prefect of Boarders, Teaching Rhetoric, Studying Theology at Irish College Poitiers - Minister 1745-1747
1755 At least from this date in Ireland
1761 In Ireland towards end of 1761 (notice sent by Fr Corcoran & notice on an old stone, on which IHS at Limerick and Morony family
“Wonder if 1739-1740 dates are correct as original MS has 1640-1641 & 1639-1640, and the writer is very orderly”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1746-1785 A Writer and a celebrated Preacher in Limerick, Cork, Waterford and Dublin
Taught Humanities, and was Procurator at Poitiers.
1746 & 1756 In Limerick
In his book, printed in 1796, he is said to have been “lately living in Dublin.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Bordeaux before Ent 03 September 1734 Bordeaux
1736-1739 After First Vows he was sent on Regency teaching to Tulle and as Prefect at the Irish College Poitiers.
1739-1741 Sent on two further years of Regency at Agen and Luçon
1741-1746 Sent for Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and he was Ordained there in 1743
1746-1747 Sent to Ireland and spent a year at Clonmel
1747-1773 Sent to Limerick where most of his working life was spent. At Limerick he proved himself not only a successful schoolmaster but enjoyed a high reputation as a Preacher throughout Munster. According to the census of 1766 he conducted his school at Jail Lane, near Athlunkard St.
1773 At the Suppression of the Society, 1773, he closed his school and went to live in Dublin. He was one of the signatories of 7 February, 1774, Accepting the brief of the Suppression. He died in Dublin 15 July 1785
Such was the esteem in which his memory was held as a preacher that eleven years after his death, two volumes of his sermons were published by the aid of the generous subscriptions of his many admirers

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Joseph Moroney SJ 1714-1785
Fr Joseph Moroney was born on March 19th 1714 at Ballykeefe, Mungret, Limerick. He joined the Jesuits at Bordeaux in 1734.

Twelve years later he was sent to Ireland, where he became famous as a preacher, in Limerick, Waterford and Munster in general, but mainly in Limerick. According to a census, he conducted a school at Gaol Lane, Limerick, but on the Suppression of the Society, the school ceased to function in 1783.

He published his sermons in two volumes. They are plain instructions without any evidence of great genius or eloquence, but then he is not the only great orator who reads rather poorly in print.

Fr Moroney ended his days in Dublin where he died in 1785.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note :
Joseph Morony
Those marked with * were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MORONY, JOSEPH,was born at Limerick, on the 19th of March 1714, and joined the Society at Bordeaux, on the 4th of September, 1734. Twelve years later he came to the Mission, and was placed in his native city. On the 28th of June, 1752, he was numbered with the Professed Fathers. F. Joseph Morony became celebrated as a Preacher in Limerick, Waterford, and several parts of the Province of Munster, and left 2 Vols. of discourses printed in Dublin 12mo, 1796. The 1st Vol. contains 260pp : the 2nd 309 pp. A good judge informs me they were solid instructions in a plain stile, but without any evidence of great genius or eloquence. 1 think he died in Dublin.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

O'Hartegan, Matthew, 1600-1666, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1912
  • Person
  • 1600-02 May 1666

Born: 1600, Limerick
Entered: 08 January 1626, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1633, Bordeaux, France
Final vows: 15 August 1641, Waterford
Died: 02 May 1666, Grand Collège, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Was already a “Jurista”. Had studied 2 years Philosophy and 2 Jurisprudence on Ent
1628 First Vows 09 January 1628
1628-1630 At Pau College AQUIT taught Grammar
1630-1636 At Bordeaux Collège studying Theology, teaching Grammar and Philosophy
1636-1637 Minister at La Rochelle
1637 In Ireland for 4 years
1647-1648 Taught Physics at Bordeaux
1648-1650 At Pau College teaching Philosophy
1650-1651 Minister and Consultor at Périgord Collège; 1651-1652 At Tulle Collège teaching Grammar; 1655-1656 At Poitiers (MIn & Cons)
1656-1657 Superior of Bayonne Mission
1657-1660 At Agen College Consultor and teaching Physics, also a Casuist there
1660-1666 At Poitiers Confessor and later infirmus (Verdier Rector at that time)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
(In Pen) First Vows 09 January 1628; RIP Poitiers 1665 (Sommervogel)
1659 He was probably Superior of the Mission as “Nathaniel Hart” (but this is also ascribed to Richard Shelton, who was Superior of Irish Mission)
He was a much esteemed Agent of the Confederation at the French Court; Prudent, and much liked by the Nuncio in Paris. He had been sent over by the Catholics of Ireland to beg assistance from the King in their distress, the kingdom presenting a scene of general conflagration and bloodshed, the Catholics fighting for freedom of conscience, and their lawful King against the Puritans (Letter of Robert Nugent 24 April 1642). When in Paris the petition of the twenty-five thousand Irish - driven by persecution to St Kitts - arrived. Father Hartegan offered himself as one of two Fathers to be sent for their spiritual relief - Letter of Father Hartegan 30 Marhc 1643 (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
Often mentioned by Nuncio to Ireland Rinuccini
Considered a religious and clever man.
A correspondent of Wadding. Several of his letters are in Carte’s “Ormond” and Mr Gilberty’s works on “Irish History”
He volunteered to help the Irish at St Kitts (cf Foley’s Collectanea).

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already studied Philosophy and Jurisprudence and had graduated MA before Ent 08 January 1626 Bordeaux
1628-1630 After First Vows he was sent on Regency to Agen,
1630-1634 He was then sent to Bordeaux for Theology where he was Ordained 1633
1634-1636 Sent to Pau to teach Philosophy
1636-1637 Sent as Minister at La Rochelle
1637-1642 Sent to Ireland. No record of his work except that he made FV at Waterford 15 August 1641. It may be reasonable to surmise that he was known to the newly constituted “Confederation of Kilkenny”, as he was instructed to represent them the following year in France - the Mission Superior duly notified the General of this business.
1642-1646 Sent to France to take charge of what might be called the Embassy of Ireland in France on behalf of the Supreme Council of the Confederation of Kilkenny. He was at Beziers June 4, Lyon July 15 and settled in Paris as “Agent” August 8th until May 1646 when, having finished or resigned his mission he returned to Bordeaux. He along with Geoffrey Baron (nephew of Luke Wadding OFM) were formally appointed as agents at the French Court.
1646 After he resigned his post, he continued to live in Paris and then moved to Bordeaux. In the course of his court business, he had managed to earn the distrust of Queen Henrietta, wife of Charles I. Letters on the Queen and supposedly written by O’Hartegan were seized and published in London. They were considered a forgery, however they were also used as a favourite weapon of counter-diplomacy, and even the Supreme Council were not convinced that O’Hartegan had written them - the originals of which were never produced.
1648 Two years after his return to Bordeaux, The General Carafa asked the AQUIT Provincial to summon a Meeting of Consultors to choose a priest of their Province to conduct an extraordinary Visitation of the Irish Mission, and O’Hartegan was invited to take part in the consultation. The choice fell on Mercure Verdier, who possibly owed some of his grasp of the political-religious situation in Ireland to O’Hartegan.
He was never to return to Ireland and was sent to teach at various Colleges in AQUIT. he taught Philosophy at Bordeaux (1646-1648), at Pau (1648-1650) and Agen (1657-1660) . He conducted weight AQUIT business at Paris, and briefly was Superior at Bayonne.
1660 He was sent to Grand Collège Poitiers as Operarius, and he died there 02 May 1666

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
O'Hartegan, Matthew
by Aoife Duignan

O'Hartegan, Matthew (1600–66), Jesuit priest and confederate agent, was born in August 1600 in Limerick. Originally intending to pursue a lay career, he studied philosophy and jurisprudence, and was awarded an MA, but subsequently entered the Society of Jesus at Bordeaux on 8 January 1626. After a short period of regency at Agen, he began theological studies at Bordeaux in 1630. He was ordained in spring 1633, and thereafter became professor of philosophy at Pau. He was transferred as minister to the college of La Rochelle in 1636, and at the end of that year was assigned to the Irish mission. There are no records of his term in Ireland, except that he made his solemn profession at Waterford, on 15 August 1641. He acted on behalf of the Catholic Confederate Association in Paris in 1642, and he and Geoffrey Barron (qv) were officially appointed agents to the French court by the supreme council on 23 July 1643. His efforts to ensure the continued support of France and to procure aid involved him in contact with the papal nuncio in France, Grimaldi, Cardinal Mazarin, and Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.

In March 1645 the confederate supreme council expressed concern at a number of letters allegedly written by O'Hartegan, which criticised the influence on the council of Charles I's viceroy, James Butler (qv), marquess of Ormond. Although the council stated that it believed the letters to be forged, O'Hartegan's suitability to act for the association was increasingly called into question, with concerns over his ‘vanitye, and exaltation of himselfe’ and ‘disrespect and scandalous calumnyes by him’ (Gilbert, Ir. confed., iv, 205). He also alienated Henrietta Maria, who doubted the sincerity of his desire for peace.

In regular contact with GianBattista Rinuccini (qv) in Paris, he organised the nuncio's passage to Ireland. Rinuccini discussed the possibility of O'Hartegan's returning to his religious duties in October 1645; he ultimately finished or resigned his agency in Paris in May 1646 and returned to Bordeaux. Despite this, he retained an interest in developments in Ireland, and continued to voice his suspicions about the integrity of royal intentions. The general of the Society of Jesus, Father Caraffa, made a request to the provincial at Bordeaux 1648 to choose a priest for an examination of the Irish mission. O'Hartegan was deeply involved in this process, and the ultimate choice, Mercure Verdier, owed much of his familiarity with the complex politico-religious situation in Ireland to O'Hartegan. However, O'Hartegan was never again recalled to the Irish mission. He held a number of posts in his own province of Aquitaine, including professor of philosophy at Bordeaux (1646–8), and at Pau (1648–50). In the mid 1650s the general of the society expressed concern about the spiritual welfare of Irish inhabitants on the island of St Kitts, prompting O'Hartegan's offer to settle there; however, he does not appear to have gone to the West Indies. He held the professorship of philosophy at Agen 1657–60 and also conducted much weighty business for his province at Paris, briefly acting as superior at Bayonne. In 1660 he was assigned to the Grand College of Poitiers where he served as operarius until his death on 2 May 1666.

Francis Finnegan, ‘A biographical dictionary of Irish Jesuits in the time of the society's third mission, 1598–1773’, Milltown Park MSS, Irish Jesuit Archives, Dublin; G. Aiazzi (ed.), The embassy in Ireland of Monsignor G. B. Rinuccini, archbishop of Fermo, in the years 1645–9, trans. Annie Hutton (1873); Gilbert, Ir. confed., iii, 68–73, 107–9, 186, 233–4, 261; iv, xx–xv, 1, 36–38, 119, 203–6, 377–8; HMC, Report on Franciscan manuscripts preserved at the convent, Merchants' Quay, Dublin (1906), 150, 197, 201, 231; NHI, iii (1976), 598; L. McRedmond, To the greater glory: a history of the Irish Jesuits (1991), 67, 82; J. Lowe (ed.), Clanricarde letter book (1993), 149; Micheál Ó Siochrú, Confederate Ireland, 1642–1649: a constitutional and political analysis (1999), 51, 263

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Mathew O’Hartegan SJ 1600-1666
Fr Matthew O’Hartegan was born in St John’s Parish Limerick, and he entered the Society in 1626.

Together with Frs Michael Chamberlain and Thomas Maguire, he was appointed Chaplain to the Confederate Forces in Ireland in 1642.The same year he was sent by the Confederation of Kilkenny as accredited Irish Agent to the King of France. A great deal of controversy exists as to the success of his mission. At any rate, he was recalled in 1645.

The rest of his life was spent in the Province of Aquitaine, to which he belonged. He died at Poitiers about 1666.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
O’HARTEGAN , MATTHEW. A letter of F. Robert Nugent dated from Ireland, the 24th of April, 1642, shows, that F. Hartegan had just been sent over to France by the Catholic National Association, and the Bishops, to solicit the aid of his Most Christian Majesty. He states that Ireland presented a spectacle of general conflagration and bloodshed, and that the Catholics were fighting for freedom of conscience, for their legitimate King, and for their country, against the Puritans. F. Hartegan during the year he spent in this negotiation displayed much ardour; but his success was not equal to his expectations. This may have been owing to the extreme illness of Cardinal Richlieu. Another object was then taken up in Letter keeping with his religious profession. I learn from his own letter, dated Paris, the 30th of March, 1643, that Pere Jordan Forrestier, the Procurator of the Provinces of France, had placed in his hands on the 25th of March, the petition of 25,000 Irishmen, who by the persecution and iniquity of the times had been forced to expatriate themselves, and settle in St. Kitts, and the adjoining isles. Their petition had been brought over by the French Admiral Du Poenry, who backed their petition for two Irish Jesuits to be sent to them to administer the consolations of Religion to their destitute and afflicted countrymen. F. Hartegan offered himself for this Mission, and represented his vigour of constitution, his knowledge of the Irish, English, and French languages, and his vehement desire of labouring in this or any other similar Mission. Probably his wish was granted, for afterwards he disappears altogether.

Plunkett, Thomas, 1627-1697, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1992
  • Person
  • 1627-26 February 1697

Born: 1627, Dublin
Entered: 11 November 1647, Kilkenny
Ordained: c 1654, Bordeaux, France
Died: 26 February 1697, Dublin Residence, Dublin

1650-1653 Studied Theology at Bordeaux (1651 Age 25 Soc 3 - had good talent and proficiency more than mediocre. Fit to teach Grammar and Philosophy, and above mediocre in Theology)
1653-1654 Studied Theology at Poitiers
1654-1655 Taught Grammar ad Philosophy at La Rochelle
1655 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar
1656-1660 At La Rochelle, now a priest, Age 31 teaching Grammar
1660-1661 At Angoulême
1661-1662 At Agen
1663 Teaching 2nd Class at Bordeaux
1665 At Tulles Age 36
1666-1667 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar
1667-1669 At Loudun Operarius
1670 Goes to Ireland or from 1669

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1650 Sent for Theology to AQUIT

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
He had already completed his Philosophy studies before Ent 11 November 1647 Kilkenny
After First Vows was sent to Bordeaux for studies and was Ordained there c 1654
1655-1667 For the next twelve years he taught at various AQUIT Colleges and was an Operarius until he was sent to Ireland
1669 Sent to Ireland and Dublin, where he worked mostly outside the city until after the Oates Plot. He died at the Dublin Residence 27 February 1697 and was buried at the St. Catherine's churchyard

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
PLUNKETT, THOMAS. Began his Noviceship at Kilkenny. After taking the simple Vows he was sent, as I find in F. John Young’s letter, dated Galway, April 20th, 1650, with Daniel Dowgan, or Dugan, to the Province of Aquitaine, to study Theology. From that time until the announcement of his death in Dublin, on 26th February, 1697, I can learn nothing of his Biography.

Wesley, John, 1662-1721, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2238
  • Person
  • 06 March 1662-20 March 1721

Born: 06 March 1662, County Kildare
Entered: 07 September 1682, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1691, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1700
Died: 20 March 1721, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Studied Philosophy and Theology 7 years in Society
1689-1694 At Irish College Poitiers studying Theology
1694-1695 At Bordeaux on Tertianship
1695-1696 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar - had a talent for Mathematics and History
1697-1698 At Tulles teaching Logic and Physics. Consultor.
1698-1705 At La Rochelle teaching Grammar and Operarius. Prefect of studied and Casuist (1702-1703) and Professor of Lower Schools
1705-1709 At Irish College Poitiers, Minister and Procurator
1711-1716 At La Rochelle, prefect and teaching Humanities, Philosophy and Moral Theology
1717-1718 At Irish College Poitiers
1718-1720 At Fontenoy College, Prefect and again at Poitiers as Minister
1720-1721 At Irish College Poitiers teaching Grammar, Humanities and Philosophy. Prefect of Higher School. Has good judgement and is modest and grave. Tenacious of his own opinion

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica”
There are two very similar Entries (1) John Clare and (2) John Wesley - which follow one another
(1) John Clare
DOB 1662 Kilkenny; Ent 07 September 1682; RIP post 1685
Mentioned in ANG Catalogue 1685 (when he was in Liège, which was ANG, where Wesley was); Left Ireland in 1684
(1) John Wesley
DOB 1662 Leinster; Ent 07 September 1682; RIP post 1717
Professor of Philosophy
1708 Procurator of Irish College Poitiers (in pencil)
1717 At Irish College Poitiers
Mentioned in ANG Catalogue 1685 (when he was in Liège, which was ANG, and Clare is said to be the same) and is called “Wisely, a Kildare name, and the dates 1660 and 07 September 1683 are given (presumably as DOB and Ent?)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1684-1692 After First Vows he was sent for studies to Liège and then Grand Collège Poitiers (AQUIT) where he was Ordained 1691
1692-1696 After studies were completed he made Tertianship, and was then sent to teach Humanities at Fontenay.
1696-1698 He was sent to teach Philosophy at Tulle.
1698-1706 He was then appointed Prefect of Studies at la Rochelle
1706-1710 He was then sent as Procurator to Irish College Poitiers
1710-1716 He was sent back to La Rochelle as Prefect of Studies.
1716 He was sent as Minister to Irish College Poitiers, and he died there 20 March 1721
Wesley always kept up an interest in the Irish Mission. And from the cryptic correspondence of the period we can deduce that he had come into an inheritance which he wished to be devoted to a Jesuit mission in Kildare. But in 1708 the time was not appropriate for such a venture.