Dublin residence (Jesuit)

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Dublin residence (Jesuit)

Dublin residence (Jesuit)

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Dublin residence (Jesuit)

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Dublin residence (Jesuit)

49 Name results for Dublin residence (Jesuit)

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Aylmer, Charles, 1786-1849, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/470
  • Person
  • 29 August 1786-04 July 1849

Born: 29 August 1786, Painestown, County Kildare
Entered: 21 May 1808, Hodder, Stonyhurst, England - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: Palermo, Sicily
Final vows: 16 January 1820
Died: 04 July 1849, St Francis Xavier, Gardiner St, Dublin

Superior of the Mission : 1819

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Charles. His brother William was an Officer in the Austrian Cuirassiers, and considered one of the best swordsmen in the service.
1814 He studied at Stonyhurst and Palermo, graduating DD there.
1816 Superior Dublin Residence, and again in 1822 and 1841
1817 Rector at Clongowes
1819 Superior of the Mission
1821 Lived at Dublin from 1821 to his death.
1829 At the laying of the foundation stone for Gardiner St
He was a good religious of indefatigable zeal and indomitable spirit.
He published some books, and promotes a society for the printing of Catholic works in Dublin.
There is a sketch of Father Aylmer in Caballero’s “Scriptores SJ” and de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Had studied at Stonyhurst before Ent.
He went to Palermo with Messers St Leger, Esmonde, Ferley, Butler and Cogan, graduating DD. He was present in Rome with the other Fathers at the establishment (Restoration?) of the Society in July 1814 by Pius VII.
1817 He was for a short time Minister at Clongowes, and then in 1817 appointed Rector by Father Grivelle, the Visitor.
1818 Clongowes was closed due to an outbreak of typhus, and immediately he built a Study Hall and Refectory.
1821 He went to Dublin where he remained until his death. He was Superior at the Dublin Residence in 1816, then 1822, and finally 1841. In 1829 the First stone of St Francis Xavier, Gardiner St was laid during his Rectorship. The Chapel at Hardwicke St was then converted into a school, and was the germ of the current Belvedere.
Father Aylmer was an edifying religious man, possessed of moderate but useful talents. He was a zealous, pious and indefatigable Missioner, a man of good sense, sound judgement and fortitude.
He promoted in Dublin a Society for the printing and distribution of cheap Catholic books of piety, when it was much needed.
He was subject to a hereditary disease of the heart which caused his death in a manner similar to that of his father. His end was very sudden.
His brother was an officer of the Austrian Cuirassiers, and considered one of the best swordsmen of that service.
There is a sketch of Father Aylmer in Caballero’s “Scriptores SJ” and de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Aylmer, Charles
by C. J. Woods

Aylmer, Charles (1786–1847), Jesuit priest, was born 29 August 1786 at Painstown, near Kilcock, Co. Kildare, the seat of his father, Charles Aylmer (1720?–1801), one of the county's representatives at the Catholic Convention held in 1792, and said in 1798 to be worth £1,600 p.a. He was the fourth son in a family of six sons, one of whom was William Aylmer (qv), and six daughters. His mother was Charles Aylmer's second wife, Esmay, daughter of William Piers of Castletown, Co. Meath, and his wife, Eleanor (née Dowdall). Charles Aylmer junior studied at the school conducted in Dublin by Thomas Betagh (qv) and at the catholic novitiate at Hodder, near Stonyhurst, Lancashire, moving in July 1809 to Palermo in Sicily to join the Society of Jesus, restored in that kingdom in 1805. While in Palermo he published with Paul Ferley and Bartholomew Esmonde, A short explanation of the principal articles of the catholic faith (1812) and The devout Christian's daily companion, being a selection of pious exercises (1812).

Aylmer's ordination to the priesthood came in Rome in 1814, the place and year of the formal restoration of the entire society, an event at which he was present. He returned to Ireland to become superior (1816) of the Jesuit house in Dublin, and rector (1817–20) of Clongowes Wood College, the Jesuit-run secondary school opened (1814) at a short distance from Painstown. In 1820 he took his final vows. He was again superior of the Jesuit house in Dublin in 1822, 1829, and 1841, as such presiding at the laying of the first stone of the Jesuit church – St Francis Xavier in Gardiner Street. From its origin in 1827 he was an active member of the Catholic Book Society and published further devotional works. On the death of his brother Robert in 1841, he inherited the Aylmer property at Painstown. Charles Aylmer died 4 July 1847 in Dublin.

W. J. Battersby, The Jesuits in Dublin (1854), 118–19; F. J. Aylmer, The Aylmers of Ireland (1931), 212; Timothy Corcoran, The Clongowes Record, 1814 to 1932 (1932); Timothy Corcoran, ‘William Aylmer (1778–1820) and the Aylmers of Painstown’, Seamus Cullen and Hermann Geissel (ed.), Fugitive warfare: 1798 in north Kildare (1998), 34–49

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Charles Aylmer 1786-1849
Charles Aylmer was one of the six novices who set out in 1809 for Sicily to study philosophy and theology on the Restoration of the Society there.

He was born at Painstown County Kildare on August 29th 1896. He was educated at Stonyhurst and entered as a novice at Hodder there in 1808. After his ordination he ministered to the British Army stationed at Palermo.

He witnessed the official Restoration of the Society at the Gesù in Rome :
“At eight o’clock in the morning, His Holiness came in state to the Gesù, where he celebrated Mass at the altar of St Ignatius, attended by almost all his cardinals and prelates, and about 70 or 80 of the Society. After his Mass and Thanksgiving, we ass proceeded to the Sacristy. None were admitted by the Cardinals, Bishops and Jesuits. Here the Bull, which reestablishes the Society all over the world was read. A soon as it was read, the Pope presented it with his own hand to Fr Pannizoni, whom he constitutes Superior in his own States, until the General shall otherwise determine. Drs Milner and Murray Archbishop of Dublin were present. Also the Queen of Etruria, and the King of Torino. Little did I expect to be present at so consoling a ceremony in the Capital of the World. O truly how sweet is victory after such a hard fought battle!”

Fr Aylmer returned to Ireland and held various posts at Clongowes and Hardwicke Street. He was Superior of the Mission 1817-1820. In 1829, while Superior, the foundation stone at Gardiner Street was laid. He, together with Fr Esmonde, did much for Gardiner Street Church, collecting money both at home and abroad for the building of the Church and Presbytery.

He also found time to write and is included in Caballero’s “Scriptores SJ” and de Baecker’s “Bibliotheque”.

He died of a hereditary disease of the heart on July 4th 1849.

Bathe, Robert, 1582-1649, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/911
  • Person
  • 1582-15 June 1649

Born: 1582, Drogheda, County Louth
Entered: 23 October 1604, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: c1610, Rome, Italy
Final vows: 05 September 1622
Died 15 June 1649, County Kilkenny

Of the “Villa de Drochedat” Meath
Educated at Irish College Douay
1610-1611 Sent from Rome as Professor of Spirituality and Scholastic to Irish College Lisbon
1617 in Ireland
1622 in Meath or Dublin
1626 in Ireland
1637 described as fit to be a Superior, but has choleric temperament
1649 in Kilkenny aged 70

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was a learned and most edifying priest and had rendered great service “by sea and by land”.
He was Rector of the Drogheda Residence.
He went thrice to Rome on behalf of the Irish Mission
Socius to the Mission Superior.
He was forty-five years on the Mission, and from Drogheda worked throughout Ulster in the midst of many perils. (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had started his studies at Douai before Ent at 26 October 1604 Rome
After First Vows he was sent to complete his studies at Roman College and was Ordained c 1610
1610 Sent to Lisbon to be Prefect of Studies and Spiritual Father at the Irish College
1612 Returned to Ireland and assigned to Dublin Residence - possibly stationed at Drogheda
1621 Working in Drogheda, during which time he became entangled in the dispute between the Vicar General and the Franciscans.
He retired from Drogheda in the early 1640's and spent his last years at Kilkenny where he died, 15 June, 1649. He was named amongst the six Jesuits who resisted the censures of Rinuccini.
Regularly asked to conduct Irish Mission business in Rome
For many years Robert was Socius to the Superior of the Mission.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Robert Bath 1581-1649
Robert Bath was one of the most distinguished Jesuits who worked in Ireland during the period 1610-1649.

Born in Drogheda in 1581 of a family which gave a martyr to the Society, he entered the Jesuits in 1604. His work was mainly centred around Ulster, and for a long period he was Superior of the Drogheda Residence.

Three times he went to Rome to report on the state of the Mission.

Worn out after a ministry of 45 years, he died in Kilkenny on June 15th 1649.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BATH, ROBERT. In 1624, he had been settled for about two years at Drogheda, where he instituted the Sodality of the B. Virgin Mary. He was thrice sent to Rome for the good of the Irish Mission. Worn out with age and infirmity, he died at Kilkenny, on the 15th of June, 1649.

Brown, Ignatius, 1630-1679, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/959
  • Person
  • 01 November 1630-30 December 1679

Born: 01 November 1630, County Waterford
Entered: 27 June 1651, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: 1657/8, Valladolid, Spain
Final Vows: 15 August 1668
Died: 30 December 1679, Valladolid, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)

Ignatius Brown 1st
Uncle of Ignatius Browne - RIP 1707

1655 1st or 2nd year Theology at Valladolid- College of St Ambrose.
1660 Reading Philosophy at Valladolid
1663-1673 In Ireland - Preacher and Catechist
1675 On business of Irish Mission in France
1678 Back to Ireland
Founded the College at Poitiers

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1663-1673 Sent from Compostella to Ireland. Reputed to be a learned, eloquent, zealous and edifying Preacher in Cork, Drogheda and other towns (Primate Plunket)
1666 At Waterford Preaching, Catechising and administering the Sacraments, and had been a Missioner for three years. (HIB Catalogue BREV - ARSI)
1673 Forced to leave Ireland in the Summer for health reasons and went to England. In November he went to Paris, and by his industry and the influence and generosity of great friends - including Queen Catherine of England - he procured letters patent for the erection of the Irish house of studies at Poitiers, and was declared its first Rector.
1679 He was appointed Confessor to the Queen of Spain, but died later that year at Valladolid on his way to Madrid. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
Founded the Irish College Poitiers; Writer
In his condemnation of Serjeant’s book he signs himself “Professor of Theology" (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
For his writings cf de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”. A controversial manuscript of his exists at Stonyhurst
Note from No Ch Name (actually George) Murphy :
Named in an Italian letter, dated Dubin 22 November 1672, and written by the Martyr, the Archbishop Oliver Plunket, Primate of Ireland, to Father General Oliva, in which, after expressing his affectionate regard for the Society, and informing him of the meritorious labours of Fathers Rice and Ignatius Brown at Drogheda, he speaks of Father Murphy as a good Theologian, and excellent religious man, a man of great talent, and a distinguished preacher in the Irish language. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Philosophy before Ent 27 June 1651 Villagarcía
1653 After First Vows he was sent to Valladolid for Theology where he was Ordained 1657/1658
1658 Appointed to Chair of Philosophy at Valladolid
1663-1671 Sent to Ireland and was appointed to Waterford for the next eight years, frequently preaching in various parts of Munster.
1668-1671 Arrested in Autumn 1668 and sentenced to imprisonment, but through the influence of a nobleman was released.
1671-1673 Sent to Drogheda
1673 Appointed Superior of Dublin Residence but did not assume office. He was now in poor health and received permission from the General to retire to one of the European Provinces. He was then able to take an active part in the negotiations for the foundation of the Irish College of Poitiers of which he became the first Rector.
During his Rectorship he published a refutation of the attacks of Andrew Fitzjohn Sall against the Catholic Church.
He resigned or was relieved of the Rectorship at Poitiers in 1679, apparently for the publication against the apostate Sall. So, he retired to his province of origin (CAST) and died at Valladolid on 30 December of the same year.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Brown, Ignatius
by Terry Clavin

Brown, Ignatius (1630–79), Jesuit, was born on either 1 or 9 November 1630 in Co. Waterford, and by the late 1640s he was studying philosophy at Compostella in Spain. On 27 June 1651 he entered the Society of Jesus as a novice at Villagarcia before resuming his studies, this time in theology, at Valladolid. Following his ordination c.1658, he remained in Valladolid, where he taught philosophy for a period.

In spring 1663 he travelled to Ireland in the company of another Jesuit, Andrew Sall (qv), to join the Jesuit mission in his native land. From his base in Waterford, he toured south Munster, ministering to the faithful. Although he was arrested in 1668, an Irish noble quickly arranged his release. On 15 August of the same year he pronounced his final vows. In 1671 he was transferred to Drogheda, and was appointed superior of the Jesuit house in Dublin two years later. However, he never took up this position, due to poor health, and withdrew to the Continent via England.

By autumn 1673 he was in Paris, where he played a role in efforts to establish a foundation for the Irish Jesuits in France. Royal permission to establish such a house in the Jesuit province of Aquitaine was duly granted in April 1674, after which Brown purchased a building in Poitiers. He and his Irish colleagues hoped that the foundation would function as a seminary, but the Jesuit general refused to permit this. Instead it was to provide an education for young lay Irish Catholics and to act as a refuge or place of retirement for Jesuits on the Irish mission. He did not obtain actual possession of the house till winter 1675–6, and was formally appointed rector of the Irish college at Poitiers in April 1676. In 1677 the college was described as having many boarders. The college was expected to be funded by donations from Irish Catholics, but the actual sources of its endowments are uncertain and aroused the suspicion of Brown's superiors. It appears that the college was mainly funded by largesse from the Portuguese queen of England, Catherine of Braganza.

Meanwhile, his former colleague and travelling companion Sall had created a sensation in Ireland by converting to protestantism in 1674, a decision that he sought to justify in a sermon preached at Christ Church cathedral, in which he outlined a number of what he saw as false doctrines upheld by the catholic church, placing particular emphasis on its claim of infallibility. In 1675 Brown published his The unerring and unerrable church, in which he vigorously upheld this claim, arguing that scripture required an infallible authority to interpret it. Sall's apostasy had attracted a plethora of catholic denunciations, but it is a testament to Brown's skill as a controversialist that Sall devoted the bulk of his True catholic and apostolic faith (1676) to refuting his criticisms. Brown wrote under a pseudonym, leaving Sall unaware of the identity of his bitterest critic. Brown unleashed a final salvo against Sall with his An unerrable church or none (1678).

In early 1679 he resigned as rector of the Irish college and went to Castile to serve as confessor to the niece of King Louis XIV of France, Marie Louise, who had just married King Charles II of Spain. He died 30 December 1679 at Valladolid. He appears to have been the author of a pamphlet entitled Pax vobis. Purporting to be a dialogue between two English protestants, this was a theological satire directed against the protestant religion. Published in 1679, it went through six editions in the ensuing decade and was popular among English catholics.

F. Finegan, ‘The Irish college of Poitiers: 1674–1767’, IER, 5th ser., civ (July–Dec. 1965), 18–35; L. McRedmond, To the greater glory (1991); T. H. Clancy, ‘Pax vobis, 1679: its history and author’, Recusant History, xxiii (1996–7), 27–33; ODNB

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BROWN, IGNATIUS. There were two Fathers of this name.
The senior was born at Waterford in 1630, and after studying a course of Philosophy at Compostella, there enrolled himself at the age of 21, amongst the children of St. Ignatius. In a letter of F. St. Leger, dated Compostella, the 16th of January, 1663, 1 read, “Towards the beginning of Spring, F. Andrew Sall* and F. Ignatius Brown are to leave this Province for the Irish Mission. Both are learned, zealous, and duly qualified”. The Annual Letters shew that he, with FF. Maurice Connell and Robert Mead formed a glorious Triumvirate - that he excelled as a powerful and indefatigable preacher a son of Thunder at Cork, at Drogheda, and other towns in Ireland. His zeal made him several enemies : he was threatened with imprisonment and exile; but he was superior to fear, and he steadily persevered in the exercise of his Apostolic functions, until the summer of 1673, when the state of his health obliged him to go to England for the benefit of the Hot Baths. In the early part of November, the same year, he proceeded to Paris, where by his active industry, and the influence of Pere Ferrier, Confessor to Louis XIV, and by the generosity of friends, especially Catharine, Queen of Charles II, he procured in the year following Letters patent for the erection of an Irish House of Studies at Poitiers : and he was appointed its first Rector. His death happened late in the year 1679, at Valladolid, on his way to Madrid, where he had been appointed Confessor to her Majesty the Queen of Spain. We have from the sprightly pen of this Father :
1 “The Unerring and Unerrablc Church”, ( in reply to a sermon of Andrew Sall, preached at Christ’s Church, Dublin, on the 5th of July, 1674), Svo. 1675, pp. 310.
2 “An Unerrable Church or None”, 9 Svo. 1678, pp. 3-i2.
3 “Pax Vobis”. It seems that the MS. had been left with the English Fathers. The General of the Society, Charles de Noyelle, had heard of it, and on the 13th of March, 1683, gave directions to the English Provincial. F John Keynes, to report to him an opinion of its merits. His answer is dated Ghent, the 23rd of September following. In sending the judgment of those who had examined “the posthumous work of F. Ignatius Brown, written in English, entitled Pax Vobis”, he says “All united in admiring the vein of humour that pervades the work; but thought the publication inexpedient, taking all circumstances into consideration”. F. Keynes, after reading the work, coincided in their opinion. It has since been frequently printed.
Another work called Pax Vobis by E. G. was edited in 1679. Query. Who was the author?
Pax Vobis, an epistle to the Three Churches, a small octavo of 14-1 pp. printed in London in 1721, is said by the Rev. John Kirk, p. 80, Vol. V. Catholicon, to have had Dodd, the Historian, for its Author.

Cawood, Michael, 1707-1772, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1038
  • Person
  • 23 June 1707-04 June 1772

Born: 23 June 1707, Dublin
Entered: 28 January 1726, Seville, Spain - Baeticae Province (BAE)
Ordained: 1737, Granada, Spain
Final Vows: 17 March 1742
Died: 04 June 1772, Dublin Residence

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Rector at Salamanca
1738 Sent to Ireland from Seville
1786 He is found in a list of Dublin Priests by Battersby.
He was stationed in Dublin for the rest of his life.
(Curiously all his dates are the same as those of Simon Shee in the HIB Catalogues of 1752 and 1755).
His name is found in many old Spanish books.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of a Protestant father who converted later
After First Vows he made all his studies at Granada and was Ordained by 1737
1738 Sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence, serving as a Curate at St Mary’s Lane Chapel.
1755 Superior of Dublin Residence and remained there till his death 04 June 1772
From time to time he ministered to the Graham family Ballycooge House, near Arklow. He died in Dublin 04 June 1772, and was buried in the Old Abbey cemetery, Arklow, in the tomb of the Graham family.

◆ Clongowes Wood College SJ HIB Archive Collection - SC/CLON/142
Michael Cawood 1707-1787
Michael Cawood, son of a Protestant father who was later received into the Church, was born in Dublin 23 June 1707 and received into the Society at Seville, 28 January 1726. He made all his ecclesiastical studies at Granada and was ordained priest by 1737. Recalled to Dublin in 1738 he was assigned to the Dublin Residence and served as curate at Mary's Lane, He was superior of the Residence for some time after 1760. From time to time he exercised his ministry at Ballycooge House, Arklow, seat of the Graham family. He died at Dublin 4 June 1772 and was buried at the Old Abbey cemetery, Arklow in the tomb of the Graham family.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CAWOOD, MICHAEL, of Leinster, was born in 1708; joined the Order at Seville on the 28th of January, 1726, and came to the Irish Mission twelve years later. He took his solemn Vows on St. Patrick s Day Day, 1742. For several years he assisted a Parish Priest in Dublin; but further information I have been unable to procure.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

Chamberlain, Edward, 1644-1709, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1040
  • Person
  • 04 August 1644-05 October 1709

Born: 04 August 1644, Dublin
Entered: 23 October 1666, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1674, Rome, Italy
Final Vows: 15 August 1680
Died: 05 October 1709, Dublin

Alias Kitson

Studied for 5 years at Tournai (BELG) the 3 years in Rome (ROM)
1670 arrested and examined re Peter Talbot
1672 Teacher at Monte Santo and Illyric College, Loreto (ROM) - was Spiritual Coadjutor Penitentiary at Loreto for 3 years
1673 or 1678 Teaching Grammar at Loreto and studying Theology
1679-1682 Procurator of the Irish College at Poitiers (which was opened in 1675)
1683-1691 Dublin Residence and at Carlow College
1695 had spent three years in London
“1697 Fr Chamberlain and other Fathers still in prison 02 May 1697” (Archives Irish College Rome)
1702 Imprisoned and to be deported to Cadiz with Anthony Martin (convicted of being a Jesuit)
“Fr Chamberlain and other old Fathers in Dublin very poor having for 4 years lost what was common and private” (Archives Irish College Rome). Was living at Dominican Convent, Cooke St Dublin

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1683 In Ireland at the Dublin College
1695 In Spain
1697 Living near the Dominican Convent, Cooke St, Dublin (Report of a spy, in St Patrick’s Library MSS Vol iii p 118)
He was a Penitentiary in Loreto for three years; Procurator of Poitiers; In London for three years

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Studied Rhetoric at Tournai and Philosophy at Irish College Rome before Ent 23 October 1666 Rome
After First Vows he was sent for Regency at Monte Santo and Loreto, completing his studies at the Roman College and being Ordained there 1674
After Tertianship he was an English speaking Confessor for pilgrims at Loreto until 1678
1678-1681 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Procurator
1681 Sent to Ireland and to Dublin where he remained until his death 07 October 1709. He taught secondary school for many years and was Procurator of the Dublin Residence when the city fell to the Williamites. He was then imprisoned along with other Jesuits and members of his own family. He was twice sentenced to deportation but managed to remain.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CHAMBERLAIN, MICHAEL. I meet with two Fathers of this name.
The Junior I find engaged at the commencement of James the Second’s reign, with F. James Kelly and F. Hugh Thaly, in teaching a school in Dublin. They had twenty Pensioners, and a respectable Chapel recently erected in that city. He was living in Ireland, but in secret, during the persecution in the Autumn of 1698. Sacellum salis insigne

Cleere, Edward, 1580-1649, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1055
  • Person
  • 1580-19 July 1649

Born: 1580, Waterford
Entered: 16 February 1605, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: c 1609, Rome, Italy
Died: 19 July 1649, Waterford Residence

Alias Clare

Had studied Philosophy and Theology at Irish College Douai before entry
Was the oldest of the Professed Fathers in 1648
Was stationed for a while at the Dublin Residence (his name appears on a book at Carlow College of that residence)
1617 was in Ireland - mentioned in the 1621 and 1622 Catalogue : talented with good judgement, prudence and experience. A pleasing character who might be formed to be a Superior
1649 Superior in Waterford

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was a Preacher; The oldest of the Professed Fathers in 1648; Superior at Waterford in 1649; A man of talent

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Studied Rhetoric at Irish College Lisbon before, then Philosophy at Douai before Ent 1605 Rome
After First Vows completed his studies probably in Rome, and was ordained by the time he returned to Portugal 1609
1609 Returns to Portugal
1611-1616 Sent by the General to Irish College Lisbon as Prefect of Studies to replace Robert Bathe. In his letter to the Portuguese Provincial he said “I have seen such reports of Fr Cleere’s prudence, mature judgement and learning, that I trust the Irish College will not suffer by the change of Fr Bathe”
1613 Sent to Ireland and to Waterford Residence and worked there, Cork and the rest of Munster
1642-1649 Appointed Superior at Waterford Residence (1642-1647) and was Acting Superior of the Mission awaiting the new Mission Superior (1647-1648). In 1649 he was again appointed Superior of the Waterford Residence and died in Office19 July 1649

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Edmund Cleere (Clare) 1580-1649
Fr Edmund Cleere was a Waterford man.

Fr Holywood, writing on June 30th 1604 says : “I left behind me in Paris studying theology Mr Edmund Cleere”

As a priest Fr Cleere worked in Waterford and was Superior of our House there for many years. In 1648, Bishop Comerford of Waterford presented a memorial to the Nuncio beggin a revocation of the censures. Among the signatories was Edmund Cleere together with John Gough, William McGrath and Andrew Sall, all of the Society.

When the Visitor Fr Verdier visited Waterford, he found Fr Cleere almost superannuated. He died shortly afterwards in Waterford on July 19th 1649.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CLARE, EDWARD, of Waterford. The first time that he comes across me is in a letter of F. Holywood, dated the 30th of June, 1604, in which he says, “I left behind at Paris studying Theology, Mr. Edward Clare”. For many years he was Superior of his Brethren at Waterford; and when F. Verdier visited him, he found him almost superannuated. I learn from F. William Malone’s letter, dated Galway, the 2nd of August, 1649, that F. Clare, the most ancient of the Professed in the Mission, died at Waterford on the preceding 19th of July, “dierum et meritorum plenus”.
N.B. Anthony Wood and his copyists, Harris and Dodd, evidently confound this Father with his contemporary, F. John Clare. Had they turned to the conclusion of F. John Clare’s admirable work, The Converted Jew, they would find that he expressly calls himself an English Pryest.

Colgan, Patrick, 1707-1772, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1067
  • Person
  • 21 August 1707-15 December 1772

Born: 21 August 1707, Dublin
Entered: 15 March 1726, Novellara, Italy - Venetae Province (VEM)
Ordained: 1741, Rome, Italy
Final Vows: 15 August 1743
Died: 15 December 1772, Dublin Residence

Left Irish College Rome for Novellara with Captain Harvey of the Irish Guard at Ravenna - then Entered Venetian Province 15 March 1726

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1931 Taught Logic at Parma (in pen)
1741 Sent to Ireland
1752-1755 Assisting a PP in Dublin
1772 Director or Confessor of the Poor Clares in Dublin

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Educated at the Jesuit school in Dublin and Dr John Harold’s Academy before Ent 15 March 1726 Novarella
After First Vows he spent a short Regency at Carpi and then studied Philosophy at Piacenza. He was then sent back to Regency, also at Piacenza. He studied Theology at the Roman College and was Ordained in 1741.
1743/44 Tertianship (VEM)
1744 Sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence. He worked in the chapel of Dirty Lane (ancestor of St. Catherine's Parish Church, Meath Street) and was also Spiritual Director to the Poor Clares.
He died in Dublin Residence 15 December 1772

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
COLGAN, PATRICK, was born in Dublin, on the 16th of March, 1706, and joined the Society in the Venetian Province, on the 11th of January, 1725. He came on the Irish Mission in 1741, and was Professed on the 2nd of February, 1752, at Dublin, where he was assisting a Parish Priest. I meet with him three years later, after which he escapes my observation.

Cusack, Henry, 1579-1647, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1153
  • Person
  • 1579-02 November 1647

Born: 1579, Dublin
Entered: 19 September 1605, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1610, Antwerp Belgium
Final Vows: 31 March 1624
Died: 02 November 1647, Dublin

Studied in Ireland and Douai becoming Master of Arts. Studied 3 years Moral Theology at Antwerp
1609 Teacher of Grammar
1610 was a Priest
1611 In 3rd year Theology; Came to Ireland
1622 was in Belgium
1629 Rector in Dublin
1611 Catalogue BELG Moderate abilities, tenacious in own opinion. Does not know Irish but would be useful on Irish Mission. Agreeable manner would make a good Minister or Procurator
1621 Catalogue On Irish Mission with good health, talent and judgement. Always calm, sermons are praised. Would be a good Superior

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Henry and Mary née Brandon
Studied Humanities for six years partly at Antwerp and partly at Douai, graduating there MA.
Admitted to Society by Father Manoereus, Provincial of Belgium (Tournay Diary p 617, No 1016)
He is named in the letter of Father Lawndry (Holiwood) to the Superior of the Irish Mission 04/11/1611, by which stage he was continuing studies. (IER April 1874, p 292)
Professor of Greek; A good Preacher; Rector in Dublin 1629
(cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Henry and Margaret née Brandon
Had studied at Antwerp and later at Douai where he graduated MA before Ent 19 September 1605 Tournai
After First Vows he was sent to Antwerp for studies and was Ordained there in 1610
1611 Sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence, but returned to Belgium to complete his studies at Louvain 1621-1622
1622 Came to Dublin and was initially Rector at the College in Back Lane. Though this College did not last long, he remained in Dublin all of his further life up to his death, and indeed stayed in the city during the mass expulsions of 1641-1642. He died in Dublin 02/11/1647
While in Dublin he offered strenuous opposition to the mischief-making priest Paul Harris and the former Jesuit Michael Cantwell, who were determined to cause a rift between the secular and regular clergy.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CUSACK, HENRY. His services for the Irish Mission were required in February,1622

Dillon, George, 1598-1650, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1186
  • Person
  • 02 February 1598-04 August 1650

Born: 02 February 1598, County Roscommon
Entered: 09 October 1618, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1624, Douai France
Professed: 1636
Died: 04 August 1650, County Waterford - Described as "Martyr of Charity"

Superior of Irish Mission January 18 April 1646 & 1650-04 August 1650

Parents were Earl of Roscommon and Eleanor Barnewall
Studied Humanities in Ireland. Studied Humanities in Tournai and 2 years Philosophy at Douai. Not in Belgium in 1622
1622 At Douai in 2nd year Theology
1625-1628 Teaching Philosophy and Mathematics at Douai

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Earl of Roscommon
Distinguished for both virtue and learning. He died a victim of charity, exhausted by daily and nightly attendance upon thee plague-stricken in Waterford, surviving his fellow Martyr James Walshe by two months. Eulogised in the Report to Fr General Nickell on the Irish Mission (1641-1650) by the Visitor Mercure Verdier - a copy of which from the Archives of the English College Rome, is now in the collection of Roman Transcripts in the Library of Public Record Office, London (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of James, First Earl of Roscommon and Eleanor née Barnewall
After First Vows he studied Theology at Douai and was Ordained there c 1624
1624-1629 Taught Philosophy and Mathematics at Douai, and then made his Tertianship at Gemaert (Gevaert?).
1629 Sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence where he became Superior 1635
1639 Returned to Belgium in an unsuccessful attempt to establish an Irish Seminary at Douai which came to nothing
1641-1646 On the surrender of Dublin he left and became Superior of the Galway Residence
1646 Appointed Superior of the Mission. However, he could not assume office because new directions came from the Holy See saying that a position of authority could not be held successively without interruption.
1647 Back in Belgium on business with the inter-Nuncio.
He seems to have steered clear of political entanglements during the Rinuccini mission in Ireland. According tom the Mercure Verdier 1649 Report to the General on the Irish Mission he had declared that if he were appointed Superior of the Mission he would admit to the Society no one of old Irish origin without the gravest reasons. He was not alone in this view.
1650 Owing to the death of the General, Verdier’s concerns were not acted on, and so he succeeded William Malone as Superior of the Mission in January 1650 sometime during the year he went to Waterford which was plague stricken after the Cromwellian war, and there he displayed huge courage in his ministrations to the sick, but died a martyr of charity of this plague himself 03 June 1650

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962

George Dillon (1646)

George Dillon, son of James Dillon, Earl of Roscommon, and Eleonora Barnewall, was born in the diocese of Meath on 2nd February, 1596. Having obtained his degree of Master of Arts at Douay, he entered the Novitiate of Tournay immediately after, on 9th October, 1616. He studied theology at Douay for four years, and spent another four years teaching philosophy and mathematics there, until 1629, when he returned to Ireland, and was stationed in North Leinster. He made his solemn profession of four Vows in 1636, and published a controversial work on the Reasons and Motives of the Catholic Faith. He was Superior of the Galway Residence from 1641 to 1646. On 18th April, 1646, he was appointed Superior of the Mission, but this arrangement had to be cancelled on 11th August of the same year, on account of a decree issued by Pope Innocent X (1st January, 1646), which limited the term of office of religious Superiors to three years, and forbade the appointment to a new Superiorship of anyone who had already been a Superior until he had passed a year and a half in the ranks as an ordinary subject.

George Dillon (1650)

The first appointment of Fr George Dillon in 1646 had been rendered inoperative by the decree of Pope Innocent X. on triennial government, and now this second appointment was to be rendered almost equally ineffective by death. The Cromwellian war brought pestilence in its wake. Several of the Fathers died in the service of the plague-stricken. When Fr James Walsh was carried off by the disease at Waterford (4th June, 1650), Fr George Dillon continued his ministrations. On the feast of St Ignatius he attended the Mayor of Waterford, who had caught the infection, heard his confession, and gave him Holy Communion. The next two days he exhausted himself hearing the confessions of the terrified people who thronged to him, and was stricken down himself. He died, a martyr of charity, fortified by the rites of the Church and invoking the name of Jesus, on 4th August, 1650.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father George Dillon 1596-1650
The honourable Fr George Dillon, son of Jame Dillon, Earl of Roscommon, was born on February 2nd 1596. At Tournai in 1618 he entered the Society.

On his return to Ireland in 1629, he was stationed in North Leinster. He became Superior of the Galway Residence 1641-1646. In that year, Fr General appointed him Superior of the Mission, but the appointment had to be cancelled, owing to a decree by Pope Innocent X, which required a year and a half in the ranks between two Superiorships. However, in 1650 Fr Dillon eventually became Superior of the Mission, only a short time before his death as a martyr of charity.

The Cromwellian War brought pestilence in its wake. When Fr James Walsh succumbed to the disease in Waterford, Fr Dillon took his place. On the Feast of St Ignatius he attended the Mayor who had contracted the infection. Shortly afterwards, on August 1st, Fr Dillon himself died of the plague, invoking the Holy Name of Jesus.

It is related, that in the same year as him, his brother James Dillon fell down twelve steps of stairs in Limerick, and he died four days afterwards. In the presence of death, he renounced Protestantism and received the Last Sacraments. This great grace was attributed to the prayers of his saintly brother.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
DILLON, GEORGE, son of the Earl of Roscommon : illustrious by birth, he was still more illustrious by his virtues. As a missionary he was a pattern of the inward spirit, full of zeal, meekness and charity. He used to insist amongst his Brethren on the necessity of unwearied labour, whilst the Almighty blessed them with health and bodily vigour, as old age was rather a period of suffering than of active exertion. Exhausted with the duty of daily and nightly attendance on the sick at Waterford, when the plague raged in that city, he at length was numbered on the 4th of August, 1650, amongst its fatal victims. He died most piously, invoking with his last breath the sweet name of Jesus.

Eustace, Oliver, 1605-1671, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1259
  • Person
  • 24 February 1605-12 November 1671

Born: 24 February 1605, County Wexford
Entered: 24 November 1627, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1634, Liège, Belgium
Final Vows: 31 May 1654
Died: 12 November 1671, Dublin Residence

1633 In 3rd year Theology at Liège
1650 CAT ROM Went to Mission 1635, Prof 4 Vows; Superior at Waterford for 8 years and New Ross 1 year. Preacher, Confessor and Director of Sodalities

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
A relative of Dr Walsh Archbishop of Cashel; possible a relative of Oliver Eustace MP for Carlow in 1639;
Studied Humanities and two years Philosophy before Entry, and three years Theology afterwards. He knew Irish, English and Latin. (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI)
A good Preacher; Superior at Wexford for nine years (pre 1649) and of great influence there as Preacher and Confessor; a good religious and “vir vere optimus”
1634/5 Came to Ireland
1651 Deported to France/Spain, but returned on the restoration of Charles II
1661 In Ireland again
1663 Named in ANG Catalogue as in Third year Theology at Liège
1665 At College of the Holy Apostles in Suffolk, aged c 60, infirm (Foley’s Collectanea, where by a misprint he says that he was alive in 1684)
1671 Died in Dublin “well deserving of the Society, whether as missioner or otherwise” (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Douai before Ent 24 November 1627 Rome
After First Vows he was sent back to Belgium at Liège for Philosophy (1) and Theology (4) studies and was Ordained there c 1634
1634 Sent to Ireland and to Wexford. He worked there until the fall of Wexford to Cromwell 1651/1652 and was Superior of the Wexford Residence before 1649
1651/52-1660 Deported to France, first to Paris and then to Quimper where he conducted Missions among the Irish diaspora at western French and even into Spanish ports
1660 For a while he was stationed with a small Irish community in Brittany but eventually crossed to England and was well received by the ANG Provincial. He spent some time in London district and later in Suffolk.
1666 In poor health he was sent to Ireland living at the Dublin Residence where he eventually died 12 November 1671

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
EUSTACE, OLIVER, was Superior of his Brethren at Wexford in 1649, and is reported then to be “vir vere optimus”. Shortly after he went to Spain; but just before the restoration of Charles the II he returned to his native Country : bad health however, induced him to pass some time in England. I find from the Annual Letters that he died at Dublin in the course of the year 1671, “in Missione et alibi de Societate bene meritus”.

Eustace, Thomas, 1636-1700, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1261
  • Person
  • 25 November 1638-30 January 1700

Born: 25 November 1638, Craddockstown, County Kildare
Entered: 01 December 1658, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1669, Palermo, Sicily
Final Vows: 02 February 1676
Died: 30 January 1700, Irish College, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

1675-1686 at Fermo College (ROM) teaching Philosophy and Grammar - and 1681 teaching Theology at Macerata College
1693-1700 At Irish College in Rome taught Theology, Philosophy and Humanities : Rector 1695-1698

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1692-1695 Rector at Rome. While there in 1692, he received letters from Fathers Relly and Wesly at Poitiers. He sought and procured for the “meritorious and afflicted Irish Mission” 50,000 reales from Fr Emmanuel de Sylva SJ, Lisbon. In 1693 he received a further letter from Father Relly, which was directed to the Greek College, Rome. On 05 February 1695, he received from Father Ininger of Ingolstadt, 500 scudi, or 1,000 florins for the Irish Mission.
In 1690 he was at Poitiers when his nephew William, a lieutenant Sir Maurice Eustace’s infantry writes to tell him that his brother has been killed at the siege of Limerick, “riding as a volunteer”. He also asks him to get him transferred into Tyrconnell’s Horse, in which regiment he would have less work and more pay.
1697 There is a petition against him by his sister-in-law, Mrs Eustace at Craddockstown.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of William and Jane née Whyte (daughter of Nicholas Whyte at Leixlip)
Had already studied Philosophy at Antwerp before Ent 02 December 1658 Rome
After First Vows he was sent for Regency at Fermo, and then studied Theology at Palermo where he was Ordained c 1669
1669-1671 Sent teaching at Ascoli
1671-1672 Tertianship at Florence
1672-1678 Taught Philosophy and Theology at Fermo, and also spent one year during that time as Penitentiary at Loreto
1679-1681 Sent to Macerata College to teach Philosophy
1681-1683 Sent to Irish College Rome as Prefect of Studies
1683-1684 Sent to Fermo College again to teach Dogmatic Theology
1684-1690 Sent to Ireland and was appointed Superior of the Dublin Residence and school, and was also made a Consultor of the Mission, and was though to be a very suitable candidate for Mission Superior. He remained there until the Williamite conquest, and the Mission Superior Lynch sent him to Rome as Procurator of the Irish Mission. On the way he spent a year at Poitiers to attend to urgent financial business of the Mission in the immediate aftermath of the fall of Dublin.
1691 Arrived in Rome and proved himself a tower of strength of the mission during the darkening years that preceded the penal times acting as procurator of the Irish Mission.
1694 Appointed Rector of Irish College Rome 10 October 1694 and died in office 30 January 1700.

Everard, James, 1575-1647, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1262
  • Person
  • 1575-30 June 1647

Born: 1575, Fethard-on-Sea, County Wexford
Entered: 1598, Portugal - Lusitania Province (LUS)
Ordained: 1604, Coimbra, Portugal
Died: 30 June 1647, Cashel Residence, County Tipperary

1603 At Coimbra (LUS) in 3rd year Theology
1606 Teaching Theology at Irish College Lisbon
1616 Catalogue Superior of Mission thinks he to fill Chair of Theology. Missioner
1617 Is in Ireland. Prudent and assiduous operarius, very hot tempered
1622 In Leinster
1626 Good in all, preaches well, not circumspect, choleric

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronolgica” :
(cf Foley’s Collectanea and Fr Young’s sketch in “Spicilegium Ossorium, Vol ii)
1607 Sent to Irish Mission from Spain, at the time his brother John, a judge, quitted the bench for conscience sake.
He is named in the letter of Father Lawndry to the General 04/11/1611 as then labouring assiduously on the mission in his neighbourhood. He was employed at Cashel chiefly for forty years, and was a distinguished Preacher.
He is named in a Report of the Irish Mission 1641-1650 (Verdier?). His virtues are fully recorded in this Report.
His death is recorded at Cashel residence a few months before the destruction of the city and church.
Is said to have died on his knees on Good Friday 16/04/1647 (though Easter Sunday was 21 April 1647!)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Redmond Everard. Brother of Sir John Everard, Speaker of the House of Commons
Had studied Humanities at the Irish College Lisbon and Philosophy at Coimbra before Ent 1598 Portugal
After First Vows he resumed his studies at Coimbra and was Ordained there 1604
1604-1605 Sent to lecture Philosophy at Braga
1605-1608 Sent to lecture Philosophy at the Irish College Lisbon
1608 Sent to Ireland and was at Callan by May, and then sent to the Dublin Residence
1621-1631 Sent to Drogheda and with Robert Bathe established there the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin. he was also a Consultor of the Mission.
1631 Sent to Cashel residence. In spite of poor health he was zealous in Ministry until his death there 30 June 1646

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father James Everard SJ 1575-1647
Fr James Everard was born in Fethard in 1575. He entered the Society in Portugal in 1598, the year the irish Mission was founded, by the appointment of Fr Holywood as Superior.

After some years spent professing Theology in Portugal, Fr Everard succeeded in getting to the irish Mission in 1607. That same year, his brother, who was a judge, resigned his post rather than act against his conscience.

His talents as a preacher were remarkable, and for 40 years he laboured unceasingly as a missioner amid innumerable perils. Cashel was the scene of his apostolic labours, though his name appears in a State paper as being secretly kept by Archbishop Matthews in his hose in Dublin in 1611.

He was of delicate health and suffered a good deal during his life, but his ill health never made him less prompt for any call.

He was found dead on his knees on Good Friday morning, April 16th 1647, aged 72, of which 50 were spent in the Society.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
EVERARD, JAMES. This Rev. Father offered his services for the Irish Mission early in 1605, but could not be spared from Spain until the Autumn of 1607, at the very time that his brother John, an eminent lawyer and judge, quitted the Bench rather than betray his Conscience. At this period, intolerance, with the denial of civil rights, stalked abroad through his native Country, and the best men were seized for its victims, and the British Constitution was the by-word for injustice, oppression, and persecution to death for liberty of Conscience. During 40 years, F. Everard was reserved for Apostolic labor chiefly at Cashell. As a Preacher, he ranked in the first class : and though of a delicate constitution, and generally unwell, he was ever prompt and eager to fulfil the duties of his ministry. Severe to himself, he was all condescension and charity to his neighbours. On Good Friday, 16th of April, 1647, the venerable man was found dead on his knees.

Ferley, Paul, 1785-1850, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1282
  • Person
  • 22 July 1785-03 January 1850

Born: 22 July 1785, Dublin
Entered: 07 September 1807, Hodder, Stonyhurst, England - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1819, Palermo, Sicily
Professed: 01 January 1832
Died: 03 January 1850, Clongowes Wood College SJ

In Clongowes 1817

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Graduated DD at Palermo.
Taught Rhetoric, Metaphysics and Theology at Clongowes.
He had a great love for the Society and great sympathy and charity for his neighbour.

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Baptised in the old Parish Church of St Paul’s.
Early education was very successful in Humanities at Stonyhurst before Entry.
After First Vows he was sent with Messers Aylmer, St Leger, Butler and others to Sicily, graduating DD, and was very nearly made a Bishop.
1814 He came back to England and remained six months in Preston as Operarius.
He was then sent to Clongowes, and was one of the first to teach Philosophy and later Theology there.
He was the sent to the Dublin Residence, and was many years an Operarius there.
He was for some time teaching Rhetoric and Prefect of Studies, both at Clongowes and Belvedere.
1842 he finally went to Clongowes, where he remained until his death.
He was very fond of the Society, and remarkable for his great charity, such that the dying, or those in trouble always found him ready to comfort them.
For a few years before his death he suffered partial paralysis of his brain and other parts of his body. When no longer able to say Mass, he wished to hear it as often as possible, though unable to leave his room unaccompanied. Worn out, and fortified by the Sacraments, he died 03 January 1850.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Paul Ferley 1785-1850
Fr Paul Ferley was born in Dublin in 1785, and baptised in the old parish Church of St Paul’s. At the age of 22 he entered the Society at Stonyhurst.

He went with Messers Aylmer, St Leger, Butler and others to Sicily after his noviceship, where on completing his studies, he took the degree DD, and was very nearly made a Bishop.

On his return he worked at Preston for six months. Recalled to Ireland he was first to teach Philosophy, and after a few years Theology, at Clongowes. He laboured for many years as ab Operarius at the Dublin Residence in Gardiner Street. Finally he returned to Clongowes in 1842.

For some years he suffered from partial paralysis. Unable to say Mass, he wished to hear as many Masses as possible. At length, worn out in body and mind, he expired peacefully on January 3rd 1850.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

Gahan, Matthew, 1782-1837, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1338
  • Person
  • 07 February 1782-22 February 1837

Born: 07 February 1782, Dublin
Entered: 07 September 1805, Hodder, Stonyhurst, England - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 16 July 1810, Palermo, Italy
Final Vows: 01 November 1832
Died: 22 February 1837, Kirk Braddan, Isle of Man, England

in Clongowes 1817
by 1831 on Isle of Man

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied at Stonyhurst and Palermo after Entry.
1811 Sent to Ireland in November, he was a curate in Dublin for five years
1816-1822 Minister at Clongowes
1822-1824 With Charles Aylmer at Dublin Residence for two years.
1824-1837 Then for the remainder of his life, he was a Missioner on the Isle of Man, labouring under very great discouragements, privations and difficulties, which he endured with admirable patience. Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS calls him the “Apostle of the Isle of Man”.

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Having spent some time working in Dublin and six years as Minister at Clongowes, he asked permission to devote himself to the spiritual care of the poor abandoned Catholics of the Isle of Man, whose spiritual destitution, being without a Priest, and deprived as they were of all consolation of religion, touched him to the heart. To their service and instruction he devoted the remainder of his life, amidst inconceivable discouragements, privations, difficulties, and labours, all of which he bore with exemplary patience and fortitude. He build two Chapels in the two chief centres of the island - Douglas and Castletown. Until his death he remained at his solitary post sustaining unaided the heavy labours of his mission and keeping alive the faith among the people. So he was styles “The Apostle of the Isle of Man”.
He died age 55, consoled by the reception of the last Sacraments, owing to the intervention of Divine Providence, which had sent him a priest, who had no knowledge of his illness, to be with him in his last moments.

◆ Irish Province News
Irish Province News 4th Year No 1 1928

We are indebted to Fr. Provincial for the following copy of an inscription on a mural tablet in a Church near Douglas, Isle of Man, He received it from Mr .L. W. R. Murphy :

“Memoriae at quieti Rev Matthaei Josephi Gahan SI, qui suos in Hibernia reliquit ut sese Monam incolentium saluti impenderet. Religionc in Deum, zelo in proximum, benignitate in pauperes, comitate in olmies eximius, inter aspera valetudinis semper indcfessus, bins sacris aedibus erectis, febri tandem, dum agonizanti subveniret correptus, pie obit 22 Feb. 1837, ann. aet. 56.”

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Matthew Gahan SJ 1782-1837
In the Isle of Man on February 22nd 1837, died Fr Matthew Gahan, who had been styled the “Apostle of the Isle of Man”.

He was born in Dublin in 1782 and entered for the Irish Mission at Hodder in 1805.

After having filled various positions in Dublin, and having been Minister for six years at Clongowes, he obtained the permission of his Superiors to devote himself to spiritual care of the poor and abandoned Catholics of the Isle of Man, whose spiritual destitution, through being without a priest and deprived of all consolation of religion, touched him to the heart. He had previously visited them occasionally and cheered them with his presence. To their service, he devoted the remainder of his life amid inconceivable privations and difficulties, all of which he bore with great patience and fortitude.

He built two chapels at the two chief centres on the island, Douglas and Castletown. Til his death he remained at his solitary post, bearing unaided the heavy labours of the Mission and keeping alive the faith among the people. To him, under God, is due the preservation of the Catholic faith on the Island.

It is no wonder he died at the early age of 55, worn out with the hardship and labour. But God, who seeth in secret, did not abandon him in the end. In the time of his great need, Fr Aylmer happened to come across to the island to visit him, not knowing he was sick, and arrived at the spot in time to prepare his soul for its last journey.

If you visit St Mary’s Church in Douglas today, you will see in the wall a stone slab, commemorating Fr Gahan as “The Second Apostle of the Isle of Man” – the first being St Patrick himself.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
GAHAN, MATTHEW, of Dublin; born on the 7th of February, 1782 : entered the Society for the Irish Mission at Hodder house, on the 7th of September, 1805 : after completing his Noviceship there, commenced his Theology at Stonyhurst, and finished it at Palermo, where he was ordained Priest, on the 16th of July, 1810. In the November of the following year, he returned to his native Country, and for five years assisted as Curate in the Parishes of St. Michan and St. Nicholas without, in Dublin. In 1816, was stationed at Clongowes-Wood College, in the capacity of Minister, an office which he filled for six years, when he was ordered back to Dublin as Coadjutor to F. Aylmer, in the residence of the Society in that city. At the end of two years his Superiors permitted him to establish himself in the Isle of Man, the poor Catholics of which were lying like sheep without a Shepherd, and whom he had occasionally before visited and comforted, and cheered with his presence. To their instruction, and relief, and service, he devoted the remainder of his life, amidst inconceivable discouragements, privations, difficulties and labours, all of which he bore with exemplary patience and fortitude. This good Father was called to the reward of his zeal and charity, on the 22nd of February, 1837, aet. 55. Prof. 4, after five days illness. He had built a Chapel at Douglass and Castletown. Future generations will hail him as the Apostle of the Isle of Man “supra modum Apostolus Insulae Monae”.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

◆ Interfuse

Interfuse No 32 : April 1984

PORTRAIT FROM THE PAST : APOSTLE OF THE ISLE OF MAN – MATTHEW GAHAN

Rev WS Dempsey

Mathew Gahan was born in Dublin in 1782 and joined the (partially restored) Jesuits at Hodder in England in 1805. He studied Philosophy at Stonyhunst (1807-09) and Theology at Palermo (1809-11). Ordained in Sicily in 1810, he returned to Ireland and worked as an operarius in Dublin (Saint Mary's Lane) from 1811 to 1815. He became Minister of Clongowes Wood College in 1816, a post which he held till an extraordinary assignment came his way in 1823. Father William Dempsey, Parish Priest og Peel in the Isle of Man, takes up the story.

The Catholics of the Isle of Man, now numbering two or maybe three hundred, were bereft of a pastor and appealed for immediate help to the Vicar Apostolic of the Northern Province of England.

After some delay, a Father Brown volunteered for the Mission. In the meantime, the Vicar Apostolic arranged with the Irish Jesuit college at Clongowes Wood, then recently established, to provide a resident priest for the Many Mission. And so, about the year 1823, one of the professors at the College, Reverend Mathew Gahan, S.J., nephew of the learned Augustinian with whose name many are familiar as the author of Catholic Piety, took up his new and unpromising post in Douglas.

He was accompanied by an Irish school-master, named John Kelly, whose services were to be of inestimable value to the faith and whose stern discipline was to impress more than the minds of the rising generation. A school was built beside the chapel of Saint Brigid in 1824, and here “Kelly the Roman” (as the Douglas people nicknamed him) presided over his mixed gathering of pupils. The school was mixed in every sense: Catholics and Protestants, girls and boys, rich and poor all crowded together in one small room. The children paid their weekly fees in kind as well as coin, potatoes, apples, cabbages and groceries formed the staple “school pence”.

Father Gahan, however, by no means confined his labours to Douglas. The whole Island was his parish, and regularly he would set off to visit his flock in Castletown, Peel and Ramsey. At that time there were no modern roads, only rough narrow bridlepaths, as Dean Gillow puts it: “rambling at their own sweet will up hill and down dale in the roughest and unreadiest manner conceivable”. There was nothing for the priest but to mount “St Francis' pony”. He tramped afoot over the rocky, shingly or sandy, unformed roads, ofttimes weary and footsore. Once in a way a cart as rough as the roads might give him a lift for a mile or two, but there were to snug railways, or even engineer-planned highways in those days....

Father Ganan was in the habit of visiting Ramsey about four times a year in order to afford the few faithful an opportunity of hearing Mass and receiving the sacraments. He used to send word in advance from Douglas that he was coming on the following Sunday. This message would come to an old Mr Collins, who despatched his son Edward to two Catholics living five miles off at Kirk Andreas, to tell them of the advent of the priest. From Andreas the lad had to strike off across country to Ballaugh village, where four more Catholics lived. Then he made his way home to Ramsey, after a round of more than twenty miles. On the appointed Sunday the little Flock came together in the back parlour of Mr Freel's shop at the bottom of King Street, hard by the Market Place. On these occasions the entire congregation assembled for Mass did not number more than twelve: Only 'the grown-ups were allowed to enter the room. The children were shut out for fear of spoiling the good man's carpet. This arrangement was kept up for a considerable time.

The chief monument to Father Gahan's apostolate is the church of St Mary at Castletown, which he opened in 1826. It had long been his dearest wish to raise a worthy house of God in the ancient capital of the Island, and his appeals to his countrymen in Ireland for this object were many and earnest. Sometimes crossing over in a fishing craft to Killough in Co. Down, he would spend two or three weeks together collecting funds; and the old people used to recall that no Catholic ever died without the sacraments while their devoted pastor was absent on these errands of charity.

Douglas, however, was far outstripping Castletown in population and civic importance; and Father Gahan realized. the need of providing a larger church there, more conveniently situated in the centre of the town. His indefatigable zeal, aided by generous Irish friends, enabled him to purchase an old theatre known as St George's Hall at the corner of Atholl Street, and Prospect Hill. This building was easily and quickly adapted to the purposes of a Catholic place of worship and dedicated to St Francis Xavier. Underneath was a spacious basement, admirably suited to the pedagogic exercises of Kelly the Roman. In the year 1836, just a few months before his death, Father Gahan had the satisfaction of saying Mass at his new chapel. “For the purchase and erecting of this chapel, writes his friend, “Father P Kenney, SJ, he had the leave of the late Vicar Apostolic, Dr Penswick, who even signed a deed empowering Mr Gahan to sell the premises in which the old chapel stood”, though the sale was never effected. Yet when this chapel was on the eve of being opened the present Vicar Apostolic refused to allow it to be opened unless conditions were signed by Mr Gahan and the Provincial Superior which they could not admit. The delay and all, its concomitant disappointments, and the anxieties which it produced, materially affected his health, which had been long, declining. In the course of the winter the oid chapel could not be used as the rain got through the roof, and as the missioner lived in the house at Douglas, he, was not able even in dry weather to go so far. These circumstances occasioned the chapel to be opened in a private way, and the good man knew the comfort of saying Mass in it some months before his death. Father Aylmer went over to see him on the 17th February, to induce him to come to Dublin, to relieve his mental and bodily sufferings, but he only arrived in time to attend him in his last illness. That very evening he had returned from one of his missionary calls, sick in fever, which terminated his edifying and useful life in five days”.

The “second apostle of the Isle of Man”, as Father Gahan had been affectionately styled, was laid to rest in the cemetery of Old Kirk Braddan. A few days later there appeared in the Mona's Herald the following tribute from the pen of a distinguished Protestant contributor: “Among the recent deaths you have had to record in your journal, none has been more generally and severely felt than that of the Rev. MJ Gahan, the clergyman of the Roman Catholic chapel in this town. The Rev. Mr Gahan's kind and amiable character in private life, his unostentatious and extended charity among the poor, without any invidious distinction, is scarcely equalled and seldom excelled. It is now upwards of twelve years since this excellent man commenced his christian labours in this Island, exposed to privations and vexations which few men but himself would have submitted to, and we have reason to believe his constitution suffered great ly from their bane ful effects. His ardent desire was to finish his earthly career in the Island he had adopted, and his memory will long be revered by a numerous circle of friends and admirers of his private and public virtues. I am sure of this - the poor have lost a real benefactor and an indefatigable spiritual guide...”

A marble tablet in the grounds of St Mary's, Douglas, perpetuates his memory in these words: “Friends have erected this monument to the peaceful remembrance of the Rev. Mathew Joseph Gahan, SJ, He left his own people in Ireland to devote himself to the salvation of the inhabitants of the Isle of Man. He was conspicuous for his piety towards God, for zeal towards his neighbour, for kindness to the poor, and for charity towards all. Amidst the hardships of weak health, he was ever unwearied. At length after building two churches he was struck down by fever whilst attending a dying bed, and sweetly expired February 22nd, in the year of sal vation 1837 at the age of 56”.

For a little while Father Aylmer, who attended him in his closing hours of life, remained in charge of his work until the Vicar Apostolic of Northern Ireland, Dr Brown, took over the spiritual administration of the Island. There was some talk at this time of entrusting the Manx mission to the Jesuit Fathers, and even of building a Jesuit college in the island; but it all came to nothing, and the college was subsequently erected in North Wales, under the title of St Beuno's.

EPILOGUE
In a recent letter to Father socius, Ms Ella Caine of Douglas assures us that Mathew Gahan's grave is still tidy and that she “will continue to look after it” as she has done for several years.

Gellous, Stephen, 1613-1678, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1358
  • Person
  • 01 February 1613-22 July 1678

Born: 01 February 1613, Gellowstown, Dublin
Entered: 17 May 1639, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 04 April 1643, Antwerp, Belgium
Died: 22 July 1678, County Wexford

Son of John and Maud O’Dunn.
Studied Humanities in Dublin under a priest Mr Edmund Doyle, Philosophy in a house of the Society under Fr Henry Cavell. They taught Grammar in Dublin.
Received into Soc in Belgium by Fr Robert Nugent
1644 At Antwerp (Arch Irish College Rome IV)
1647 Came to Mission (1650 CAT)
1649 Catalogue is at Kilkenny
1666 Is near New Ross where he conducts a boarding school with Fr Rice, administers the sacraments and other parochial duties. Was captured three times but set free each time. Now on the mission 23 years
A book in Waterford Library has “Steph Gellous Soc Jesu Resid Waterf”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of John Gellows, a carpenter, and Maud née Dunn (Mechelen Album) Family originally from Gellowstown, Co Meath (now Bellewstown)
Early education was in Dublin under Edmund Doyle, a Priest, and then two years Philosophy under Henry Cavell at the Dublin Residence. He then taught Grammar at Douai until he was admitted to the Society by Robert Nugent, Mission Superior, 07 March 1637, and then sent to Mechelen for his Noviceship in 1639.
Studied three years Moral Theology. Knew Irish, English, Flemish and Latin.
1647 Sent to Irish Mission and had been a Professor of Poetry. Taught in the lower schools for three years and was a Confessor (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI)
1649 Teaching Humanities at Kilkenny (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
1650-1660 He was a Missioner in New Ross, and in spite of all the efforts of the rebel Cromwellian forces, he continued by a constant miracle to escape arrest and say his daily Mass, which he did for twenty years. He went sometimes disguised as a faggot-dealer, a servant, a thatcher, porter, beggar, gardener, miller, carpenter, tailor, milkman, peddlar, dealer in rabbit-skins etc. he was nevertheless arrested four times, but always contrived to escape.
1666 Living near New Ross, where he kept a boarding school with Father Rice, taught Humanities and was a Missioner, Preacher, and occasionally with Father Rice, performing the duties of PP to the satisfaction of the Vicar General. The school took the lead of all the others in the country, but it was broken up in the persecution of 1670.
1673 He then taught about forty scholars near Dublin, and then tried to return to New Ross to unsuccessfully re-open his school there.
He was captured four times, and as often released, including riding a race with Cromwellian soldiers. He worked in the Irish Mission for twenty-three years.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John, a carpenter, and Mouda née O’Dunn
Had studied Humanities for seven years under Edmund Doyle, a secular priest in Dublin, and then studied Philosophy for two years at the Dublin Residence with Henry McCavell (McCaughwell) as his teacher. With these studies, he then started teaching Grammar in Dublin, until he was received for the Society by Robert Nugent.
1641 After his First Vows he studied Theology at Antwerp, and with special dispensation from Fr General before he had begun his fifth year in the Society, he was Ordained there 04 April 1643. This dispensation was granted thanks to the Flemish Provincial’s report on Stephen's mature virtue.
1643-1644 Theology was not his forte and so he was sent immediately to Lierre for Tertianship
1644 Sent to Ireland and was to teaching at Kilkenny. Mercure Verdier in his Report of 24 June 1649 for the General on on the Irish Mission described Gellous as “an excellent religious man, who takes no part in worldly business”.
After the Cromwellian conquest he left Kilkenny to exercise his mission in Co Wexford. He became something of a legend for resourcefulness during the “commonwealth” regime. he was captured four times but managed to get free. On one occasion, a protestant judge, disgusted by the perjury of Gellous’ betrayer let him go free. On another occasion he was deported to France, but due to a storm the Captain had to return to port, and once there let Gellous go free. On yet another occasion, he was out on a mission when he rode straight into a troop of Cromwell’s, and he challenged them to a horse race. They accepted, and at the end of the race let him go.
His HQ during these years was New Ross, and it was there, probably at the Restoration, that he opened a famous school, and with Stephen Rice conducted it with great success. Protestants, no less than Catholics were anxious to have their sons educated at this school whom was seen as a genius teacher. One feature of this school was the production of plays he had seen acted in Belgium.
1670 He was visited by the Protestant bishop and told to close the school and leave New Ross. The decision angered Catholic and Protestant locals alike. He staged his farewell by putting on for free, four plays acted by his pupils for the town, and then withdrew to Dublin.
1671-1673 Outside Dublin he conducted a small school by himself for two years
1673 Back in New Ross by popular acclaim and was there until 1678 - the year of his death
Most probably notifications of his death to the General would have gone astray due to the confusion caused during the Titus Oates's Plot.
By the Society’s standards, Stephen was not a clever man in book-learning, but his judgement on weighty matters affecting the Irish Mission was both sought for and respected by the General.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Stephen Gelouse SJ 1614-1675
In Ireland exact date and circumstances unknown died Fr Stephen Gelouse, a man of versatile talents and great zeal. He was born in Meath in 1614, was admitted to the Society in 1639 by Fr Robert Nugent in Dublin, did his noviceship in Mechelen and two and a half years of Philosophy under Fr Henry Cavell in the Dublin Residence.

He will always be remembered for his long and arduous ministry in New Ross, where for nineteen years he laboured as a priest and teacher. His school was famous. Fr Stephen Rice, the Superior writes this to the General : “Stephen Gelouse SJ has been working in and near New Ross this year 1669, and ever since 1650. When the plague and Cromwell’s tyranny ceased, Fr Gelouse taught a small school in a wretched hovel, beside a deep ditch, and there taught a few children privately. When the king was restored, his companion thought they might make a venture, the hut was levelled and a large house built, where they opened a school. It became famous and drew scholars from various parts of Ireland. There were 120 boys, of whom 35 (18 Catholics and 17 Protestants) were boarders. The Jesuits were forced to take the Protestants by their parents. The school flourished for 6 years. Fr Stephen produced a play which was enacted in the main square in new Ross. The play lasted three hours and was witnessed by a very large throng of Protestants and Catholics, many of whom came from distant towns to witness the novel spectacle. For the first time in Ireland, scenery was used on the stage. After the play there was a distribution of prizes”.

When the school was forced to close in 1670, in spite of Protestant parents who fought the authorities for its continued existence Fr Gelouse went to Dublin, where he taught a school of 40 pupils. In spite of persecution, he never missed a day saying Mass for 20 years. He was arrested 4 times, but managed to escape. He used adopt many forms of disguise : a dealer in faggots; a servant; a thatcher; a porter; a beggar; a gardener; a miller; a tailor; a milkman; a peddler, a carpenter and seller of rabbit skins. It was no wonder that he was so expert at training the youth to act.

In 1673 he tried to reopen the school at New Ross, but Protestant fanaticism defeated him. He was still alive in 1675.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
GELOSSE, STEPHEN, born in 1617, was teaching Poetry in Kilkenny College in 1649, and was then reported by the visitor Pere Verdier, as a truly good and religious man. I believe he made his debut as a Missioner at Waterford, whence he was sent to Ross to attend F. Gregory Dowdall in his last illness, and who died in his arms, on the 9th of August, 1659. For the next 19 years he continued to exercise his pastoral functions in that town and neighbourhood. No dangers that threatened him from the Cromwellian party who filled every place with blood and terror, could deter this genuine hero from doing his duty : no weather, no pestilential fevers, no difficulties could hold him back from visiting the sick and the dying in their meanest hovels!. His purse, his time, his services, were always at the command of the distressed Catholic : it was his food and delight to exercise the works of mercy corporal and spiritual. Though the tyrant Cromwell had issued a proclamation to his troops, (and they were in the habit of searching the houses of respectable Catholics), that should they apprehend a Priest in any house, the owner of such house should be hung up before his own door, and all his property be confiscated; and that the captors of the Priest should be rewarded at the rate the Wolf destroyers formerly received (so little value was attached to a Priest s life); nevertheless F. Gelosse managed every day to offer up the unbloody sacrifice of the altar : his extraordinary escapes from the clutches of his pursuers border on the miraculous. He adopted every kind of disguise; he assumed every shape and character ; he personated a dealer of fagots, a servant, a thatcher, a porter, a beggar, a gardener, a miller, a carpenter, a tailor with his sleeve stuck with needles, a milkman, a pedlar, a seller of rabbit skins, &c. thus becoming all to all, in order to gain all to Christ. However, he was four times apprehended, as he told F. Stephen Rice; but his presence of mind never forsook him and he ingeniously contrived to extricate himself without much difficulty. After the restoration of Charles II. he set up a school at Ross, which took precedence of all others in the country, whether rank, numbers, proficiency, discipline, or piety, be taken into consideration, but this was broken up by the persecution in 1670. He then removed to the vicinity of Dublin, where he taught about forty scholars; and in August, 1673, he returned to Ross to reopen his school, but at the end of three months was obliged by the fanatical spirit abroad to abandon this favourite pursuit. He was still living in the summer of 1675, when I regret to part company with him.

Glannon, Christopher, 1711-1773, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1368
  • Person
  • 10 May 1711-02 September 1773

Born: 10 May 1711, Dublin
Entered: 11 September 1731, Landsberg, Germany Germaniae Superioris Province (GER SUP)
Ordained: 1739, Ingolstadt, Germany
Final Vows: 02 February 1752
Died: 02 September 1773, Watling Street, Dublin

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1741 Sent to Irish Mission
1755 Assisting a PP in Dublin (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
His brother lived at Kilmainham (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Educated at Jesuit school in Dublin and then began Priestly studies at Canon John Harold’s Academy
After First Vows he was sent for studies at Ingolstadt and was Ordained there 1739
1741 Sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence. He worked as an Assistant Priest at St James, and he died 03 September 1773 at Watling St Dublin (St Michan’s)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
GLANNAN, CHRISTOPHER, born on the 10th of May, 1711 : entered the Society in Germany, on the 12th of September, 1731, and was Professed in the Order, on the 2nd of February, 1752. I find that he came to the Irish Mission in 1741 and was assisting a parish Priest in Dublin, 14 years later, when I lose sight of him.

Gough, Ignatius, 1624-1693, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1378
  • Person
  • 1624-18 February 1693

Born: 1624, Sutton, Dublin
Entered: 05 October 1643, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 25 March 1651, Louvain, Belgium
Professed: 04 October 1654
Died: 18 February 1693, Dublin Residence

Alias Goagh

His father Patrick was Mayor of Dublin and his mother was Anne Piers. Father was landowner at Sutton, mother was from Iristernagh. His brother forfeited the estate. A stone at Sutton has family arms of Gough with inscription G & P. Anne Piers’ brother was a priest and uncle Thomas a Franciscan. William Piers - great grandfather of Fr Gough - sent Shane O’Neill’s head to Dublin!
Studied Humanities in Ireland and then 4 years at Antwerp under Jesuits
1646 At Mechelen College
1649 Not in Catalogue
1666 Catalogue On the Mission in Dublin having returned from Holland where he was a missioner for 9 years

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Patrick (Mayor of Dublin) and Anna née Piere or Piece. A Cousin of John Ussher, whose brother tried to deny Ignatius of his inheritance (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
Early education in Humanities was in Ireland, and then at Antwerp under the Jesuits. He was admitted to the Society by FLA Provincial Andrew Judocus and sent to Mechelen for his Noviceship. (Mechelen Album)
1666 He had recently arrived in Ireland from Holland, and he lived in Dublin engaged in many of the Mission’s affairs.
He spent fifteen years in Holland and twenty years in Ireland (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Secomd son of Patrick (Mayor of Dublin) and Anne née Piers
Educated at Antwerp before Ent 05 October 1643 Mechelen
After First Vows, studied at Louvain where he was Ordained 25 March 1651
1654 He was a Military Chaplain at Brussels, then he taught Humanities for a year at Oudenaarde, Belgium, and then made his Tertianship
1657-1665 Missionary work in Holland
1665 Sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence, where he spent the rest of his life as a Catechist, Teacher and Operarius until his death there 18 February 1693
He was heir to a considerable inheritance which provided a foundation for the Dublin Residence and enabled the Fathers of the Mission in Ireland to support themselves. But the Gough estate was confiscated on the fall of Dublin to the Williamites

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
GOAGH, IGNATIUS. This Father, as I find by the letter of his Superior, F. Patrick Lynch, dated Dublin, the 19th of March, 1693, had died on the 18th of February, aet. 68, Soc. 48. He had spent about 15 years in the Mission of Holland, and 25 years in the same capacity in his native country.

Haly, Robert, 1796-1882, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/473
  • Person
  • 11 April 1796-01 September 1882

Born: 11 April 1796, Cork City
Entered: 07 September 1814, Hodder, Stonyhurst, England - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 28 September 1828, Fribourg, Switzerland
Professed: 02 February 1833
Died: 01 September 1882, St Francis Xavier's, Upper Gardiner Street, Dublin

in Clongowes 1817
in Friburg Switzerland 1826
by 1840 Vice Provincial

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of James Haly and Elizabeth née Flyn
Educated at Stonyhurst, where according to Hon R More O’Ferrall, a contemporary, he was the most talented and most popular in a class of thirty-six boys.
1829 Sent to Ireland, and brought with him a letter from the Bishop of Geneva, in which he is said to be “pietate, doctrina, aliisque virtuum meritis maxime commendabilis”.
1839-1857 Consultor of the Vice-Province
1839 Appointed Rector of Clongowes 19 May 1839
1840 Appointed Rector of the College and Residence of Dublin, 15 October 1840.
1844 Sent to Rome as Procurator of the Irish Province
1851-1857 Appointed Rector of the College and Residence of Dublin
1857-1879 Superior of the Missionary Staff
1859-1864 Superior of the Galway Residence.
“Almost every Bishop and Priest in Ireland, and many outside Ireland, with thousands of Irish Catholics at home ad in exile, will receive, like tidings of the loss of a personal friend, the announcement of the death of Father Haly..........The most of his life was devoted to Apostolic toils in almost every Parish in Ireland, either by himself or as Head of a band of Missionaries. Though the hoary head and bent frame of age distinguished Father Haly a great many years ago, his vigorous constitution enabled him to continue the works of the pulpit and the confessional till his years had fully numbered four score. His brethren in the sacred ministry will remember at the Altar this most venerable Priest and most amiable saint” (The Freeman’s Journal, 02 September 1882)
He certainly was most amiable and friendly at all times and to every one - “mitis et humilis corde”.

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
The following story is told of Robert Haly by Joseph Dalton :
“During a Mission in Waterford in 1849, some of the ‘salters’ in the bacon store had no chance of getting to the ‘Holy Fathers’. They were kept busy all day and the crowds were too great at night. A group of them hit on the following plan to get to Confession : Father Haly was going home to the Parish Priest’s house, Annhill, after a hard day’s work. It was, I suppose, about 11pm. His road lay through a street in which a number of “salters’ lived. His attention was attracted by a strong light from one of the houses in front of him. On reaching the house, he found two men at the door. They accosted him very respectfully, apologised for delaying him, but asked him to walk in, as they had something to say to him. As soon as he entered, one locked the door, and the other told him plainly that they were poor ‘salters’ (about a dozen men in the room) who had no chance of getting the benefit of the Mission, unless ‘His reverence would forgive them for kidnapping him, and then sit down and hear their Confessions’. “And, your Reverence, we won’t let you out until you hear everyone of us’. Father Haly commenced at once and finished them all off. They went to their duty the next morning.”
Note from Edmund Cogan Entry :
There is an interesting letter of his in the Irish Archives, written from Palermo to Master Robert Haly (afterwards Father), then a boy at Hodder, Stonyhurst

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Haly, James
by David Murphy and Patrick Long

Robert Haly (1796–1882), Jesuit priest, rector of Clongowes Wood College, and missioner, was born 11 April 1796 in Cork city and baptised at SS Peter and Paul's, Cork, on 16 April. Educated at Stonyhurst, he entered the Society of Jesus on 7 September 1814 at Hodder, where he spent his noviciate, being professed of his first vows in 1816. He studied and also taught at Clongowes Wood College (established in 1814 as an Irish counterpart to Stonyhurst), before travelling (1825) to Fribourg, Switzerland, to study theology. Ordained on 29 September 1828, he undertook mission work in Geneva before returning in September 1829 to Ireland, where he joined the Jesuit community in Hardwicke St., Dublin.

Professed of his final vows in February 1833, he undertook his first parish mission in Ireland at Celbridge, and soon established a reputation as a preacher of some eloquence. In 1830 he was appointed as minister of his community while still working as a missioner, and in 1836 was appointed rector of Clongowes Wood College, Co. Kildare. Returning to Dublin in 1841, he worked as rector of the college and community in Dublin, before being appointed as procurator of the Irish province in Rome. A second term as rector at Clongowes began in 1842, a position he held until 1850. He served as the superior of St Francis Xavier's church, Dublin (1851–6), before moving to Galway as superior of the Jesuit community there in 1859. Alongside this appointment as superior in Galway (1859–65), he also served as superior of the newly established province mission staff (1859–76), restarting his career as a parish missioner.

During the next seventeen years he toured the parishes of Ireland and also travelled to England, where he supervised parish missions. By the end of his missionary career he had preached in almost every parish in Ireland and enjoyed a great public following. On one occasion in 1849, while he was engaged in mission work in Waterford city, a group of bacon factory workers kidnapped him. They could not attend his meetings due to their long work hours, and after he had preached a sermon and confessed the workers, he was released unhurt. In July 1857 he was appointed vicar general of the diocese of Killaloe. He was also involved in the erection of commemorative mission crosses in the parishes he visited, over fifty of these being erected during his term as mission superior.

In 1877 he suffered a severe stroke and, moving to the Gardiner St. community in Dublin, confined himself to light duties for the rest of his life. He died in Gardiner St. on 1 September 1882 and was buried in the Jesuit plot in Glasnevin cemetery. He has left a substantial collection of papers in the Jesuit archives in Dublin, giving details of his missionary work and parish life in Ireland in the nineteenth century. Kevin A. Laheen, SJ, published a study of this collection in Collectanea Hibernica (1997–2000).

Times, Cork Examiner, 7 Jan. 1850; Freeman's Journal, 2 Sept. 1882; ‘Memorials of the Irish Province, SJ’, Cork Hist. Soc. Jn., i, no. 3 (June 1900), 163–4; Cork Hist. Soc. Jn., viii (1902), 95–6; Henry Browne, ‘Father Haly’, John Healy (ed.), A roll of honour (1905), 247–94; Peadar McCann, ‘Charity-schooling in Cork city in the late 18th & early 19th centuries’, Cork Hist. Soc. Jn., lxxxvi (1981), 33, 109–15; lxxvii (1982), 51–7; Hugh Fenning, ‘Cork imprints of catholic historical interest 1723–1804’, Cork Hist. Soc. Jn., c (1995), 129–48; ci (1996), 115–42; Kevin A. Laheen, SJ, ‘Jesuit parish mission memoirs, 1863–76’, Collect. Hib., xxxix–xl (1997–8), 272–311; xli (1999), 153–223; xlii (2000), 120–80; Tim Cadogan and Jeremiah Falvey, A biographical dictionary of Cork (2006); WorldCat online database (www.worldcat.org) (accessed Nov. 2007); information from Fr Fergus O'Donoghue, SJ, Jesuit Archives, Dublin; John Paul II Library, NUI, Maynooth, information from Andrew Sliney; Russell Library, Maynooth, information from Penelope Woods; information from Christopher Woods

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Robert Haly SJ 1796-1882
Fr Robert Haly was our most renowned and universally loved missioner of the early days.

He was born in Cork on April 11th 1796, and entered the Society on its Restoration in 1814. He held many administrative posts, Rector of Clongowes in 1839, Procurator in Rome in 1844, Superior of the Mission Staff 1857-1879, Superior of Galway 1859-1864. But it is on his work as a Missioner that his fame rests.

During one of his Missions in Waterford in 1849, some of the “salters” from the bacon stores had no chance of getting to the “Holy Fathers”. They were kept busy all day and the crowds were too big at night. A party of them hit on the following plan to get confession. Father Haly was going home to the Parish Priest’s house, Anhill, after a hard day’s work at about 11 o’clock. His road lay through a street in which a number of the salters lived. His attention was drawn by a strong light coming from one of the houses in front of him. On reaching the house he found two men at the door. They greeted him respectfully, apologised for delaying him, but asked him to step in as they had something to say to him. As soon as he entered one man locked the door, and the other man explained that they were poor salters (about a dozen) who had no chance of doing the Mission, unless
“His Reverence would forgive them kidnapping him and then hear their confessions. And Your Reverence, we won’t let you out until you hear every one of us”.
Father Haly, though tired, was touched by their simplicity and faith, and he gladly heard them all.

He died in the residence at Gardiner Street on September 1st 1882, at the age of 86.

Hamlin, Bartholomew, 1590-1649, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1405
  • Person
  • 24 August 1590-15 August 1649

Born: 24 August 1590, County Meath
Entered: 14 November 1609, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: c 1614, Rome, Italy
Professed: 1625
Died: 15 August 1649, County Wexford

Has studied Philosophy and Theology at Rome
1611 In Roman College
1616 Catalogue At College of Ascoli Piceno (ROM) Talent good - ability for Missions above average. Taught Humanities
1619 Not in Catalogue
1621 Catalogue On the Mission 4 years. Strong, good talent and judgement, not so prudent. Is beginning to preach and this gives satisfaction.
1622 Catalogue Is in Leinster
1636 Catalogue Good in all, choleric, a preacher
1639 at Tournai (Tertianship?)
1642 At Mons College

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was Professor of Rhetoric and a man of ability; A great Preacher in Wexford;
Born in Drogheda according to one account
1617 Came to Ireland and attached to Dublin or Meath Residence (cf Foley’s "Collectanea")

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already studied at Douai before Ent 14 November 1609 Rome
After First Vows he resumed studies at the Roman College and was Ordained c 1614
Sent to teach at Ascoli he was then sent to Ireland 1616/7. Henry Fitzsimon had proposed that he should be appointed Procurator of Irish affairs in Rome, but the General was unwilling due to his short number of years in the Society.
1616/7 Sent to Ireland and to Dublin Residence. He taught Humanities at Back Lane.
1630 Fr General ordered the Mission Superior to admit Fr Hamlin to Final Vows, but in 1639 he was still a “scholastic”. It is likely that he met with the disapproval of the Anglo-Irish Consultors of the Provincial.
1639 Sent to Belgium with no reference to the General, who demanded an explanation. There was correspondence between the General and the Mission Superior for a time.
1644 Fr General ordered that Fr Hamlin be sent back to Ireland. He was sent to teach at the Wexford school.
1649 Verdure’s Visitation reported that he was a good teacher but that “he spoke out rather too freely in favour of the Nuncio, so that the Supreme Council was for putting him in prison”. He died in Wexford 15 August 1649

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
HAMLIN, BARTHOLOMEW, was a Sexagenarian at Wexford, in 1649, but in full vigour, teaching Rhetoric with great spirit, and meriting the reputation of an excellent and fearless preacher.

Heffernan, Thady, 1601-1639, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1436
  • Person
  • 1601-02 December 1639

Born: 1601, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 1628, Back Lane, Dublin
Ordained: - pre Entry
Died: 02 December 1639, Dublin Residence

Alias O’Hiffernan

1636 ROM Catalogue Talented, judgement and experience good

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Already a priest before Ent 1628 Back Lane, Dublin
After First Vows he seems to have been working in Dublin all his life, and because of lameness, to undertake missionary journeys. He died at the Dublin Residence 02 December 1639

Kiernan, Bernard, 1646-1710, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1536
  • Person
  • 13 March 1646-22 May 1710

Born: 13 March 1646, County Louth,
Entered: 24 February 1668. Salamanca, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: 01 May 1678, Salamanca, Spain
Final Vows: 15 August 1685
Died: 22 May 1710, Irish College, Santiago de Compostella, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)

Alias MacTiernan

1678 At Salamanca
1681 Teaching Grammar at Compostella
His “Sodality Book” was sold as waste paper and is at Clongowes

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries (1) Bernard Kiernan, (2) Bryan McTernan
Bernard Kiernan
1686 Teaching at Drogheda
1696 In Dublin as Superior and Prefect of Sodality - his Sodality Book is at Clongowes.
1708 In Dublin, but deported. He died 1710 of the plague at Compostella
Bryan McTernan
1697 In Dublin, living in the Parish of St Catherine’s (Report of a spy, in St Patrick’s Library, Dublin V 3.1.18)
Possibly is the same as Bernard Kiernan

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
After First Vows he was sent Regency for two years and then for Philosophy studies at St Ambrose, Valladolid
He was then sent to Royal College Salamanca, where he was Ordained by 01 May 1678
He then taught Humanities at Compostella and Oviedo until he was sent to Ireland
1686 Sent to Ireland and to Drogheda, where he taught Humanities until the town fell to the Williamites. So he went to Dublin and became Superior at the Dublin Residence. His particular Ministry was the promotion of Christian Doctrine circles and the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin. The Sodality register presented to him in 1696 is at Clongowes archive
1697 After the Proclamation against the regular clergy in 1697 he went into hiding in St Catherine’s parish but was discovered and deported. He was received back into CAST and for the next three years taught philosophy at Pontevedra. He was then sent to the Irish College, Santiago and taught Humanities there until his death 22 May 1710.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
KlERAN, or KlRWAN, BERNARD.This excellent and well disposed Missionary, “insignis operarius et bonae voluntatis”, had returned from Spain to Ireland early in 1686. Twelve years later I find him labouring in the Dublin Mission. This “pious and irreproachable Father” died abroad, early in the last century.

Kirwan, Dominic, 1632-1710, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1543
  • Person
  • 25 September 1632-19 September 1710

Born: 25 September 1632, County Galway
Entered: 16 October 1652, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1663, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 11 June 1672
Died: 19 September 1710, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Parents Edmund and Anastasia Blake
Studied Humanities at Galway for 5 years then sent by parents to study in Belgium - 2 years at Antwerp under the Jesuits
1663 At Limerick on Tertianship
1666 Catalogue At Galway, Catechist, administering Sacraments on the Mission a year or longer
1700 At La Flèche College
1705 Went to Ireland
1705-1710 At Irish College Poitiers Operarius and teaching Grammar (1708 in Ireland again)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Edmund Kieran and Anastasia née Blake
Early Education at Galway and Humanities at Antwerp
1633 A Tertian at Limerick in December
1644 Came from Belgium to Ireland in July (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
1666 Living in Galway and had been a Missioner there for up to a year (HIB CAT BREV - ARSI)
1699 and 1708 At Poitiers in exile, and had been invited to La Flèche, where he probably died before April 1674
Described as “a distinguished Missioner” (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Edmund (benefactor of the Society) and Anastatia née Burke
After First Vows he was sent to Antwerp for Philosophy and spent Regency successively at Oudenaarde and Ypres.
1659-1663 He was then sent to Louvain for Theology and was Ordained there in 1663
1663-1664 Tertianship at Lierre (Lier)
1664 Sent to Ireland and to Galway as an Operarius and Catechist. He remained there until the Williamite war when he moved to the Dublin Residence.
1698-1706 He was deported and found refuge at La Flèche College as a Missioner
1706 Sent to Irish College Poitiers where he died 19 September 1710

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
KIERAN, or KIRWAN, DOMINICK, was making his third year of Probation at Limerick in Dec. 1633, and was recommended as successor to F. Maurice Ward, who had died at Galway on the 2nd of the preceding month. After the Revolution he retired to Poitiers, and was courteously invited by the French Fathers to sojourn at La Fleche, where, I think he ended his days. This venerable man certainly died before April of the year 1714, as I find by F. Anthony Knoles letter of that date, who stiles him “praestans operarius”.

Latin, James, 1591-1647, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1555
  • Person
  • 1591-17 January 1647

Born: 1591, Naas, County Kildare
Entered: 05 April 1625, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae province (ROM)
Ordained: - pre Entry
Died: 17 January 1647, Unknown

1626 ROM Catalogue Novice in Rome
1637 Catalogue Mediocre in all and choleric - has experience
Kildare Arch Journal Vol III p190

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Of the Morristown-Lattin family (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
1627 Came to Irish Mission
1642 Living and working in Dublin in disguise.
1643 Imprisoned
Named in two letters, Waterford 10 October 1642 and Galway 03 August 1643
Though many Priests and Religious had been seized and executed by Puritans, James Latin and two of his Brethren braved every danger and were indefatigable in consoling and assisting suffering Catholics.
In the postscript, of the first letter the writer had just received intelligence of Latin’s arrest and committal to gaol. In the second letter it says he was still in prison, and had been arrested in the street while on his way to administer the Sacrament of the Sick. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Already Ordained on Ent 08 April 1625 Rome
1627/28 Sent to Ireland and Dublin Residence after only eighteen months in Novitiate. He arrived in Rouen to get a passage to Ireland, but while there the Mission Superior Christopher Holywood asked him to head for Paris on some Irish Mission business. So it was probably around 1628 by the time he arrived in Dublin. Once there he stayed in Dublin and along with Thomas Quin and John Purcell, survived the expulsion of clergy there by the Puritans of 1641-1642. However, he was then arrested and thrown into prison, Autumn 1642 or Spring 1643, and was still in prison a year later. For a while in prison he was able to say Mass and receive visitors, but these privileges were eventually revoked.
He was still living 10 June, 1647 when he managed to say Mass but was after the consecration stripped him naked and scourged him in the presence of bystanders by parliamentarians who profaned the Sacred Species, but the bystanders out of compassion prevailed on the torturers to spare him further ill treatment.
It is likely that he died soon after. He is not mentioned in Verdier’s report 'of the mission in 1649
About ten years after his arrival on the Mission he came into a sizeable fortune, sufficient to found a Residence and support two Jesuits at Naas.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LATIN, JAMES. All that I can gather concerning this zealous Father is from two letters, one dated from Waterford, (Manapia) 10th of October, 1642, the other from Galway, the 3rd of August, 1643. The first informs me, that though many Priests and Religious had been seized and executed by the Puritans, yet F. James Latin, and two of his Brethren braved every danger, and were indefatigable in assisting and consoling the Catholics groaning under Puritanical despotism. In the Postscript the writer says, he had just received intelligence of F. Latin s apprehension and commitment to gaol. The second States, that he was still a prisoner, and that he had been apprehended in the street in the act of proceeding to administer the sacraments to the sick.

2021 notes:
3 July 1614 James Lattin, youngest son of John Lattin & Alson Ashe from Morristown Lattin, Co. Kildare, was ordained in Rome. He joined the Jesuit order in 1625 and became a coadjutor in Dublin. He was arrested & deported in 1642 #localhistory

Lenan, Patrick, 1561-1621, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1568
  • Person
  • 1561-06 September 1621

Born: 1561, Drogheda, County Louth
Entered: 10 November 1596, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: pre Entry
Professed: 1617
Died: 06 September 1621, Dublin Residence, Dublin

Studied Theology before Ent. BA An Oxford graduate, MA of Douai and BD of Louvain. For 6 years a student of Stapleton and Lessius
1600 Not in Catalogue
1616 Catalogue On Irish Mission 14 years Age 60 Soc 17. Consultor on Mission. Strong in health, preacher, talented and zealous, pleasing address. Fit to be Superior. Of a choleric nature. Gifted as a Missioner “in perpetual motion”, a reconciler of enemies.
1617 Age 63 Soc 20. In Ireland
1621 At Poitiers, confined to bed by sickness
1622 In Leinster, Consultor of Mission. Suffering from Apoplexy.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronolgica” :
He was a missioner in Leinster and is mentioned in a letter of Thomas Lawndry (vere Christopher Holywood) to the General, November 1611, and printed in the Irish Ecclesiastical Record April 1874.
The Royal Commissioners in 1615 state :Lennon, a famous Priest, is kept by Nicholas Netterville” (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
He was an accomplished Theologian and Missioner “in perpetual motion”, the great reconciler of enemies.
He was a graduate of Oxford; MA Douai; BD Louvain; for six years a pupil of Stapleton and Lessius - a gifted solid man. (cf Holiwood and Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Studied Humanities at Oxford. Graduated MA at Douai and BD at Louvain, and was already Ordained on Ent 10 November 1596 Rome
1598-1600 After First Vows he studied at the German College
1600 Sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence and his work was limited to the city due to his lack of Irish language.
1606 Superior of Dublin Residence, succeeding Richard Field, until his death in office there 06 September 1621

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Patrick Lenan SJ 1561-1621
In Drogheda in 1554/5 was born Father Patrick Lenan. He was an accomplished scholar and theologian, a graduate of Oxford, an MA of Douai, BD od Louvain. He was for 6 years a pupil of Dr Stapleton, the great English controversialist, and also had Leonard Lessius as his Professor. He became a Jesuit in 1597, returning to Ireland in 1601.

His work lay mostly in the Pale and in Dublin, where together with Henry Fitzsimon and Barnaby O’Kearney, he was engaged in educating the youth of Dublin.

The Superior Fr Holywood referred to him as a very mature and reliable man and appointed him his Socius. The Royal Commission or Visitation of Dublin, charges Sir Nicholas Netterville as privately harbouring Lenan, a famous popish priest, and others in 1615.

A Proclamation of October 18th 1617 banished all priests from the country and Father Lenan was forced to leave. His subsequent history is unknown, but he died about 1621.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LENAN, PATRICK. With regret I am obliged to confess that I can barely state of this worthy Jesuit, that I find him actively employed in Leinster, in February, 1603, and in February, 1605. I believe he is the person thus reported by the Royal Commissioners in 1615, “Lennon, a famous Priest is kept by Nicholas Neterville”.

Lisward, Edward, 1715-1791, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1581
  • Person
  • 01 February 1715-13 September 1791

Born: 01 February 1715, Clonmel, County Tipperary
Entered: 04 May 1741, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: Salamanca, Spain - pre Entry
Final Vows: 15 August 1755
Died: 13 September 1791, John’s Lane, Dublin

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He died in the Augustinian House at John’s Lane
Great Preacher; Professor of Humanities
1752 In Dungarvan
1761-1766 Rector at Salamanca
Note from Gaspar Stafford Entry :
1739 One of the Examiners of Father Lisward (Dr McDonald and de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Hugo and Kathleen née Norris
Had studied at the Irish Colleges of Santiago and Salamanca where he was Ordained before Ent 04 May 1741 Villagarcía
1743-1745 After First Vows sent to Royal College Salamanca for further studies
1745-1750 Taught Humanities at León and for a time was Minister
1750-1761 Sent to Ireland and Dungarvan where he worked for eleven years
1761-1765 Rector of Irish College Salamanca
1765 Sent to Cadiz to arrange the business of the Mission and then to Ireland and the Dublin Residence. There is little record of his work in Ireland after his return until the suppression of the Society.
He was one of the signatories to the instrument accepting the suppression and became incardinated in Dublin diocese. he was a Curate at St. James's parish but in consequence of some difference with the PP he went to live with the Augustinians in John's Lane and ministered at their chapel, where his sermons attracted large numbers, until his death 13 September 1791

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Edward Lisward 1715-1791
Fr Edward Lisward was the pioneer of devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Ireland. He was Parish priest of our parish in Waterford from 1750-1761. There he founded a Confraternity of the Sacred Heart, the first in Ireland, anticipating by more than fifty years the Confraternity founded in Dublin by Archbishop Murray in 1816.

Fr Lisward had done his studies in Spain, and there he had drank in the devotion from Fr Bernard de Hoyas, who in turn had imbibed it from Fr Gilifret in France, who himself was a disciple of Blessed Calude la Colombière. So, the devotion came to Ireland in a direct line from its original sources.

Fr Lisward was born in Clonmel, the son of Hugh Lisward and Kathleen Morris. He entered the Society in 1741, and was Rector of Salamanca after his period in Waterford from 1761-1766.

He died in Dublin on September or December 13th 1791, in the Augustinian House at John’s Lane.

◆ Clongowes Wood College SJ HIB Archive Collection - SC/CLON/142

Edward Lisward 1715-1791
Edward visward, son of Hugo and Kathleen née Morris was born in Clonmel in February, 1715 and made his ecclesiastical studies at Santiago and Salamanca He was already a priest when he was received into the Society at Villagarcia, 4 May 1741. After his noviceship he was sent to complete his theological studies at the Royal College,Salamanca. From 1745 to 1750 he taught humanities and was also Minister at the College of Leon. On his return to Ireland he was assigned to work in Dungarvan and district and exercised his ministry there until summer 1761 when he was appointed rector of the Irish College Salamanca. Three years later he returned to Ireland. On his return to Ireland he seems to have settled in Dublin, certainly after the suppression he lived and died at the Augustinian monastery at John's Lane. He had already officiated at St James’ Parish but he left it in consequence of some difference with the Parish Priest.

Note, St James's Parish registers C of I “Burials: September 15 Rev. Mr Lisworth, Thomas St”.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770

Loose Note : Edward Lisward
Those marked with
were working in Dublin when on 07/02/1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LISWARD, EDWARD, was born at Clonmel on the 1st of February, 1715, and joined the Society at Salamanca, on the 5th of May, 1741. Nine years later he revisited his native Country as a Missionary, and was placed by Superiors at Dungarvan. After his Profession of the Four Vows, on the l5th of August, 1755, I can no longer trace him.

Locke, Edward, 1619-1671, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1585
  • Person
  • 10 October 1619-08 December 1671

Born: 10 October 1619, Colemanstown, County Dublin
Entered: 08 October 1629, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: c 1648, Wilna (Vilnius), Lithuania
Professed: 25 October 1654
Died: 08 December 1671, Dublin Residence

Son of Patrick and Mary Sarcefield
Studied in Ireland and Douai
1641-1642 Repeats Philosophy at Lille (GAL-BEL) and teaches Philosophy
1642-1646 At Vilnius studying Theology
1645 Not at Lille
1647 In Tertianship
1648-1651 At Brunsberg College Lithuania - made Doctor of Philosophy in 1651
1655 The Cossacks invade Lithuania, Jesuits dispersed, Locke went to Ireland
1665 In Brixia College (VEM)
1668-1669 Rector of Irish College - where?
related to Sarsfield and Edward Locke surgeon

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1650 D Phil at Wilna (Vilnius)
Rector of Irish College Rome; Travelled to England with Primate Plunkett
Had been out of Ireland thirty-five years on return

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Patrick and Mary née Sarsfield
Had studied Humanities and Philosophy under the Jesuits firstly in Dublin and then at Douai before Ent 08 October 1639 Tournai
After First Vows he studied at Lille graduating MA, and then went to Poland for Regency and studies where he was Ordained c 1648 and graduated D Phil at Wilna (now Vilnius, Lithuania) in 1650
1650-1655 Teaching Philosophy and then Theology at Wilna (now Vilnius, Lithuania)
1655-1660 Driven into exile with his Polish Jesuit colleagues, and he found refuge in the Lower Rhenish Province where he taught Moral Theology at Trier.
1660-1667 He was in the Venetian Province teaching Moral Theology at Brescia and Bologna
1667-1679 Rector of the Irish College Rome
1670 Sent to Ireland, he made the journey with Oliver Plunkett, arriving 20 February 1670, and he was made Superior of Dublin Residence, where he died the following year 08 December 1671

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Edward Locke 1620-1671
Fr Edward Locke was a Dublin man, born about 1620. In 1635 he left that city for Rome, where he was educated and joined the Society.

In a letter of his from Dublin, dated 27th February 1670, he tells us, that after a long and painful journey, he had reached Dublin 7 days before, and that owing to a severe winter he had remained about six weeks in London before sailing for Dublin. He says that he had left Dr Oliver Plunkett behind, in whose company he had travelled from Rome. He also remarks that he had returned to Dublin in the very same hour that he had quitted it 35 years beforehand.

Fr Locke was appointed Superior of the Dublin Residence, and in that capacity he called on the Archbishop, Peter Talbot, a sincere friend of the Order.

He died as Superior on December 8th 1671

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LOCKE, EDWARD. His letter dated Dublin, 27th of February, 1670, informs us, that after a long and tedious journey, he had reached Dublin seven days before that owing to the very severe winter he had remained about six weeks in London, before he took shipping for Dublin that he had left Dr. Oliver Plunkett behind (in whose company he had travelled from Rome) - that he returned to Dublin the very same hour that he had quitted it thirty-five years, before - that the new Superior of the Mission, F. Richard Burke, arrived at the same time, of whose character he speaks highly, and of whose future government he augurs most favourably that he had waited on the most illustrious Archbishop Dr. Peter Talbot, who was a sincere friend to the Order. The Father gives it as his opinion, that the distress of the country cannot be equalled elsewhere. I learn from F. Stephen Rice’s Annual Letters, that F. Locke died at Dublin in the year following, “in Missione et alibi de Societate bene meritus”.

Long, William, 1616-1685, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1592
  • Person
  • 20 March 1616-24 January 1685

Born: 20 March 1616, Dublin
Entered: 15 May 1639, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province BELG)
Ordained: 05 April 1645, Douai, France
Final Vows: 06 December 1656
Died: 24 January 1685, Dublin Residence

Parents Richard and Margaret Frende
Studied Grammar, Humanities and Philosophy under the Jesuits in Ireland - Fr Henry Cavell
Admitted by Provincial Robert Nugent
1642 At Lille repeating Philosophy
1645 At Douai in 3rd year Theology
1648 At Wexford
1649 Not in Catalogue but in the 1678 Archdekin edition said to be Residing at Dublin
1650 In Ireland, is a Minister and Teacher
1666 ROM Catalogue Confessor at Dublin Residence - catechising and administering sacs. On the Mission 18 years

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied Humanities and two years Philosophy before Ent. Knew Irish, English, French and Latin.
Taught Humanities for three years,
1650 Came to Irish Mission and was a Minister at Wexford (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI) A very religious and zealous man.
1659-1669 He converted many in Wexford and Dublin.
1660 In the Dublin Residence
(cf Father Morris’s “Excerpta”; Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Richard and Margaret née Frende
Had previously studied Philosophy under the Jesuits (Henry Cavell) in Dublin before Ent 1639 Tournai
1641-1645 After First Vows he resumed studies at Lille and Douai where he was Ordained 05 April 1645
1646 Sent to Ireland and Wexford until the fall of Wexford to Cromwell. During that “commonwealth” he exercised his ministry in Co. Dublin and after the Restoration he lived in the Dublin Residence where for many years he was Procurator. His preferred ministry was Catechising the poor and ignorant. he died in Dublin 24 January 1685, and was buried in St. Catherine's churchyard

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LONG,WILLIAM, was born in 1601. Pere Verdier, who visited him at Wexford in 1649, describes him as “valde religiosus”. In the sequel he obtained distinguished reputation as a Catechist. I find him actively engaged at Dublin in 1669, in the work of the ministry.

Malone, William, 1586-1656, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1667
  • Person
  • 06 February 1586-18 August 1656

Born: 06 February 1586, Dublin
Entered: 24 September 1606, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1615, Coimbra, Portugal
Final vows: 21 April 1624
Died: 18 August 1656, Irish College, Seville, Spain

Superior Irish Mission 20 April 1647-1650 and 27 June 1654

Educated at Portugal, Rome and Irish College Douai
1614 At Évora LUS in 3rd years Theology
1617 In Ireland Age 31 Soc 11
1621 Catalogue Talent prudence and judgment good. Gentle, a good preacher.
1622-1626 In Ireland
1638-1647 Rector Irish College Rome (Arch I C Rome Lib V 199) - 10 May 1647 (in 1642 Fr Richard Shelton is Prefect)
1650 Catalogue 65 years old on Mission 35 - Superior Irish College Rome and Sup Irish Mission 3 years
1655 Catalogue In Professed House Seville “Hospes HIB and operarius”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
The family had the title “Baron Sunderlin”
Very placid and gentle; A Good Preacher; Provincial; Writer; A good religious; Rector in Rome and Seville;
Irish Catalogues of 1609, 1621 and 1636 call him “Dublinensis”. In Foley’s Collectanea evidence is produced in favour of his being a native of Manchester. The author is of the view that Simon Malone was married in Manchester and returned home, or, that he took William to be educated in Manchester as “Harry Fitzsimon, and had him baptised there and that William was then sent to Rome.
William Malone Esq of Lismullen is on the Roll of Attainders of 1642
After First Vows did two years Philosophy and four Theology; He was proficient in English, French, Italian, Spanish and Latin.
Sent to Ireland 1615; Preacher and Confessor many years; Rector of Irish College Rome; Superior Irish Mission for three years (HIB Catalogue 1650)
Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS says DOB 1586. After studies in Rome and Portugal was sent to Ireland 1617, his name is on a list in 1617 (Irish Ecclesiastical Record August 1874);
Sent to Rome in 1635 as Rector of Irish College; Made Superior of Irish Mission 23 December 1647, succeeding Robert Nugent.
Taken prisoner at the siege of Waterford and deported. He went to Seville, and there he was appointed Rector of St Gregory’s 1651-1655 and he died there 15/08/1655 age 70.
His famous work dedicated to King Charles I : “A Reply to Mr James Ussher, his answere”, 1627, was published at Douai (cf de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”; Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS.
Hollingsworth - of “Christ College” - states he was born in Manchester 1592. This is supported by the paper by Rev Laurence Canon Toole SS, of St Wilfred’s Manchester, regarding his birthplace (Chronicle of Manchester at Chetham Library, also published as “Mancunis” in 1839). “Anno 1592, was borne in Manchester, William son of Simon Malone, a young man with pregnant wife, he was tempted by some Irish merchants till the rebellion broke out 1649... Seduced from the Reformed to the Romish religion, of which he became one of the most earnest and able assertors; he made a reply to Archbishop Usher’s answer to the “Jesuite’s Challenge”, but he was overmatched, his adversary being more eminently learned, and having truth on his syde
“Thomas de Warre, subsequently by inheritance, Lord de Warre, a priest and rector, or parson of the Parish Church of Manchester in the reign of Henry V, founded a college to be attached to that Church for the daily celebration of the Divine Office. This College was dissolved in the first of Edward VI; it was refounded by Queen Mary; suppressed again in the first of Elizabeth, and refounded again under the name :”Christ College” in 1578.
Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS gives date of RIP as 15 August 1655 age 70, making his birth 1586, six years earlier than Hollingsworth, who may have assumed date of Baptism to be DOB. There continues to be dispute about his place of birth in that his father’s name is in the marriage register in Manchester, and there is an entry in the burial register which suggests continual living in Manchester “1597, April 29, an infant douter of Symon Mallon”.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education was at Douai
After First Vows he studied Philosophy at the Roman College and Theology at Évora and Coimbra (LUS) where he was Ordained 1615
1615 Sent to Ireland and Dublin. He immediately became involved in a controversy with James Ussher (afterwards Protestant Archbishop of Dublin). Ussher’s book “An answer to a challenge made by a Jesuit in Ireland” (1625) was triumphantly refuted by Malone in a work entitled “A Reply to Mr . James Ussher, his Answer”, published in Douai which reduced Ussher to silence and encouraged the Catholics.
1626-1637 Sent as Procurator to Rome
1637-1642 Rector of Irish College at Rome 10 December 1637. While in office he secured for the College the house in the Via Baccina, where it remained until the suppression
1642-1647 Prefect of Studies at Irish College Rome until 20 April 1647
1647-1650 Superior Irish Mission 20 April 1647. In more normal times he would have been eminently equipped for the duties of Superior in view of his past successes as a missionary priest in Ireland and an administrator at Rome. But taking into account the complicated politico-religious state of Ireland in 1647 and his long absence abroad he proved quite somewhat challenged by the tasks awaiting him. He identified himself with the Ormondist faction, quarreled with Rinuccini and caused a rift between his subjects of Old Irish and Anglo-Irish origin. In the first months following the “Censures” he was away temporarily and had entrusted the Office to John Young, and he had neglected to inform the General of the evolving crisis. It has been suggested that his actions later demonstrated that he sides with the small Ormondist faction on the Mission who had publicly sided with the “Confederation” against the Nuncio. In his 1649 Report to the General on the Irish Mission, Mercure Verdier recommended that he be replaced in office as soon as he had finished three years, but not before tat so as to avoid trouble with the Confederation. In the event, the General died 08/06/1949 and the election of his successor 21 January 1650, it became possible to replace Malone without incurring the displeasure of the Confederation.,
1650 He was replaced in office in January 1650, and was a very zealous missioner, but he was asked to act as Vice-Superior, 1653, on the arrest of William St. Leger. Despite the advice of the Visitor Mercure Verdier, he was again appointed Mission Superior 27 June 1654, but as he was then in prison he could not assume office. He was then deported to Spain and appointed Rector of the Irish College, Seville, 27 October 1655. By this stage he was in somewhat broken health, and much of the administration involved on the rectorship was devolved to his companion John Ussher. He died at Seville 18 August 1656
(Addendum. William Malone published in 1611 the first English translation of the works of - the then Blessed - Teresa of Avilá)

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Malone, William
by Terry Clavin

Malone, William (1586–1656), Jesuit, was born 6 December 1586 in Dublin, the son of Simon Malone, a local merchant, and his wife, Margaret Bexwick from Manchester. He studied humanities at Douai before entering the Society of Jesus on 24 September 1606 at Sant’ Andrea, Rome. After completing his theology course at the Roman college, he went to Portugal, where he studied theology at Evora and Coimbra and was ordained in 1615. He was sent to Ireland in 1615 on the Jesuit mission and was based in Dublin for the next eleven years.

Shortly after arriving in Ireland and at the request of his protestant friend Sir Piers Crosby (qv), he drew up a brief outline of the fundamentals of the catholic faith. Crosby brought this statement to James Ussher (qv), at that time professor of divinity at TCD and rector of Finglas. Malone then wrote a challenge for Ussher, asking of the protestant clergy when it was that the catholic church had fallen into error and how was it that the protestant faith could be true if it rejected a number of tenets held by the early church. Crosby brought this statement to Ussher and a relatively amicable private correspondence ensued between the two clerics as they debated the tenets of the early fathers of the church. Eventually, in 1624 Ussher published an expanded response to Malone's initial challenge. As the publication of catholic literature was prohibited in Ireland, Malone left for the Spanish Netherlands in 1626 and then arranged for the publication at Douai of his A Reply to Mr. James Ussher his answer (1627). In the Reply Malone details disagreements among protestant theologians and argues that the contrasting unity of the catholic church was the surest sign of the rightness of its claim to be the one true church. He notes that whereas previously protestant divines had based their arguments solely on scripture, they have more recently come to agree with the catholic position that the church fathers constitute an important religious authority. Controversially he dedicated the Reply to Charles I and declared that not even the pope could draw the catholics of Ireland from their obedience to their rightful king. Such fulsome expressions of loyalty met with the disapproval of many of Malone's fellow clergy and compatriots. The Reply eventually found its way into circulation in Dublin c.1629–30, after which, at Ussher's behest, three protestant writers published between 1632 and 1641 rejoinders to Malone's work, each dealing with a different topic in the debate.

After the publication of the Reply, Malone was sent to Rome to act as procurator of the Irish Jesuits there. From 1637 to 1647 he was rector of the Irish college in Rome and seems to have performed this task with great distinction. On hearing that Malone intended resigning as rector, the Jesuit superior in Ireland, Thomas Nugent, wrote to Rome in March 1641 begging that Malone remain at his post. Nonetheless he did resign in 1642, but remained in the college as prefect of studies until 1647.

He returned to Ireland that year to become superior of the Jesuit mission in Nugent's stead and soon found himself caught up in the political turmoil of those times. In May 1648 the papal nuncio to Ireland, GianBattista Rinuccini (qv), excommunicated all those who adhered to the truce between the supreme council of the Catholic Confederation and the protestant forces in Munster. He also prohibited church services and the normal administration of the sacraments throughout Ireland. This act divided the catholic laity and clergy and put Malone in a very difficult position. On one hand, the Irish Jesuits were predominantly the sons of wealthy Old English landowners, a group who broadly sympathised with the supreme council. Malone himself was Old English and supported the truce with Inchiquin. Indeed, he appears to have opposed the admission of Gaelic Irish clergy into the Jesuits and, unusually for a catholic clergyman, spoke no Irish. Given these views, it is not surprising that his relations with Rinuccini, whose most reliable supporters tended to be Gaelic Irish, had been tense. However, on the other hand, the Jesuit order stood for obedience to the pope above all else, and could hardly defy his representative in Ireland.

Malone finessed the situation with some skill, but little success, by ordering the Irish Jesuits to follow the example of their diocesan bishop regarding the nuncio's interdict. As most of the Jesuit houses were located in the dioceses of bishops who supported the supreme council this meant that, in effect, the Jesuit order did not observe the interdict. Only in Limerick did the Jesuit house defy the local bishop, and by implication Malone, by observing the interdict. Moreover, many Jesuits actively encouraged the supreme council's defiance of the nuncio and in August 1648 six leading Jesuits signed a declaration supporting the supreme council. At some point in late 1648, Malone visited Rinuccini in Galway city in an effort to convince him of his good intentions. However, the nuncio regarded Malone's behaviour as treachery and believed that the Jesuits played a major role in the failure of his excommunication to defeat the supreme council.

Meanwhile, the Jesuit general in Rome, Vincenzo Carafa, ordered Malone to travel to Bordeaux to explain his behaviour (which he declined to do) and sent Mercure Verdier to Ireland as Jesuit visitor, to ascertain the situation in Ireland. After meeting Rinuccini in Galway, Verdier travelled to Kilkenny to hear Malone and his supporters state their case. Recognising the depth of opposition to Rinuccini within the order, Verdier did not remove Malone from his position, and absolved the Irish Jesuits from Rinuccini's censures. The latter act angered the Jesuits who held that Rinuccini's interdict was invalid.

By the spring of 1650 Malone was in Waterford city, which was being besieged by Cromwellian forces. A plague broke out and Malone and other Jesuits were active tending to the sick and dying. The same year, he was replaced by Thomas Nugent as head of the Jesuit mission in Ireland. Following the fall of Waterford in 1651, Malone went into hiding and was eventually captured in Dublin in 1654. Initially sentenced to death, this was commuted to transportation to Barbados, before he was simply put on a ship for Cadiz in 1655. On 27 October 1655 he was appointed rector of the Irish college at Seville. However, his health was failing and most of the work was carried out by his colleague John Ussher, who succeeded Malone as rector following his death in Seville on 13 August 1656.

C. R. Elrington and J. H. Todd, The whole works of James Ussher, 17 vols (1847–64), iii, 3–5; W. J. Battersby, The Jesuits in Ireland (1854), 70–72; Annie Hutton, The embassy in Ireland (1873), 399, 413, 468–9, 473–5; Michael J. Hynes, The mission of Rinuccini (1932), 264–5, 297; Comment. Rinucc., vi, 139–40; D.Cath.B., ix, 573; Francis Finegan, ‘Irish rectors at Seville, 1619–1687’, IER, ser. 5., no. 106 (July–Dec. 1966), 45–63; D. Gaffney, ‘The practice of religious controversy in Dublin, 1600–41’, W. J. Sheils and D. Wood (ed.), The churches, Ireland and the Irish (1989), 145–58; Louis McRedmond, To the greater glory (1991), 49, 70–73, 78–9, 82–4; Tadhg Ó hAnnracháin, Catholic reformation in Ireland (2002), 241–3; Alan Ford, James Ussher (2005), 62, 67–8

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
William Malone (1647-1650)
William Malone was born at Dublin on 6th February, 1586. After studying humanities and rhetoric at Douay, he entered the Novitiate of Sant' Andrea in Rome on 24th September, 1606. He studied philosophy at the Roman College, and theology at Evora and Coimbra in Portugal. Returning to Ireland in 1615, he was stationed in the district of Dublin. Soon after he became engaged in a controversy with James Usher, afterwards Protestant Primate. Usher's book, “An Answer to a Challenge made by a Jesuite in Ireland”, 1625, was triumphantly refuted by Fr Malone in a work entitled “A Reply to Fr James Usher, his Answer”, published at Douay in 1627, which reduced Usher to silence and encouraged Catholics greatly. In 1620 Fr Malone was made a Consultor of the Mission. On 11th April, 1624, he made his solemn profession of four vows. In 1626 he was sent as Procurator to Rome. When the administration of the Irish College, Rome, was given to the Society of Jesus by the will of the founder, Cardinal Ludovisi (1635), Fr Malone was selected to become Rector, but various obstacles arose which prevented him taking up that duty until 10th December, 1637. During his term of office he secured for the College the house in the Via Baccina, where it remained till the suppression of the Society. He ceased to be Rector on 1st February, 1642, but remained on as Prefect of Studies and Confessor till 20th April, 1647, when he was appointed Superior of the Irish Mission. During the dissensions that arose among Catholics on the occasion of the Nuncio Rinuccini's censures, he was a strong partisan of the Ormondist faction, and was in consequence denounced to Rome by the Nuncio. The General on 5th September, 16148, appointed a Visitor of the Irish Mission, and ordered Fr Malone to withdraw quietly to France. The Visitor, Fr Maurice Verdier, who arrived at Galway on 28th December, 1648, reported that it would be inadvisable to remove him just at that time. By the death of the General, on 8th June, 1649, all changes of Superiors were, with the approbation of the Holy See, suspended till a new General should be elected. Fr. Francis Piccolomini was elected on 21st December, 1649, and a few weeks later Fr Malone's Socius, Fr George Dillon, was appointed Superior of the Mission.

William Malone (1654)
Fr William Malone, who acted as Vice-Superior of the Irish Mission when Fr. William St Leger was exiled, was appointed Superior of the Mission for the second time on 27th June, 1654, but the General's letter to that effect can hardly have reached him before he, too, was tracked down by spies. To save his host he delivered himself up, and was sentenced to death. This sentence was afterwards changed to one of transportation to the Barbadoes; but just before he was put on board a ship sailing thither, another order arrived that he should be handed over to the captain of a ship bound for Cadiz. After many adventures he arrived there, and was appointed Rector of the Irish College at Seville on 27th October, 1655. But worn out by hardships he died there on 18th August, 1656, regretting the crown of martyrdom had escaped him.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father William Malone 1586-1656
William Malone was born in Dublin on February 6th 1586. After pursuing his studies at Douai, he entered the Socirty in Rome in 1606.
Returning to Ireland as a priest, he was stationed in Dublin where, like Fr Fitzsimon before him, he engaged in controversy with the Protestants, and became the great champion of the Catholics. He made his name in a clash with James Usher, afterwards Protestant Primate. The latter published a book entitled “An Answer to a Challenge made by a Jesuit in Ireland”. Fr Malone replied with his famous work “A Reply to Mr James Usher, his Answer”, published at Douai in 1627, which reduced Usher to silence and greatly encouraged the Catholics.

Fr Malone was the first Rector if the Irish College in Rome, when that institution was willed to the Jesuits by its founder, Cardinal Ludovisi in 1637. Ten years later Fr Malone was appointed Superior of the Irish Mission.

During the dissensions which arose among Catholics during Rinuccini’s mission, Fr Malone sided quite definitely with the Ormondist faction. As a result, he was denounced to Rome by the Nuncio, and the General appointed a Visiitor, Fr Verdier, to inquire into the state of affairs in Ireland. The General had in fact ordered Fr Malone to withdraw to the continent. It is interesting to note that the Visitor, after his investigations, advised against this course.

On the death of the General, his successor Fr Piccolini appointed Fr George Dillon as Superior in 1649. When Fr William St Leger, the next Superior after Fr Dillon was banished from Ireland, Fr Malone acted as Vice Superior, and was himself again appointed Superior in 1654. However, he was tracked down by spies, and to save his host he gave himself up.

He was banished to the Barbadoes, but the order was changed, and instead he was sent to Cadiz. On his arrival at Cadiz he was appointed Rector of the Irish College in Seville, but worn out by the hardships, he died there on August 18th 1656, regretting the crown of martyrdom which had escaped him.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MALONE, WILLIAM, a native of Dublin : enrolled himself at Rome, in 1606, amongst the Children of St. Ignatius. After pursuing his studies in that city, and finishing them in Portugal, he was ordered to the Irish Mission, to which during nearly a quarter of a century he rendered good service by his splendid talents, apostolic zeal, and extraordinary prudence. Recalled from Dublin, where he was Superior of his brethren, in the early part of the year 1635, to preside over the Irish College of St. Patrick at Rome, founded by Cardinal Ludovisi, he continued its Rector during the space of several years. Of his talents for government his brethren had formed the highest opinions. In a letter now before me addressed by F. Robert Nugent, the Superior of the Irish Mission, to the General Vitelleschi, of the 14th of March, 1641, he earnestly conjures him “not to yield to his petition of being released from the Rectorship of the College, however painful such pre-eminence may be that he knows no one at present qualified to succeed him in that office that there is not one of his brethren so conversant with the state of this Kingdom and Mission none so thoroughly acquainted with the character of the Irish youth as F. Malone”. On the 23rd of December, 1647, F. Malone was appointed Superior of the Irish Mission in the place of the said F. Nugent. His superiority fell in most difficult times.
In a letter dated Waterford, the l5th of March, 1649, he says, how thankful he should be to be relieved from it that the burthen was heavier on his shoulders than Mount Etna, insomuch that he could say with the Apostle (2 Cor. i. 8 ), he “was even weary of life”. Naturally of a most placid disposition, he found it impossible, during the period of the Interdict, to give satisfaction to the Party supporting the Nuncio, John Baptist Rinuccini * (a prelate ignorant of the country, and of very high pretensions ), and the conflicting interests of the supreme Council at Kilkenny. During the siege of Waterford, he was in the town : on its capture by the enemies of the Catholic Faith, he was apprehended and sent into banishment. On reaching Seville his talents for government were put in requisition, as Rector of F. Gregory’s College in that city. There he consummated his course of usefulness by the death of the righteous, in August, 1656, act. 70.
F. Malone will always rank among the ablest Champions of Orthodoxy in that immortal work entitled “A Reply to Mr James Ushers His Answere”, 4to. 1627, pp. 717. It was printed at Douay; but F. Southwell incorrectly fixes the date of publication to the year 1608. The admirable dedication of the work to King Charles I is abundant evidence of the Author’s loyalty and undivided Allegiance, as well as of his Patriotism. Harris’s notice of this truly learned work satisfies me, that he had never ventured to read it. See p. 130, Book I. Writers of Ireland. Doctor Synge, Archbishop of Tuam, and Dr. Joshua Hoyle, would have consulted their literary fame, had they not attempted to grapple with F. Malone.

  • The Latin Report of his Nunciature in Ireland is in the Holkam Library, and as translated by Archdeacon Glover, may be read in the Catholic Miscellany of October, November, and December, 1829. See also “Hiberaia Dominicana”, also Third Section of the “Political Catechism”, by T. Wyse, Esq. London, 1829. Lord Castleniaine, p. 277, of the “Catholic Apology”, 3rd edition, says that “The Pope on being informed of the Nuncio’s conduct, recalled him, and sent him to his Bishoprick, where he lived to his dying day in disgrace, and never had the least preferment afterwards”. He died on the 13th of December, 1653, aet. 61.

McCaughwell, Henry, 1605-1643, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1695
  • Person
  • 25 December 1605-20 April 1643

Born: 25 December 1605, Co Down
Entered: 04 October 1624, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: c.1630, Douai, France
Died: 20 April 1643, Dublin

Alias Connell

“Henry McCawell or Cavellus, was son of Isabella Carrin or Currin”.
Studied Humanities at Louvain and Philosophy at Douai, teacher of Arts, able to teach Philosophy and Theology

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Name in Latin “Cavellus”
Described as a most learned and zealous man; had been Professor of Philosophy; Imprisoned and flogged.
1642 Deported to France and returned to Ireland March 1643, and he died in Dublin a few days after return of hardship
Directly under “Henry” there are two further McCaughwells: Hugh and John, both apparently born in Down, and both of whom Entered 1624 in Belgium. (These are possible duplicate entries for Henry??)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of William and Isabelle née Carrin
He has previously studied Humanities under the Augustinians at Louvain and the Jesuits at Antwerp and graduated MA at Douai where he studied Philosophy under the Jesuits, before Entry 04 October 1624 at Tournai
1626-1630 After First Vows he was sent to complete his studies at Douai and was Ordained 1630 there
1631 He was sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence as Operarius. As an able Philosopher and Theologian, he ran classes in Philosophy and Theology for prospective seminarians, preparing them for Colleges in Europe.
1641 He was in the city when it was taken over by the Puritans 1641. Matthew O’Hartegan (in a letter of 05 August 1642 to the General) described McCavell’s fate “He was arrested, beaten with rods in the market place and put on board a ship bound for France with eighteen other priests. He was ill and half paralysed at the time. He found refuge at La Rochelle, but he was so determined that he was already planning a return to Ireland. He did take a ship the following Spring but died within a few days of his arrival in the city 20 April 1643.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Henry Cavell SJ 1605-1643
In Dublin early in the year 1643 died Fr Henry Cavell, or Caughwell, a man of great learning and zeal for souls.

He taught Philosophy in the Dublin Residence, for we read that Fr Stephen Gellous studied philosophy for two and a half years under him. Though confined to bed, he was dragged by the Parliamentarians from the Dublin Residence in 1642. As he was unable to stand, he was placed in a chair, more for mockery than for ease, and subjected to brutal assaults of the soldiery. He was beaten with cudgels and thrown into the ship with nineteen other religious and priests and transported to La Rochelle, France.

In La Rochelle he was most charitably received by Fr Destraded and given a Brother to assist him. No sooner was he restored to some degree of health then urged by his burning zeal, he hastened back once more to the scene of his labours. On the passage back he encountered a storm which lasted 21 days. He was completely broken down by his sufferings and died in Dublin a few days after landing, a true martyr of charity and zeal.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CAVELL, HENRY, is described as “Vir doctissimus et animarum zelo plenus”. He was apprehended in Dublin, dragged by soldiers from his sick bed though suffering from Palsy, severely scourged “virgis primum bene caesus” and then put on board a vessel with nineteen Religious and Priests, and landed at Rochelle. The Rector of the Jesuits College there paid him every charitable attention, and by great care and the best medical advice, gradually succeeded in restoring him to a state of convalescence. As soon as he could, the Rev. Father hastened to the scene of his former labors; but within a few days after his return, early in 1613, fell a victim to his zeal and charity. F. G. Dillon says in a letter of the 3rd of August, 1643, that he had encoun tered a storm on his passage back which lasted twenty-one days. “Sic verus Christi Confessor obiit”.

Moore, John, 1582-1652, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1758
  • Person
  • 1582-11 August 1652

Born: 1582, Duleek, County Meath
Entered: 25 April 1600, Coimbra, Portugal - Lusitabiae Province (LUS)
Ordained: c 1611, Coimbra, Portugal
Final vows: 1624
Died: 11 August 1652, Galway Residence

Alias De Moura

1642 At Drogheda, and subsequently appointed Chaplain to Sir Richard Blake (Oranmore, Co Galway, Mayor of Galway twice and Parliamentarian)
1649 Superior Galway Residence
in 1650 Catalogue
He was a very learned, charitable and humble man; Superior in Connaught; Forty years on the Irish Mission, and imprisoned for the Catholic faith.
Peter Walsh in his “Remonstrance” calls him “an old venerable Jesuit and skilful exorcist” (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1642 At Drogheda, and subsequently appointed Chaplain to Sir Richard Blake (Oranmore, Co Galway, Mayor of Galway twice and Parliamentarian)
1649 Superior Galway Residence
in 1650 Catalogue
He was a very learned, charitable and humble man; Superior in Connaught; Forty years on the Irish Mission, and imprisoned for the Catholic faith.
Peter Walsh in his “Remonstrance” calls him “an old venerable Jesuit and skilful exorcist” (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Humanities at the Irish College Lisbon before Ent 25 April 1600 Coimbra
After First Vows - which he completed at Braga College - he was sent for studies to Coimbra (1602-1605), did regency as Minister at Irish College Lisbon companioning Thomas White, and returned to Coimbra for Theology and was Ordained there c1611
1612-1613 Spiritual Father and Confessor at Irish College Lisbon
1613/14 Sent to Ireland and Connaught Residence.
1625 He was sent to Dublin Residence to act as Master of Novices for the four priest candidates. He was later at Drogheda, but had to leave there when it fell to the Puritans in 1642
1649 His whereabouts after Drogheda are unknown, but he was Superior of the Galway residence in 1649, and he died there 11 August 1652

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MORE, JOHN. He was living at Drogheda, in 1642, but in October that year, succeeded in escaping thence from Puritanical fury. Subsequently he was appointed Chaplain to Sir Richard Blake. When Pere Verdier visited him in the early part of the year 1649, he found him Superior of his Brethren at Galway, and reported him as being a Septuagenarian, as a man of consummate probity, and conspicuous for charity and humility. I fear it will be nearly impossible to ascertain the date of his death.

Mulcaile, James Philip, 1727-1801, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1780
  • Person
  • 06 May 1726-08 December 1801

Born: 06 May 1726, County Kilkenny
Entered: 23 January 1748, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 07 March 1761, Paris, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1765
Died 08 December 1801, Smithfield, Dublin

Son of Michael and Ellinor Shee
First Vows 21 January 1750 (Arrêt de la Cour)
Taught Humanities and Rhetoric
1757 In College of Paris
1761 At Paris in 4th year Theology
1766 Book “Peregrinatio Laputensis” begun or finished 28 November 1766. Now in George’s Hill Convent in Dublin. Founder of this house or helped establish it.
1788 Bishop Carroll writes to him
1791 SJD Rector St Michan’s, Dublin, he condemned the Oath of Allegiance
1795 Living at Mary’s Lane, called Dr Mulcail

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Mulcaile is pronounced Mulhall
Went to France aged 9. Son of Michael and Ellinor née Shee. Was related to the O’Shee’s and Clarke (Duke of Feltre) and the famous Father Clarke SJ, of Kilkenny, of whom Foley’s Collectanea and “Records SJ tell such marvellous things.
1750 First Vows 24 January 1750
1763 At Collège de Paris (Arrêt de la Cour de Paarlement de Paris) and then sent to Ireland, and assisted the PPs in Dublin for many years, and helped establish Miss Mullaly’s Presentation Convent, George’s Hill, where he died and is buried in the vault of that Convent. (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
1773 Vicar General after the Suppression. (cf Dublin Evening Post 10 December 1801)
He helped found the Convent on George’s Hill. There is a portrait of him at the Convent and a cast of his fine features at Milltown Park.
Writer and profoundly versed in Greek literature. Translated Fellers “Catéchisme Philosophique”

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Michael and Elinor née Shee
Early education was in France from the age of eight. He studied Philosophy at Paris and received Minor Orders before Ent 23 January 1748 Paris
After First Vows he spent seven years Regency at Caen and then resumed studies at Paris where he was Ordained 07 March 1761
1761 Society dissolved in France as he finished his studies, so he stayed with relatives in Paris
1763 Returned to Ireland. Appointed to the Dublin Residence, and served as a Curate at St Mary’s Lane until the Suppression in 1774. he was incardinated into the Dublin Diocese working ay St Michan’s until his death, and he became later Vicar General and Archdeacon of Dublin. He actively promoted the introduction of the Presentation Order into his parish and in 1787 purchased the site of the future convent of George's Hill. His last place of residence was a house adjoining the convent and when he died 08/12/1801 he was buried in the vault of the Convent Chapel.
During the sequestration the Jesuit houses in Paris, he succeeded in rescuing one of its recently acquired treasure - a Crucifix used by St Francis Xavier during his early years as a missioner in India. He presented this famous crucifix to George's Hill convent where it is still preserved.
He is also known for a translation of Abbé Feller’s “Philosophical Catechism”.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father James Philip Mulcaile SJ 1726-1801
In Dublin, during the month of December 1801 died Fr James Philip Mulcaile at the age of 75.

He was born in Kilkenny on May 1st 1726. At the early age on nine he was sent to France where in 1748 he joined the Society.

Returning to Ireland in 1763 he worked zealously until the Suppression of the Society. Afterwards he assisted the Dublin priests, mainly in St Michan’s parish. He had a great deal to do with the foundation of the Presentation Convent, George’s Hill, where a fine portrait of him in oils may be seen to this day, and where his mortal remains are buried in the vaults.

He was an excellent scholar and published an English Translation of Feller’s “Catechisms Philosophicus” in three volumes. He is also said to have translated “Gulliver’s =Travels” into Greek, which was used as a textbook in Fr Betagh’s school.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note : John Philip Mulcaile
Those marked with
were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MULCAILLE, JAMES, PHILIP, was born in Kilkenny, 1st of May, 1726, or 1727; in the 19th year of his age went to France : where he joined the Society ; returned to Ireland in 1763, with his pupil and kinsman Mr. Bray : for very many years assisted the Parish Priests in Dublin. In the establishment of the convent of the Presentation of George’s hill, he lent his best support to Miss Mullaly he died in their convent on the 8th of December, 1801. That he was an excellent scholar and profoundly versed in Greek Literature, appears to be generally admitted. We have from his pen an English Translation of Abbe Feller’s “Catechisme Philosophique”, in 3 Vols. Dublin, 1800. It is pleasing to observe in the beginning of the 1st Volume, the subscription list for nearly 600 copies.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

Murphy, Michael, 1680-1736, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1803
  • Person
  • 29 September 1680-12 July 1736

Born: 29 September 1680, Balrothery, County Dublin
Entered: 11 April 1703, Lisbon, Portugal - Lusitaniae Province (LUS)
Ordained: c 1712, Coimbra, Portugal
Final Vows: 14 February 1736
Died: 12 July 1736, Dublin Residence

1705-1711 At Coimbra studying Philosophy and Theology. Teaching Greek, Latin and Hebrew. Progress very good
1716 Came to Ireland
1736 Superior in Dublin
“Good disposition, learned, inclined to work. Modest, humble, meek and always docile to Superiors directions. Esteemed by people and clergy. Has an uncle a Bishop. Now in Dublin and helping PP. Is exposed to dangers in these duties. Has a harsh voice and weak chest, consequently not fit for preaching.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Much esteemed by priests and people, and his Superior. His uncle who was a learned and pious Bishop had a high opinion of him. Of solid judgements, modest, mild and humble. Learned and hardworking.
Studied four years Philosophy and four Theology after First Vows.
1717 Ran great risk by instructing the young in the chief town of the region where lived. Was teaching Latin and Greek fo over five years at the time.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
He was an nephew of Edward Murphy, Bishop of Kildare and Leighlin, and later Archbishop of Dublin
Unclear where he did his Noviceship, but it is most likely at Coimbra.
After First Vows he was sent to Coimbra for Philosophy, and then spent two years Regency teaching Hebrew and Greek.
1709-1712 He then returned to Coimbra for Theology and he was Ordained there c 1712
1713 Sent to Ireland, he he re-established with Fr. Milo Byrne the Dublin Jesuit school - which had been in abeyance since the 1690s - and for the next quarter of a century worked at Mary's Lane Chapel. He also worked closely with Canon John Harold preparing young men for seminaries in Europe. A Consultor of the Mission and Superior of the Dublin Residence, he was frequently recommended for the Superiorship of the Mission itself and was a valued adviser of the General on matters concerning the Mission. He died in Dublin 12 July 1736
He was one of five Jesuits arrested and tried in Dublin, November 1718 on the information of a Portuguese Jew Garcia, who had come to Ireland hoping to earn a living priest-hunting. However, Murphy was set free

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Michael Murphy SJ 1679-1757
Michael Murphy was a Dublin man born in 1679. He became a Jesuit in 1702.

His studies completed, he ran a most successful school in Dublin. One of the most brilliant pupils was Peadar Neachtan, afterwards a Jesuit, son of the poet Seán Ó Neachtain.

Fr Murphy was highly praised by Blessed Oliver Plunkett as being a good theologian, a learned and hardworking man, an excellent religious, possessed of great talent and an eloquent preacher in the Irish language. He was so esteemed by the people and the secular priests, as well as by his Superiors, for his solid judgement, his gentle disposition, and his courage in exposing himself to great risks to instruct the young during those days of the Penal Laws. Judging from Archbishop Plunkett’s commendation, Fr Murphy must have taught schools in Drogheda.

He died in 1757.

Netterville, Nicholas, 1622-1697, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1824
  • Person
  • 02 February 1622-30 December 1697

Born: 02 February 1622, Dowth, County Meath
Entered: 10 Octpber 1641, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Final Vows: 12 January 1659
Died: 30 December 1697, Dublin Residence

Son of Nicholas (Viscount of Dowth and Baron of Belgart) and Helena Bathe

Nephew of Robert Netterville, RIP 1644 and older brother Christopher Nettweville, RIP 1651

Studied Humanities at Antwerp and Rhetoric at Lille
1645 Not in Catalogue
1649 In 2nd Theology at Bourges - teaching Grammar and Humanities, talent in speculative sciences
1655 At La Flèche College teaching Grammar and Philosophy
1658 Not in Catalogue; At End of Catalogue but not in body along with 5 others (Peter Creagh, William O’Rian, Nicholas Nugent, Stephen Brown and Nicholas Punche) “docent hi”
1661 at La Flèche - a priest, taught Grammar. Good teacher of Philosophy and Theology. Suitable for Missions
1641 At Bruges College teaching Philosophy
1665 before this year went to Ireland with Nicholas Nugent and returned from France to Ireland in 1666
1666 - see Wilsons “Friar Disciplined” p146-7

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
8th son of Son of Nicholas Viscount Netterville de Dowth Baron De Ballegart and Eleanor (Hellena) née Bathe, a niece or grandniece of the Earl of Kildare, who had died in the Tower in 1586. Younger brother of Christopher. Nephew of William Bathe on his mother’s side.
Studied Humanities at Antwerp under the Jesuits, and among his teachers were : Giles Tibant, Ernest Cason and Albert Van Wilstren. He then spent five months Rhetoric under Fr Comblett SJ at Lille. He was admitted to the Society by the FLA Provincial Andrew Judoci 29 September 1641 and then went to Mechelen 10 October 1641 (Mechelen Album Vol iii p 254)
Taught Philosophy and Theology in France for many years
On being sent to Ireland he became Chaplain to the Duke of Tyrconnel, Viceroy of Ireland (Richard Talbot)
1665 Sent to Ireland and was a most agreeable Preacher (HIB CAT 1666 - ARSI). He was a Theologian and “concionator gratissimus”.
1670 Irish Bishops name him fit to govern the Kildare Diocese, and as “doctrina ac verbi Dei praedicatione celebris”,
Archbishop Peter Talbot says of him in his “Haeresis Blackloana” p 19 “The opinion of such a man as Fr Netterville is as of much weight as the other Theologians whom I consulted; for that man has been a great glory of his nation on account of the extraordinary penetration of his genius and the learning with which he lectured very many years in the most celebrated Colleges of all France” Peter Walsh, his enemy, says of him :He had the reputation of a great divine, by title a Doctor, ad by office a Professor of Divinity for some years in France” (Foley’s Collectanea)
1679 He was proscribed by name and deported 02 March 1697 - “He was lodging at the Quay in Dr Cruice’s house” as we learn from the report of a spy, which is preserved in St Patrick’s Library MSS Vol 3.1.18
He was Superior of the Dublin Residence when he died (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Viscount Netterville of Dowth and Helena née Bathe, (sister of Father William Bathe) and brother of Christopher
1643-1646 After First Vows he was sent for studies to Louvain, and Antwerp
1648-1652 He was then sent to Bourges for Theology and graduated DD (Ordained?)
1652-1664 He taught Theology at Rennes, Bourges and Rheims until 1664
1664 Sent to Ireland and Dublin district and later in the City where he became Superior of the Dublin Residence. He was a staunch opponent of Peter Walsh's “Loyal Remonstrance” and Taaffe’s bogus legation from the Holy See. He was arrested and deported during the Titus Oates Plot
1684 He returned to Ireland and at the Dublin Residence until his death 30 December 1697

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Nicholas Netterville SJ 1622-1697
Nicholas Netterville was the 8th son of Viscount Netterville. He had two brothers, Robert and Christopher, also Jesuits.

Nicholas was born at Dowth, County Meath in 1621, and he entered the Society at Mechelen in 1641, and afterwards taught Philosophy and Theology with great distinction.

In October 1678, when he was Rector of the Dublin Residence, he was arrested in connection with the Titus Oates Plot, and banished as a result. He returned in 1686 and became Chaplain to the Duek of Tyrconnell, then Viceroy of Ireland. During the Williamite period, he was prescribed by name and banished again, but the sentence was never carried out and he continued his work in Ireland until 1697.

He gained a great reputation as a preacher, and was looked upon as a profound Theologian. Archbishop Talbot said of him : “The opinion of such a man as Father Netterville is of as much weight as that of all the other Theologians whom I consulted”.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NETTERVILLE, NICHOLAS, younger brother of F. Christopher, (being the eighth son) for many years taught Philosophy in France with distinguished credit. Recalled to the Irish Mission, he was appointed Chaplain to the Duke of Tyrconnell, Viceroy of Ireland. He died in Dublin late in the year 1607, where he had been Superior of his Brethren.

Netterville, Robert, 1583-1684, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1825
  • Person
  • 23 October 1583-17 July 1644

Born: 23 October 1583. County Meath
Entered: 23 October 1604, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM) & Naples, Italy - Neapolitan Province (NAP)
Ordained: 1610, Naples, Italy
Final vows: 1624
Died: 17 July 1644, Drogheda, County Louth - Described as "Martyr"

Uncle of Nicholas Nettweville, RIP 1697 and Christopher Netterville, RIP 1651

Originally received into Society by Fr Bernard Olivier on 30 August 1604. Then received 23 October 1604 at Novitiate in Rome , and after 1st Probation 22 November 1604 went to Naples to continue Aged 22
1606-1611 In Naples College studying Logic, 3 years Philosophy and 3 Theology
1617 In Meath Age 35 Soc 13
1621 CAT In Meath Age 38 Soc 17 Mission 7. Strength middling. Good talent and judgement. Not very circumspect. Sanguineus and rather lazy. A Preacher
1625 At Irish College Lisbon
1622-1637 In Dublin district
Master of Arts, Minister 3 years, Irish Mission 12

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was Minister in Naples
1615 Came to Ireland from Sicily
1621 In Kildare
Dragged from his bed by the rebel Parliamentary soldiers at Drogheda 15 June 1649, cruelly beaten with clubs, causing his death four days layer aged 67. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS, IER. Tanner’s “Martyr SJ” and Drew’s “Fasti SJ”)
A most meritorious Missioner (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1606-1612 After First Vows he studied at Naples where he was Ordained 1610, ad then he did for two further years of study at Naples.
1613-1614 Made Tertianship at the College of Massa.
1614-1615 He was sent to Ireland with John Shee, but illness kept him at Bordeaux until 1615
1615-1623 Arrived in Ireland and the Dublin Residence, exercising Ministry in the surrounding Counties of Kildare and Meath.
1623-1625 He set out for Spain bringing a group of Irish Seminarians for the Irish Colleges. On arrival he secured interviews with the Ambassador of England and the secretary of the Prince of Wales for whom negotiations were in progress to conclude a marriage agreement with one of the Spanish Infantas. In these interviews he received reassurances that religious persecution would cease in Ireland as soon as the royal match was made. In August of that same year he went to the Irish College, Lisbon, and during his stay there was accused by the Archbishop of Cashel/Dublin of failing in impartiality with regard to the admission of students from the four provinces of Ireland to the Irish Colleges of the Peninsula. One outcome was that he was called back to Ireland in the Spring of 1625
1625-1641 Returned to Ireland and Dublin until the City was controlled by the Puritans
1641 He was based in North Leinster. He was captured and put to death by Scots Covenanters under Munroe who made an incursion as far as North Westmeath in June and July 1644.
The correct Date of Death is 17 July 1644. Some Jesuit writers gave his year of death at 1649 to coincide with the massacre at Drogheda. It is probable that the Roman necrologist mistook Netterville for Robert Bathe, who died in Kilkenny 1649

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Robert Netterville SJ 1583-1649
Robert Netterville was born in Meath in 1583, brother of Viscount Netterville and uncle of Frs Nicholas and Christopher Netterville. He became a Jesuit in 1604 in Italy.

For the rest of his life he was stationed at our Residence in Drogheda. When that city was besieged by Cromwell, Fr Robert was now an old man and confined to bed with his infirmities. But old age and infirmity did not save him from the fury of the Cromwellians. He was dragged from his bed and trailed along the ground, being violently knocked against each obstacle that presented itself on the way. Then he was beaten with clubs, and when many of his bones were broken he was cast on the highway. Catholics came during the night, bore him away and hid him somewhere. Four days after, having fought the good fight, he departed as we would expect to receive the martyr’s crown.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NETTERVILLE, ROBERT. This venerable old man, rich in labors and merits, was dragged from his bed by the Parliamentary soldiers at Drogheda, on the 15th of June, 1619, and so unmercifully beaten with clubs, that he died four days later “Per domum raptatus, tum fustibus contusus, effractisque ad collum et humcros ossibus (15 Junii, 1649) relictus est semivivus, et quarto post die abiit è vita”.
Ex libro Collectancorum signato F. olim in Archiv, Coll. Angl. Romae. - See Tanner , Drews.

Plunket, John, 1588-1643, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1988
  • Person
  • 01 October 1588-24 November 1643

Born: 01 October 1588, Dublin
Entered: 15 August 1611, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 14 April 1618, Douai, France
Died: 24 November 1643, Wexford Residence, Wexford

Mother was Margaret Bagnall, clearly brother of Henry
Studied Humanities in Schools of the Society at Antwerp and Tournai, and Philosophy at Douai
1615 At Cambrai studying Philosophy
1617 In Belgium
1619 At Douai teaching Greek
1621 Catalogue A native of Meath Age 33 Soc 10 Mission 1. Health middling. As he only came lately he is hardly known to us.
1622 In Dublin District
1637 ROM Catalogue Talent, judgement and prudence good. Cholericens. Middling proficiency in letters. Fit to teach Humanities.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Professor of Greek at Douai;
1617 In Belgium (Irish Ecclesiastical Record)
1620 Came to Ireland and was in Dublin Diocese 1621 and 1622

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Christopher and Margaret née Bagnall and brother of Henry
Early education with the Jesuits at Antwerp and Douai before Ent 15 August 1611 Tournai
1613-1615 After First Vows he was sent to teach Greek at Tournai for two years
1615-1619 He was then sent to Douai for Theology and Ordained there 14 April 1618
1620/21 Sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence, but worked mostly outside the city.
1627-1641 A brief mission at Waterford, but was back in Dublin when he appears to have been recalled to Dublin as a result of a letter from the General who wished to have the Mission Superior Robert Nugent reprimand him for some indiscretion. He remained in Dublin until c 1641
1641 He was sent to the Wexford Residence where he died at Wexford 24 November 1643

Plunkett, Thomas, 1627-1697, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1992
  • Person
  • 1627-26 February 1697

Born: 1627, Dublin
Entered: 11 November 1647, Kilkenny
Ordained: c 1654, Bordeaux, France
Died: 26 February 1697, Dublin Residence, Dublin

1650-1653 Studied Theology at Bordeaux (1651 Age 25 Soc 3 - had good talent and proficiency more than mediocre. Fit to teach Grammar and Philosophy, and above mediocre in Theology)
1653-1654 Studied Theology at Poitiers
1654-1655 Taught Grammar ad Philosophy at La Rochelle
1655 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar
1656-1660 At La Rochelle, now a priest, Age 31 teaching Grammar
1660-1661 At Angoulême
1661-1662 At Agen
1663 Teaching 2nd Class at Bordeaux
1665 At Tulles Age 36
1666-1667 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar
1667-1669 At Loudun Operarius
1670 Goes to Ireland or from 1669

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1650 Sent for Theology to AQUIT

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
He had already completed his Philosophy studies before Ent 11 November 1647 Kilkenny
After First Vows was sent to Bordeaux for studies and was Ordained there c 1654
1655-1667 For the next twelve years he taught at various AQUIT Colleges and was an Operarius until he was sent to Ireland
1669 Sent to Ireland and Dublin, where he worked mostly outside the city until after the Oates Plot. He died at the Dublin Residence 27 February 1697 and was buried at the St. Catherine's churchyard

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
PLUNKETT, THOMAS. Began his Noviceship at Kilkenny. After taking the simple Vows he was sent, as I find in F. John Young’s letter, dated Galway, April 20th, 1650, with Daniel Dowgan, or Dugan, to the Province of Aquitaine, to study Theology. From that time until the announcement of his death in Dublin, on 26th February, 1697, I can learn nothing of his Biography.

Purcell, John, 1595-1657, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2014
  • Person
  • 22 June 1595-12 April 1657

Born: 22 June 1595, Dublin
Entered: 19 November 1618, Nancy, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)
Ordained: c 1623, Paris, France
Died: 12 April 1657, Irish College, Poitiers, France

Had studied Rhetoric and Philosophy at Douai and Rhetoric at Dijon c 1620
1622 At Pont-á-Mousson studying Philosophy or in Metaphysics or in FRA (the first I find since Holiwood and Richard Field) in 3td year Philosophy
1625 In College of Paris FRA studying Theology
1626 Catalogue In Ireland
1637 Catalogue Talent and judgement good, prudent and teaching is mediocre. Able to teach Humanities
1649 Catalogue is given at Dublin
1650 Catalogue DOB 1592, Ent 1620. Is a teacher, Confessor, Preacher and a Formed Coadjutor. Age 57. Came to Mission in 1627

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Knew Irish, English, French and Latin; Had taught Humanities and been a Confessor and Preacher for eighteen years (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI)
Hogan says Ent 1618, and death post 1650, stating that he had been in prison.
1642 A Missioner in Dublin, and still there 1649 in weak health (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Irish College Douai before Ent 19 November 1618 Nancy
1620-1621After First Vows he was sent to teach Rhetoric for a year at Dijon
1621-1622 He was then sent to Pont-à-Mousson for Philosophy
1622-1624 He was then sent for Theology to Paris and was Ordained there c 1623
1625/26 Sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence and was teaching until the closure of the school at Back Lane. In spite of the Puritan occupation and poor health, he continued to live in Dublin until 1649/50, when he was arrested, imprisoned and deported to France.
The General was especially solicitous of fate of the Dublin priests during the Cromwell regime, and he made arrangements for John to be received by AQUIT. He was sent then to Grand Collège Poitiers The Annual Letter of the Province of AQUIT said of him “Died at Poitiers, Father John Purcell, an Irish Father of singular virtue and zeal. He suffered three months of imprisonment and other hardships for the faith”

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
PURCELL, JOHN, was an active Missionary in Dublin in the autumn of 1642. At the end of February following I find that he had become an Invalid; but he was still living in that city in the summer of 1649, infirmae valetudinis et jam senior.

Queitrot, Robert, 1584-1629, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2016
  • Person
  • 1584-21 October 1629

Born: 1584, Dublin
Entered: 1604, Lisbon, Portugal - Lusitaniae province (LUS)
Ordained; c 1617, Coimbra, Portugal
Died; 21 October 1629, Dublin Residence

Alias Cotinho

1606 & 1611 At Coimbra College
1609 LUS CAT suggests Coutenho and Queitrott are not the same person :
Robert Queitrotus Dublin Age 20 in Society 4 years
Robert Coutinus Dublin Age 23 in Society 5 years
1611 CAT in Portugal studying Philosophy
1614 Teaching Greek & Hebrew at Coimbra
1617 in Portugal
1619 Had been at Coimbra 6 years
1622 at Santarem College teaching Greek and Hebrew
Son of Nichilas Queytrot Mayor of Dublin c1515??

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ
Had studied at Irish College Lisbon before Ent 1604 Lisbon
1606-1613 After First Vows he was sent to Coimbra for studies in Latin, Philosophy and one year of Theology
1613-1619 He was then sent to teach Hebrew and Greek also at Coimbra for six years. He seems to have been Ordained priest by 1617 without having completed the usual studies
1619-1622 Sent to studies at Coimbra again, and was still doing them while also an Operarius at Santarém 1621-1622
1622-1623 Made Tertianship at Lisbon
1623 He was sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence. he was teaching Humanities at the school in Back Lane and working as an Operarius when he died October 1629

Quin, Thomas, 1603-1663, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2019
  • Person
  • 02 February 1603-07 August 1663

Born: 02 February 1603, Dublin
Entered: 02 September 1623, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 04 July 1628, Douai, France
Professed 16 May 1641
Died: 07 August 1663, Dublin

Superior of the Mission 1654-1657

Son of Genet Lattin
Studied Humanities at Antwerp, Philosophy at Douai, became an MA
1627 ROM Catalogue Good in all. Colericus. Fit to teach Philosophy and Theology
1649 Catalogue marked at Dublin
1650 Catalogue Age 47. Came to Mission 1631. Superior in Dublin and Waterford Residences some years. Prof of 4 Vows. Taught Humanities, Concinator and Confessor
1652 His report on Ireland is at Arundel - Gradwell’s MS III 567

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied Humanities and two years Philosophy before Ent 1623. Knew Latin, English, French and a little Irish
1629 or 1631 Sent to Ireland
Taught Humanities for a number of years; was a Preacher and Confessor; Superior of a Residence (HIB Catalogue 1650 - ARSI); Writer; Prisoner; Exile.
1642 In Dublin, an indefatigable missioner. He held his ground in Dublin with Fathers Latin and Purcel for years, disguised often as a private gentleman, soldier, peasant, ratcacther, baker, shoemaker, gardener etc to elude the Puritans.
When Superior of the Mission he wrote a brief Report on the condition of Irish Catholics in 1652 and 1656
1651, 1658 In Antwerp
1659 At Nantes (all above dates Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS) He is placed in BELG Catalogues at Professed House Antwerp, as Confessorr 1651-1652, and June 1658 and October 1659
Writes from Douai to Wadding 1639 (Foley’s Collectanea)
Mercure Verdier, Visitor to Irish Mission calls him a wonderful missioner “mirabilis operarius”.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Richard, a merchant, and Jennett née Latin
Had graduated MA at Douai before Entry 02 September 1623 Tournai
1625-1628 After First Vows he was sent for classical studies to Lille and then Theology at Douai, where he was Ordained 04/07/1628
1628-1631 Sent to Ireland and Dublin, where he taught Latin and directed the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin
1632-1633 Sent back to Belgium to complete his studies
1633-1645 Sent to Ireland and Dublin, and when the Puritans took control he managed to stay there undetected
1645-1651 Superior of Dublin Residence (ie., Superior of any Jesuits exercising Ministry in Leinster)
1651-1654 Sent to Antwerp as Procurator of Irish Mission
1654 Returned to Ireland to substitute for the Mission Superior who had been arrested 01 October 1654. He managed to remain undetected for two years, and during this time wrote two accounts on the state of the Irish Mission and Catholic Ireland
1656 About November he was captured and was to be confined to Inishbofin, but at the end of 1657 he was released on bail and then deported to the Continent
1658 He arrived in Paris in 03 January 1658, and once more became Procurator for the Irish Mission. On 17/8/1658 he was asked by the General to establish in Brittany a house of refuge for the fathers of the Irish Mission, and two months later secured a house at Solidor, a suburb of St Malo in October 1659. They opened a school for the children of Irish merchants, and this was later moved to Dinant. The attempt to found an Irish Jesuit house in Brittany was frustrated by opposition from the local French Jesuits and Quin and his companions were summoned back to Ireland in 1662. On his return he offered strong opposition to Peter Walsh’s “Remonstrance”.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Thomas Quin (1654-1657)
Thomas Quin, son of Richard Quin, a Dublin merchant, and Jennett Latin, was born at Dublin, on or about 2nd February, 1603. He went to Flanders in 1619; studied rhetoric at Antwerp and Douay and philosophy at Douay, where he obtained his degree of Master of Arts. He joined the Society at Tournay on 2nd September, 1623. After his noviceship his scholastic career is rather interrupted. He repeated his classical studies at Lille, and studied theology at Douay for two years, and was ordained priest on 4th July, 1628. He returned then to Ireland for a couple of years, during which time he taught Latin and directed the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin at Dublin. He went back to Belgium in 1631 to finish his theological studies, but after one year had to return to Ireland, where he completed then a few years later. He was stationed usually at Dublin, where he made his solemn profession of four vows on 16th May, 1641. He was one of the two or three Jesuits that succeeded in remaining in Dublin undetected during the Puritan regime. From 1645 to 1651 he was Superior of the Dublin Residence. Fr Maurice Verdier, the Visitor, in his report of 1649, says Fr Quin was one of two Fathers in Dublin, and adds: '”I have not seen him, but I hear he is a wonderful missioner”. At the general break-up in 1651 he was sent as Procurator of the Mission to Antwerp, where he remained three years. He was applied for by Fr. Malone, on his arrest, to act as his substitute, and set out on 1st October, 1654, from Belgium. He reached Ireland, and escaped capture for two years, during which he wrote two accounts of the state of the Mission and of the Catholics of Ireland. About the month of November, 1656, he fell into the hands of his enemies, and was to be confined in Inishbofin, but at the end of the year 1657 he was released on bail and banished to the Continent. He landed in France, and was in Paris on 3rd January, 1658.

Thomas Quin (1663)
When Fr Quin was banished at the end of 1657, he went first to Paris, and then soon after to the Professed House at Antwerp. During the Superiorship of Fr Richard Shelton he acted as Procurator of the Irish Mission in Europe. On 17th August, 1658, he was asked by the General to go to Brittany with a view to establishing there a house of refuge for the Fathers of the Irish Mission. He arrived in Nantes at the end of the year, and secured a house at Solidor, a suburb of St. Malo, in October, 1659. Here a school was opened for the children of Irish merchants, which was later transferred to Dinan, five leagues off. The opening of this house aroused much opposition, and Fr Quin and the other Irish Fathers returned to Ireland in October, 1662. On his arrival Fr Quin offered determined opposition to Peter Walsh's Remonstrance, On 10th February, 1663, he was appointed Superior of the Mission. He was in failing health at the time, and died at Dublin on 7th August, 1663.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Thomas Quin 1603-1663
Fr Thomas Quin, whop was twice Superior of the Irish Mission, was born in Dublin round about February 2nd 1603, the son of Richard Quin, a Dublin merchant and Jenett Latin. Having completed his studies on the Continent, he entered the Society at Tournai in 1623.

After his ordination in 1628 he returned to Ireland where he taught Latin and directed the Sodality of Our Lady in Dublin. He was one of the two or three Jesuits that succeeded in remaining in Dublin undetected during the Puritan regime.

From 1645-1651 he was Superior of the Dublin Residence. At the general breakup in 1651 he was sent as Procurator of the Mission to Antwerp, but returned at the request of Fr William Malone in 1654.

For two years he evaded the priest-hunters and managed to write two accounts of the Mission and of the Catholics in Ireland. He was banished to France in 1657, having acted as Superior of the Mission 1654-1657.

In 1658 he was sent by the General to open a house for the Fathers of the Irish Mission in Brittany. He secured a house at Solidor, a suburb of St Malo. Here he opened a school for the children of Irish merchants which was later transferred to Dinan. This aroused opposition, so he and the other Irish Fathers returned to Ireland, where Fr Quin was very outspoken in his opposition to Peter Walsh’s Remonstrance.

On February 10th 1663 he was appointed Superior of the Mission for the second time, but he was in failing health and died on August 7th 1663.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
QUIN, THOMAS. This worthy Jesuit was stationed in Dublin in 1642. In a letter of F. Robert Nugent, dated Manapia, (Waterford) 10th of October, 1642, he speaks highly of his unremitting zeal and charity that he was a source of comfort to the afflicted citizens that he was all to all, that he assumed occasionally the military uniform, now the habit of the gentry, occasionally the dress of a peasant, to elude Puritan vigilance, and to introduce himself into Catholic houses. Pere Verdier, in the course of his visitation nearly seven years later, could not get access to the metropolis, but states the general opinion of F. Quin’s invaluable services as a Missionary. I have seen a brief report of his, written when Superior of the Mission, on the condition of the Irish Catholics in 1652 and 1656. Three years later he was at Nantz, whence he removed to St. Malo. He died 7th August, 1663. See also pp. 677-882 of the Hibernia Dominicana.

Reade, Simon, 1672-1731, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2030
  • Person
  • 01 January 1672-01 February 1731

Born: 01 January 1672, Dublin
Entered: 31 July 1696, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1703/4, Poitiers, France
Died: 01 February 1731, Dublin Residence - Romanae Province (ROM)

Studied 2 years Philosophy and 3 Theology, and taught Grammar in Society
1703-1706 Minister and in Theology at Poitiers
1706-1707 Tertianship at Marans
1707-1710 At Residence Saint-Macaire AQUIT teaching Humanities and Prefect of the Church
1711-1715 Spiritual Father at Poitiers
1717 Catalogue Prof 4 Vows. Is now with a noble family in the country giving edification. Is grave and modest, good judgement and a lover of poverty, chastity and obedience. Talent for Mission work and fit to be a Confessor. Assigned to ROM Province
Some of his books printed after 1696 are at Clongowes

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1717 In Ireland, living with some gentleman’s family, and a zealous and solid religious.
Entries in old books show he belonged to the Dublin Residence.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education was at Irish College Poitiers, and he had already commenced Priestly studies there before Ent 30 July 1696 Rome
1698-1701 After First Vows he was sent for a year of Regency to Sezze College, and then, and the instructions of the General, sent for Philosophy to Lyons (LUGD)
1701-1706 Sent to Grand Collège Poitiers (AQUIT) to continue his Theology studies and where he was Ordained 1703/04. During this time he served as Minister at the Irish College.
1706-1707 Made Tertianship at Marennes
1707-1711 Sent teaching Humanities at St Macaire, near Bordeaux. he was also Prefect of the Church at St Macaire.
1711-1715 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Spiritual Father
1715-1725 Sent to Ireland for health reasons and worked in the Dublin area, working from the house of a nobleman in the Dublin area.
1725 Assistant Priest in a Dublin city parish and he died there 01 February 1731

Sall, James, 1579-1646, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2085
  • Person
  • 1579-19 March 1646

Born: 1579, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 26 September 1607, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained:, Douai, France pre Entry
Died: 19 March 1646, Cashel Residence, County Tipperary

Mother was Eliza Kearney.
Educated at Irish College Douai. Studied Humanities and Philosophy at Tournai - 4 years Theology before Ent
1617 In Ireland Age 38 Soc 10
1621 Catalogue Age 42 Soc 14 Mission 12. Is strong though slow in intellect and talent. Judgement and prudence good. Somewhat melancholy. Preaches well.
1622 Catalogue In East Munster
1626 In Ireland
1637 ROM Catalogue Good in all

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1609 Came to the Irish Mission
1617 In Ireland (Irish Ecclesiastical Record August 1874)
1642 He protected Pullen, Protestant Chancellor of Cashel, and his wife and children for three months (cf “Foxes and Firebrands” Ware, p 98, where an extraordinary story is told of Father Sall - disguised as a preaching shoemaker - the Countess of Oxford and Dr Pullen; cf also “Cashel of the Kings, Part ii, p54)
Named in the letter of Christopher Holiwood alias Laundry to the Superior of the Mission 04 November 1611, as being then his amanuensis. (Irish Ecclesiastical Record August 1874)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John, a merchant and Eliza née Kearney and uncle of Andrew Fitzbennet Sall and Andrew Fitzjohn Sall
Had already studied and was Ordained at Douai before Ent 26 September 1607 Tournai
1609 Before First Vows he was sent to Ireland and briefly to the Dublin Residence before being sent to the Cashel Residence. He was for many years a Consultor of the Mission and his advice on the government of the Mission was much valued by the General
1641 He had been appointed Rector of Cashel, and he was able during the rising of 1641 to shield the Protestant Chancellor of Cashel, Dr Pullen, his wife and family from the hardship or worse that awaited them. After three months at the shelter of the Jesuit Residence, the Chancellor and his family were able to get shipping for England. It is to the credit of Dr Pullen that later, when he was then Archbishop of Tuam in his church, he acknowledged the humanity shown towards him by Father Sall. Twenty years later that experience allowed the authorities to tolerate Jesuits in Cashel.
He died at the Cashel Residence 19/03/1646

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
SALL, JAMES, A father of this name had died at Cashell before the year 1649: his aged sister was living in his house, with the two Fathers of the Society, when Pere Verdier visited that City.

Sedgrave, Christopher, 1603-1632, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2103
  • Person
  • 10 January 1603-23 September 1652

Born: 10 January 1603, Cabra, Dublin
Entered: 04 October 1625, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae province (BELG)
Ordained: 1630/1, Douai, France
Final vows: c 1641, Kilkenny Residence
Died: 23 September 1652

Vice-Superior of the Mission March 1652

Parents were John and Joanna Fagan
Studied Humanities at Antwerp and Philosophy at Douai - was an MA and Doctor
1637 ROM Catalogue Good in all things - fit to teach Humanities. Colericus,
1649 At Kilkenny (45 after his name)
1650 CAT DOB 1604 of Dublin; Ent 1627; Came to Mission 1633. Was Procurator of the Mission for several years, Master of Novices 4 years. Is Confessor and Preacher. Prof of 4 Vows
“I think this is the man referred to in the ‘Aphorismical Discovery’ (Gilberts Pt 5 p75) - observe the author’s words on Augustinians

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied two years Philosophy and three Theology. Knew Irish, English, Spanish and Latin
Taught Humanities, was Confessor and Director of the BVM Sodality
1631/1633/1635 Came to Irish Mission; Was Rector of a Residence, Procurator of Mission and Socius to the Master of Novices. Esteemed and good Preacher.
Appointed to report on Stephen White’s works.
At the celebrated meeting of Theologians with Dr Rothe, he said nothing - “nihil dixit” - on the dispute with the Nuncio (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John, of Cabra, and Jane née Fagan
Early classical education was received at Antwerp, and then he went for Priestly studies to Douai, where he graduated MA and D Phil before Ent 04 October 1625 Tournai
1627-1631After his First Vows he was sent for studies to Douai and was Ordained there 1630/31
1631-1646 He was then sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence. He was procurator of the Mission there for many years
1646-1650 Socius to the Novice Master and Procurator of the Novitiate in Kilkenny
1652 When the Mission Superior Robert Nugent was summoned to Europe, he was appointed Vice-Superior of the Mission in March 1652. We are indebted to him for the account of Father Nugent's last days which he wrote at Waterford 16 June 1652.
He seems to have died in Kilkenny in 1652 himself, as his name is not in the 1653 lists

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Christopher Sedgrave (1652)
Christopher Sedgrave, son of John Sedgrave, of Cabra, Co Dublin, and Jane Fagan, was born on or about 10th January, 1603. After studying classics at Antwerp and Douay, and philosophy at Douay, where he gained the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, he entered the Society in the Novitiate of Tournay on 4th October, 1625. When he had completed his theology at Douay in 1631, he returned to Ireland, where he was first engaged in teaching and preaching. He made his solemn profession of four vows about 1641; was Procurator of the Mission for many years, and then Socius of the Master of Novices and Procurator of the Novitiate of Kilkenny for four years (1646-50). When Fr. Robert Nugent was summoned to Europe in March, 1652, Fr Sedgrave was appointed Vice-Superior in his stead, and it is to him we are indebted for the account of Fr Nugent's last days, which he wrote at Waterford on 16th June, 1652. He does not seem to have survived long, but in the confusion of the times the notice of his death has been lost.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Christoper Sedgrave 1603-1652
Christopher Sedgrave, son of John Sedgrave of Cabra County Dublin and Jane Fagan, was born on or about January 10th 1603. After studying classics at Antwerp and Douai, he entered the Society at Tournai in 1625.

He returned to Ireland in 1631 where he was first engaged in teaching and preaching. He was Procurator of Mission for many years, and then Socius to the Master of Novices and Procurator at Kilkenny from 1646-1650.

When Fr Robert Nugent was summoned to Europe in 1652, Fr Sedgrave was appointed Vice-Superior in his stead, and it is to him that we are indebted to for an account of Fr Nugent’s last days, which he wrote in Waterford on June 16th 1652.

Fr Sedgrave does not seem to have survived long after that, but in the confusion of the times, the notice of his death has been lost.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
SEGRAVE, CHRISTOPHER, was one of the Examiners of the MS work of Father Stephen White, “De Sanctis et Antiquitate Hibcrniae” as I find in Father Robert Nugent’s letter, dated Kilkenny, the l0th of January, 1646-7. Two years later, he was the Procurator of the Novitiate at Kilkenny. There Pere Verdier saw this Professed Father, and states that he was about 45 years of age, and “vir optimi judicii”. What became of him later, I have yet to learn.
N.B. A gentleman of the name of Patrick Segrave, had been a special benefactor to the Irish Mission of the Order, as I find in a letter of F. Holiwood, dated 30th June, 1606.

Slingsby, Francis, 1611-1642, Jesuit priest novice

  • IE IJA J/2137
  • Person
  • 14 July 1611-07 December 1642

Born: 14 July 1611, County Cork
Entered: 30 September 1641, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained” 30 June 1641, Rome, Italy - pre Entry
Died: 07 December 1642, Naples, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

Alias Percy

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Slingsby alias Percy
Son of Sir Francis Slingsby (cf Dominic Collins : Captain Slingsby) and Elizabeth née Cuffe (daughter of Hugh Cuffe, of Cuffe Hall, Somerset). Sir Francis’ mother was Lady Mary Percy, the only sister of Thomas and Henry Percy, the seventh and eighth Earls of Northumberland. Thomas led the “Rising of the North” and was executed for treason, and later beatified. Henry, though a Protestant member of the Percy family, also died in the Catholic cause, c 1532. Francis’ father settled in Ireland, and his son, Francis, was born in Cork 1611.
He studied at Oxford and was one of the best mathematicians of his day.
Visiting Rome, he was converted to the Catholic faith at the English College, and entered that College 06/02/1639 as a boarder, to repeat some studies and make Theology. He was Ordained Priest there 30 June 1641. He then entered the Society at St Andrea, Rome three months later 30/09/1641, leaving the English College an example of many virtues.
He was sent then to the Noviciate at Naples for a change of air at the end of his first year noviceship, and he died there soon after, still a novice.
After his conversion, he had returned to Ireland, was arrested and imprisoned at Dublin Castle, and there held the remarkable conference with the Protestant Bishop Ussher, recounted in “Records SJ” Vol V, pp 301 seq (cf also Vol VI, p 348 and Pedigree)
“Esteemed a Saint”; Converted his family; His life is written by Maurice Ward SJ

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Sir Francis and Elizabeth née Cuffe (both English) Brought up and educated in the Protestant faith of his parents.
He studied Humanities in Ireland and later was sent to Oxford University, where he studied Philosophy and Mathematics, showing a special aptitude for the latter.
During a visit to Europe, 1633, he was received into the Church and on his return to Ireland was imprisoned in Dublin for four months but finally released. It was at the insistence of Queen Maria Henrietta, consort of Charles 1, that young Slingsby recovered his liberty, thanks to the efforts behind the scene of Cardinal Barberini and the General of the Society. During his imprisonment, Francis was visited by Protestant Archbishop James Ussher, whose attempts to shake the constancy of the young convert proved unavailing. He was visited also by Robert Nugent, Superior of the Mission, who fervently hoped he would enter the Society.
On his release, Francis expressed his desire to become a priest but gave no indication that he wanted to become a Jesuit. He went to live, however, at the Dublin Residence of the Jesuits, where, with a few other young men, he studied Philosophy under Fr. Henry MacCavell.
Meanwhile, his mother, younger brother and sister followed him into the Catholic Church. As he had now decided to continue his ecclesiastical studies abroad, he made all the necessary legal arrangements for the renunciation of his inheritance in favour of his younger brother.
He entered the English College Rome in February 1639 and was Ordained there 30 June 1641.
The following 30 September 1641 he Entered St Andrea, Rome. At the end of his first year, due to ill health he was sent to Naples to complete his Noviceship, but he died soon after arrival 07 December 1642

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Francis Slingsby 1611-1642
Francis Slingsby was the son of Sir Francis Slingsby, and his wife Elizabeth Cuffe, of Cuffe Hall, Somerset England. His father settled in Ireland and Francis was born in Cork about 1611.

He studied at Oxford and was reputed one of the best mathematicians of his day. While visiting Rome Francis converted and entered the English College there. After his conversion, he returned to Ireland and held a remarkable conference with Bishop Ussher on religious issues. He was ordained in Rome and entered the Society in 1641,

Not being robust in health, he was sent to Naples for a change of air and to make his noviceship. He died soon after at the early age of 31.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
SLINGSBY, FRANCIS, converted at Rome in September, 1633, became a Convictor of the English College at Rome on the 1st of February, 1639 : entered the Novitiate of St. Andrew on the 30th of September, 1641. Died at Naples.

Sutton, Edward, 1726-1754, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2166
  • Person
  • 21 December 1726-30 April 1769

Born: 21 December 1726, County Wexford
Entered: 20 May 1754, Genoa, Italy - Venetiae Province (VEM)
Ordained: Rome - pre entry
Final Vows: 08 August 1764
Died: 30 April 1769, Dublin Residence

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ
DOB 21 December 1726 Wexford; Ent 24 May 1754 Genoa; Ord pre Ent Rome;
Had studied at Irish College Rome and was Ordained there before Ent 24 May 1754 Genoa

1754-1758 After First Vows he was sent to teach Humanities at Bastia College, Corsica
1758-1759 Sent to Rome as Spiritual Father and Prefect of Studies at the Irish College
1759-1763 Sent to the English College as Prefect of Studies
1763 Sent as Penitentiary at St Peter’s 24 March 1763 after which his career cannot be traced beyond 08 August 1764

◆ In Old/17

Talbot, John, 1610-1667, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2172
  • Person
  • 1610-18 November 1667

Born: 1610, Carton, County Kildare
Entered: 1625 - Lusitanae Province (LUS)
Ordained: 1636, Évora, Portugal
Final vows: 06 May 1656
Died: 18 November 1667, Dublin Residence

Foley’s "Collectanea" :
I think there were three John Talbot SJs as follows :
(1) John Talbot DOB 1609; Ent 1626 Portugal;
(2) John Talbot DOB 1611 Kildare; Ent 1632; Irish Mission 1638 Preacher, Confessor and Professor of Humanities; RIP after 1666
(3) John Talbot DOB 1619; Ent c 1637; - had been at St Alban’s Valladolid before Ent Belgium 1637. Not traced in ANG Catalogues
One of these was a brother of Peter, the two others were probably an uncle and cousin of his

1628 Age 18 Soc 3 studying at Coimbra LUS
1634 At Valladolid
1636 At St Anthony’s College Lisbon
1649 CAT Given at Cork (30 after his name)
1650 CAT Teaching, Confessor and Concinator. Came to Mission in 1639 is Age 39.
1666 CAT Consultor of Mission living at Dublin, Catechising and Administering the Sacraments. On the Mission 26 years
“Peter Walsh said when Fr J Talbot died ‘There is one honest Jesuit’”
“Wilson’s Friar Disciplined” p 93 printed in 1694 says Fr J Talbot had influence with General Preston

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of William 1st Baron of Carton and Alison née Netterville. Brother of Richard, first Duke of Tyrconnell by James II and Viceroy of Ireland. Brother of Dr Peter Talbot, formerly SJ and Archbishop of Dublin. Brother of Robert 2nd Baron of Carton. (HIB Catalogues and Dr Peter Talbot’s “Friar Disciplined”) Cousins of the Netterville’s SJ.
Early years in the Society were at Évora, Portugal, and he studied Theology for three years in the Society. He knew Irish, English, French and Latin.
He taught lower schools for three years and was a Preacher and Confessor for eight years. (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI)
1666 Consultor of Irish Mission and living in Dublin. He was engaged in administering the Sacraments and had been on the Mission twenty-six years. (HIB CAT 1666 - ARSI)
Esteemed good Preacher; like most of his Irish contemporaries, he spoke Irish, English and one or more of the continental languages.
Dr Peter Talbot in his “Haersis Blackloiana” says “Évora gave many orthodox Theologians to the Catholic faith, and among others, my brother John Talbot, a distinguished defender of the faith”. (cf Foley’s Collectanea, which also states that the HIB CAT 1650 says that he is a native of Kilkenny, born 1611 and Ent 1629)
Dr Peter Talbot in his “Friar Disciplined” says to the famous Peter Walsh “Mr Walsh, Father John Talbot, of whom you said when he died (as if it were a rarity of kind of miracle) ‘There lies a honest Jesuit’ assured me, that, after his brother Sir Robert Talbot Had...”
Dr Peter Talbot in his “Haeresis Blackloiana” p 250 says that he himself had studied in Rome with such gifted Jesuits (orbis miracula) as Tirrell, Maurus, Telin (an Irishman - Teeling?), and the younger Palavicino, and was appointed to teach Philosophy at Évora, which has given so many outstanding Theologians to England and Ireland, and amongst others, Father John Talbot, my brother, a distinguished defender of the Roman Faith”
He is probably the Jesuit named by Mercure Verdiere, Visitor to the Irish Province, in a letter 24 June 1649, as John James Talbot, then thirty years of age, and residing with his mother, “in oedibus nobilium” (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Sir William of Carton and Alison nee Netterville (daughter of John Netterville of Castletown, Co. Meath) Brother of Peter (later Archbishop of Dublin).
1627-1636 After First Vows (unclear if Noviceship was at Lisbon or Coimbra) he was sent for studies to Coimbra and then Évora where he was Ordained 1636
1636-1640 Had been teaching Latin at St Anthony’s, Lisbon, but very keen to be sent to Ireland.
1640-1652 Sent to Ireland where he worked from his mother’s house. He spoke Irish as well as English
1652-1654 Sent back to Europe and was in the company of his brother Peter (later Archbishop of Dublin), who was visiting various European courts to solicit help for Charles II
1655 Sent back to Ireland and he worked initially near Galway and then Dublin alternately, and ended at the Dublin Residence as a Consultor of the Mission (1664), where he died 18 November 1667

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
TALBOT, JOHN JAMES. This Father is mentioned in Pere Verdier’s Report of the 24th of June, 1649, as being 30 years old, of a robust constitution, but living with his mother, “in oedibus nobitium” without office.

N.B. There was another F. Talbot, whom I meet with in the town of Galway, early in 1649 : he is described as being about 40 years old, Professed of the Four Vows, and then teaching Grammar.

Talbot, Nicholas, 1598-1667, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2174
  • Person
  • 04 May 1599-09 May 1667

Born: 04 May 1599, County Meath
Entered: 30 September 1622, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 22 April 1628, Arras, France
Final vows: 06 July 1629
Died: 09 May 1667, Dublin Residence

Mother was Mary (Margaret) Sedgrave.
Studied Humanities at Lille & Tournai, Philosophy at Douai
1637 Catalogue Good in all. Colericus - fit to teach Humanities
1649 A Talbot at Galway (40 after his name)
1650 Catalogue Came to Mission in 1629. Taught Humanities many years. Prefect of Schools - now Superior of the Residence at Galway Age 52
1666 Catalogue Living in the country near Dublin attending to the wants of the people and some of the gentry. Administering the Sacraments. Is Admonitor and Socius of the Superior. Previously was imprisoned for 3 months. On the Irish Mission 37 years.
John Talbot also died in Dublin 1667

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied Humanities and two years Philosophy before Ent, and the four years Theology in the Society. He knew Irish, English, French and Latin.
1628/9 Came to Ireland
1644 In Galway with Stephen White
1650 Superior of a Residence
1659 Deported having been imprisoned twice
1666 Still working in Ireland and living with a nobleman in the country near Dublin, engaged in ministerial functions.
Professor of Humanities for many years and was a Confessor and Prefect of Studies.
He is named in a letter of Nathaniel Hart (Richard Shelton?) Superior of the Irish Mission, to the General 15 June 1659, as being then past 60, in declining health, unable to travel and unfit for the labours of College life. He was then under bail to leave the country, but sureties were willing that he should remain for the recovery of his health. (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS) - who says “I meet with another Nicholas Talbot, in Galway, early in 1649. he is described as being about 40 years of age, possessed of the four Vows, and then teaching Grammar”. Hogan’s list only contains one Nicholas and the two are probably identical.
(cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of William and Maria née Sedgrave
Had already studied Classics and Philosophy under Jesuits and Lille, Tounai and Douai before Ent 30 September 1622 Tournai
1624-1628 After First Vows he was sent to Douai for Theology and was Ordained 22 April 1628 at Arras
1629 Sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence, where he worked until the Puritan takeover of the city. He left Dublin and for a time was at Kilkea Castles, the former residence of the Countess of Kildare. He eventually went to Galway, where he was teaching at the time of Mercure Verdier’s Visitation of 1648-1649. In his 1649 Report to the General, Verdier reported that Talbot was vehemently in favour of the cessation (and thus opposed to Rinuccini).
After the fall of Galway he continued to work outside the city but was captured, imprisoned (1658) and sentenced to deportation. Because of his precarious health he was respited
1664 He was sent to Dublin as Confessor at the Residence and Socius to the Superior of the Mission, Andrew Fitzbennet Sall. He died there 09 May 1667

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
TALBOT, NICHOLAS. All that I can recover of his history is from a letter of F. Nicholas Hart, addressed on the 15th of June. 1659, to the General Goswin Nickel. It states that F. Nicholas Talbot has not as yet quitted the shores of Ireland : that by reason of his declining strength (for he is past 60) , he appears unequal to the fatigue of travelling, and to the labours of a College life abroad : that his bail, who are answerable to the Government for his departure, are willing that he should remain quietly among his friends and attend to the improvement of his health. F. Hart requests directions how to proceed in this case. N.B. There was another F. Talbot, whom I meet with in the town of Galway, early in 1649 : he is described as being about 40 years old, Professed of the Four Vows, and then teaching Grammar.

Ward, John, 1704-1775, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2229
  • Person
  • 02 February 1704-12 October 1775

Born: 02 February 1704, Dublin
Entered: 28 October 1725, Madrid, Spain - Toletanae Province (TOLE)
Ordained: 1734, Murcia, Spain
Final Vows: 24 February 1742, Clonmel
Died: 12 October 1775, Dublin

Superior of Mission 1760-1773

1768-1770 Superior of Ireland (Arch Ir Coll Rom XIX 97,102)
“Method” (ie of conversing with God) translated by Fr Ward SJ was published again by P Wogan 1799 at Dublin, and an irish version of it in Maynooth (Vol 97) “Mod labartha le Dia, Aistrighe ón Fraincis le PW do choimthinól Iosa”. Clodbualite le P Vhogán a m-Ath Cliatrh 1799. Iar n-a chur Ó Saxbeurla a nGaoildelg le Micheál Ó Longain is an mbliain 1834 (p815 Foley)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1736/8 Sent to Ireland
1752/5 Superior of Dublin Residence and Preacher
1768-1773 Superior of Irish Mission. He received Fr Betagh’s Final Vows. With General Ricci’s permission, he sent a considerable sum of money to relieve the Italian Fathers at the Suppression. Cardinal Marefoschi tried in vain to arrest him and obtain his money, which he had held for Irish ex-Jesuits. (cf Father Bracken’s MS. Hist., and Thorpe’s Letters)
Probably the author of “Method of Conversing with God” Translated from the French by John Ward.
Writer; Superior of Mission; Taught Philosophy in Dublin for two years

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Humanities at the Dublin Jesuit School before Ent 28 October 1725 Madrid
1727-1734 After First Vows he was sent for studies to Murcia where he was Ordained 1734
1734-1738 After a year of Tertianship he taught Philosophy at Palencia
1738 Sent to Ireland and Dublin where he taught at the Jesuit School and gave classes in Philosophy after the death of Canon John Harold
He succeeded Stephen Ussher as Superior of the Dublin Residence and was Consultor of the Mission for many years.
1760 Superior of Irish Mission. It was the time when the enemies of the Society were uniting their forces to procure its extinction. His advice to his companions was “God tries his elect, as gold in the furnace, and in this manner finds them worthy of Himself”. He was the last Superior of the Irish Mission when the Society was suppressed, and was one of the signatories of the acceptance of the Papal Bull of Suppression 07 February 1774.
Like many other Jesuits of the day, they were convinced of the innocence of the Society, and also that it would some day be restored. During the remainder of his life he was trustee of the ex-Jesuit funds which were carefully administered in the hope that they might help the Mission when restored at some future date.
He died at Dublin 12 October 1775

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962

John Ward (1760-1774)

John Ward was born at Dublin on 2nd February, 1704. Having studied humanities at the Society's College of Dublin, he went to Spain, and entered the Novitiate of Madrid on 28th October, 1725. In 1727 he was sent to the College of Murcia, where he made his simple vows as a scholastic on 1st November, 1727, and spent the next eight years of his life at philosophy and theology and his tertianship. He was Professor of Philosophy in the College of Plasencia from 1735 to 1730, when he returned to Ireland. He was stationed in Dublin, and engaged in teaching Latin and philosophy in our college in that city. On 24th February, 1742, he made his solemn profession of four vows in the Jesuit church at Clonmel. He was Superior of the Dublin Residence and Consultor of the Mission for many years. He was appointed Superior of the Mission about the beginning of the year 1760. It was a time when the enemies of the Society were uniting their forces to procure its extinction. Fr Ward's advice to his subjects was: “God tries his elect, as gold in the furnace, and in this manner finds then worthy of Himself”. He was still Superior of the Mission when the blow fell, and he submitted himself to the Papal Brief, and subscribed a document, signed on 7th February, 1774, by the members of the Society in Dublin, accepting the Pope's decision. Conscious of the innocence of the Society, Fr Ward and the other Irish Fathers were convinced that the Society would one day be restored, and in that hope they resolved to save what they could until such time as the Holy See would re-incorporate them. Fr Ward was appointed trustee by his companions, but he did not survive long, for he died at Dublin on 12th October, 1775.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father John Ward 1704-1775
Fr John Ward was the last Superior of the Mission before the Suppression of the Society, ending a line which began with Fr Christopher Holywood, and numbering 32 Superiors, some holding office for a second time.

He was educated at our College in Dublin, where he was born in 1704. His studies were completed in Spain, where he entered the Society at Madrid in 1725.

Returning to Ireland in 1738, he taught Latin and Philosophy in our Dublin school. After being Superior of the Dublin Residence for many years, he was made Superior of the Mission in 1760, a post which he held for fourteen years.

Convinced that the Society would be restored, he, together with the remaining Irish Fathers, resolved to save whatever possessions they had. Fr Ward was appointed Trustee, but he died soon after in Dublin, on October 12th 1775.

To him is attribute the translation of a work in French, entitled “A Method of Conversing with God”.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note : John Ward Mission Superior
Those marked with
were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
WARD, JOHN, born in the County of Dublin, in 1705; at the age of 19, and on the 18th of October, 1724, entered the Society in the Province of Toulouse; was admitted to the solemn Profession of his Order, on the 24th of February, 1742. I find by the catalogue of 1755, that he had been on the Mission then for the last seventeen years, and was Superior of his Brethren in Dublin. Obit 12th of October, 1775.

Watters, Malachy, 1574-1646, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2233
  • Person
  • 27 March 1574-24 October 1646

Born: 27 March 1574, County Meath
Entered: 14 August 1611, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: Douai - pre Entry
Died: 24 October 1646, County Meath

Alias MacConuisce

Mother Jane Alpine
Studied Philosophy 2 years at Douai
1611 BELG Catalogue Mr D Malachy (Mac an Uisce) a priest who in August will have finished Philosophy is not very talented, but comes from Ulster a part of Ireland where the help of our Fathers is much needed. Would be useful in Ireland or Scotland
1615 at St Omer College studying Moral Theology
1621 Catalogue On the Mission 6 years; middling health; talent, judgement and prudence mediocre; has made profession; choleric; Confessor
1622 Catalogue Fitz Valter or Fitzwalter or Walter in Dublin district
1626 Catalogue in Ireland
1637 Catalogue Mediocre in all things

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries : Malachy Young (1); Malcahy Fitzwalter (2)
Malachy Young - DOB 1578 Meath; Ent 1609; RIP 1646-1649
Malcahy Fitzwalter - DOB 1578 Uster; Ent 1611; RIP 1626-1636 Ireland

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Patrick and Joan née Alpine
His early education was in Ireland, and he studied Rhetoric under the Jesuits at Tournai, Antwerp and Lille. He then studied Philosophy under the Jesuits at Douai, and then Theology at the Irish College there and was Ordained before Ent 14 August 1611 Tournai
1613-1617 After First Vows he was sent for studies to St Omer
1615 Early in 1715 Fr Holywood asked the General to have him sent to the Irish Mission, but it would appear that he did not arrive until 1617
1617 Sent to Ireland and mainly to Meath and to the Dublin Residence, and he taught Humanities in the city.
With other Jesuits of Old Irish stock he seems never to have enjoyed the confidence of the Superior and Consultors who easily found fault with Jesuits of old-Irish stock. In the 1630s a determined effort was made to send him back to Belgium, because he had allegedly struck an Anglo-Irish nobleman, but this effort did not succeed. He seems to have still been at the Dublin Residence in 1641 in indifferent health, and after that it is assumed, that following the occupation of Dublin by the Parliamentarians, that he ministered in his native Meath where he died 24 October 1646, not yet having taken Final Vows
1622 Irish College Douai “Aquatici”
1621,1622, 1637 & 1646 HIB Catalogues “Fitzwalter” (1621) and “Walter” (1622) and “Yong” (1637 and “Yonghe” (1646)
His own declaration on Ent at Tournai “Ego Malachias Macanuake Medensis vel aliter Walter Ibernus”

White, John Michael, 1724-1755, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2247
  • Person
  • 01 July 1724-18 February 1755

Born: 01 July 1724, County Meath or Dublin
Entered: 23 March 1746, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: 21 September 1751, Royal College Salamanca, Spain
Died: 18 February 1755, Dublin Residence

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” : :
1750 Was in Dublin

His letters 1740-1753 are at the Irish College Salamanca

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
A Meath family but probably brought up in Dublin as he received his early classical education at the Dublin Jesuit School under Milo O’Byrne and John Ward. He also made some Priestly studies at Santiago and Salamanca before Ent 24 March 1746 Villagarcía

1748-1752 After First Vows he was sent to Royal College Salamanca and was Ordained there 21 September 1751
1752 He was sent to Ireland immediately after Tertianship and sent to a parish in Dunboyne (temporary or permanent is uncertain). he was already in poor health and he died in Dublin Residence 18 February 1755

(A long interesting letter describing his return journey from Spain and his first experiences in Ireland, has survived in the Salamanca papers).