Poitiers

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Poitiers

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Poitiers

80 Name results for Poitiers

23 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Allenou, Sylvain, 1854-1916, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/872
  • Person
  • 02 July 1854-28 July 1916

Born: 02 July 1854, Paimpol, Brittany, France
Entered: 03 March 1876, Angers France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 1888
Final vows: 02 February 1892
Died 28 July 1916, Poitiers, Vienne, France - Franciae Province (FRA)

by 1885 came to Mungret (HIB) for Regency

Austin, John, 1717-1784, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/884
  • Person
  • 12 April 1717-29 September 1784

Born: 12 April 1717, New Street, Dublin
Entered; 27 November 1725, Nancy, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)
Ordained: 22 September 1747, Rheims, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1753
Died: 29 September 1784, Dublin

Cousin of William Doyle - RIP 1785 - Ordained with William X Doyle (his cousin) at Rheims 22 September 1747 by Bishop Joppensi
Grand-uncle of Myles Gaffney - RIP 1861 and John Gaffney - RIP 1898

1740-43 taught Humanities at Rheims
1746 Read Theology at Rheims
1749 taught Humanities at Poitiers and Prefect at Irish College
1750 came to Ireland by July
1770 mentioned in Nano Nagle’s letters
1784 RIP and buried at graveyard of St Kevin’s Protestant Church - monument erected
In French Dictionary of Musicians he is referred to as “le Père Augustin”

A famous Preacher and Teacher and was Prefect at Poitiers.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1746 At Rheims studying Theology
1750 Sent to Dublin
1754 In Ireland and teaching Humanities for five years.
His monument in St Kevin’s calls him :
“Pious. doctus, indeffessus, apostolicus confectus laboribus. Divites admonuit, pauperes sublevavit, juventutum erudivit, orphanis loco parentis fuit, de omni hominum genere praeclare meruit, omnibus omnes factus”.
Topham Bowden, and English Protestant, in his “Tour through Ireland” in 1791 says : Austin was a very remarkable character, of extraordinary learning and piety. he was a great preacher and injured his health by his exertions in the pulpit etc”. (cf Battersby’s “Jesuits” and Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS for the full Latin inscription)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Place of birth in New Street Dublin was then called Austin's Grounds near Kevin Street.
1737 After his Noviceship studied philosophy for two years at Pont-à-Mousson
1739-1744 Spent the next five years in regency at the College of Rheims.
1744-1747 He resumed his studies at Rheims where he was Ordained 22 September 1747.
1747 Sent to complete his theological studies at the Grand Collège, Poitiers . During these studies he lived at the Irish College and held the post of prefect of Discipline. It is likely that he made his tertianship at Marchiennes before he returned to Ireland in 1750.
1750-1784 Spent all of his Missionary life in Ireland at Dublin. He did many ministries, but is best remembered as a devoted teacher. He died on 29 September, 1784, and is buried at St. Kevin's churchyard, Camden Row, Dublin.

The inscription on his monument aptly sums up his ministry of thirty-four years in the city: “Pius, devotus, indefessus, apostolicis confectus laboribus. Divites admonuit, pauperes sublevavit, iuventutem erudivit, orphanis loco parentis fuit, de omni hominum genere meruit, omnibus omnia factus.”

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Note from the Myles and John Gaffney Entries :
Their Grand-uncle was the celebrated John Austin, a remarkable Jesuit in Dublin towards the middle of the eighteenth Century.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Austin, John
by C. J. Woods

Austin, John (1717–84), Jesuit priest, was born off Kevin Street, Dublin, on 12 April 1717. He showed promise as a youth, and was said to have come to the attention of Jonathan Swift (qv). He went to France and joined the Society of Jesus in the Champagne (27 November 1735). After a period of teaching the humanities and as prefect of the Irish college in Poitiers, he returned to Dublin (1750) and took his final vows (2 February 1754). Austin soon acquired a reputation there as a powerful preacher and as a friend of the poor. After the society was dissolved by the pope (1773), he was one of twelve Jesuits who wrote from Ireland accepting their new status as secular priests. Three years later he and the other fourteen former Jesuits then in Ireland formed a voluntary association to hold their resources in common, thus anticipating the revival of the society after 1800 and enabling it in 1814 to open its famous school at Clongowes Wood, Co. Kildare.

Austin is best remembered as founder (1760) of a classical school, in Saul's Court, off Fishamble Street, Dublin, which was so well thought of that it was used as the diocesan school for Meath as well as Dublin for preparing priests prior to their going to a seminary on the Continent. His pupils there included Daniel Murray (qv) the future archbishop of Dublin and Michael Blake (qv) who was to reopen the Irish college in Rome in 1824. John Austin died in Dublin on 29 September 1784 having acquired an exceptional reputation for ministering to the poor. He was buried in St Kevin's churchyard and a pyramidal stone erected over his grave. His portrait, by James Petrie (qv), was engraved by Henry Brocas (qv) and published by Bartholomew Corcoran (1792).

George Oliver, Collections towards illustrating . . . Scotch, English and Irish members, Society of Jesus (1835), 214; W. J. Battersby, The Jesuits in Dublin (1854), 94–100; Timothy Corcoran, The Clongowes Record, 1814 to 1932 (1932), 35–6, 39–41; M. J. Curran (ed.), ‘Archbishop Carpenter's epistolae, 1770–1780’, Reportorium Novum, i (1955), 164; Louis McRedmond, To the greater glory: a history of the Irish Jesuits (1991), 108–9

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1I 1962

FATHER JOHN AUSTIN SJ 1717-1784
We have a great deal of information about eighteenth-century Dublin, much of it trivial or stupid, practically all of it unconnected with the lives of the great mass of the people. In particular, we know almost nothing of the lives of the Irish Jesuits who worked in the Dublin slums. One of the most distinguished was John Austin, who was born in Dublin in 1717. There is a story told about him by Battersby, on what authority I do not know. About 1732 the boy was attending a school near the Deanery where Swift lived. The Dean, after seeing some verses the boy had written in defence of an old but faithful dog, sent for the parents, who said “they wished him to become a priest”. Swift recommended the parents to “send him to the Jesuits, who would make a man of him”.

John Austin entered the Jesuit novitiate at Nancy on 27 November, 1735. He made his vows on 28 November, 1737. He studied logic and physics at Pont-à-Mousson 1737-39. He then went to Rheims, where he was teaching 1739-44, repeated philosophy 1744-45, and studied theology 1745-17. He was ordained 22 September 1747. He studied theology for two more years in the Irish College, Poitiers. After which he presumably made his tertianship. He returned to Dublin in 1750, where he remained until his death: 29 September, 1784.

Of this thirty-four years' ministry in Dublin we know practically nothing. I have been able to find only two contemporary references. The dramatist, John O'Keeffe, who was born in 1747, says: “From the Greek, Latin and French acquired under Father Austin, to whose school in Cook Street I went, my fancy soon strayed to Shakespeare”. An English traveller, after seeing the monument over Father Austin's grave in St. Kevin's graveyard, wrote as follows:

I was surprised such a monument should be erected in this country to a Romish Priest, and was led to enquiries relative to Austin, I was informed he was a very remarkable character in this metropolis about twelve or fourteen years ago, of extraordinary learning and extraordinary piety; that he constantly dedicated all his acquisitions, which were very considerable, to the poor, visiting them in cellars and in garrets; never a day happy that he did not give food to numbers. The principal Catholics, knowing well his disposition, were liberal to him, and he kept his door open to all who were in want; and while the means lasted, was constantly on foot, administering relief to innumerable poor wretches, never resting while he had a single guinea. Besides this, he was a great preacher, and injured his health by his exertions in the pulpit. He was a most affectionate son to an aged mother, she died, and he was overpowered with affliction, he never afterwards raised his head, but dropped into a second state of childhood. He remained in this situation near three years, and would have perished were it not for his brother Jesuits, Messrs, Betagh, Fullam and Mucaile. When he died, his friends who neglected him on the bed of death, erected this monument to his memory.

Gilbert, in his History or the City of Dublin, says:

A portrait of Father Austin, engraved by Brocas, was published by B Corcoran, dedicated to the Roman Catholics of Dublin, and inscribed: “To you the poor were left and you became the guardian of the orphan”. A large house at the end of Archbold's Court in Cook Street was traditionally pointed out as having been occupied by Father Austin, after whose death the court became the residence of Father Magaulay, an excommunicated Catholic priest, by whom nearly all the clandestine marriages in the city were performed and who was commemorated in various popular ballads.

And that is all we know, he worked for thirty-four years in a back street of Dublin, ministering to the poor downtrodden - Catholics of his native city. The fruits of his educational work, in encouraging future priests: and! in forming lay leaders, must have been immense. One of his pupils, afterwards his fellow-worker, was the famous Thomas Betagh, who entered the Society in 1754, and died as Parish Priest of SS Michael and John in 1811.

In the Presentation Convent, George's. Hill, Dublín there have been preserved four letters of Father. Austin, which I have transcribed. As historical documents they are of no particular value. But they have their own interest as a precious memento of this zealous Dublin priest to whom we in these latter days of ease owe so much. In some ways - perhaps in their touch of prim “preachinessi” - they are not very different from the letters which a fervent Jesuit Scholastic might write today. But we see the writer's interest in Catholic education which was later to be his life-work, we can glimpse the life of Catholic Dublin which went on unobtrusively under the shadow of the Castle in spite of persecution. There are passing references to Rev Fr Austin - a well-known Dublin priest - Cousin Will, John Fullam, Peter Bullrill, Peter Cashel and various relatives, whose names, unrecorded in human annals, are written in the Book of Life. These simple letters, redolent of the piety and difficulties of our forejathers, deserve to find a place in an Irish Jesuit periodical :

LETTER I
Pont-à-Mousson, 29 December 1737

Dear and Honoured Parents,

I don't know whether my twelvemonth's silence has been disagreeable to you or not. However it be, I should not have failed to have writ once more this year past, were it not that I expected to hear from you beforehand. But as I waited in vain all the summer and no letter appearing I thought it as good to put off my writing till after my vows; which I have had the happiness to make the 28th of November here in the University of Pont-à-Mousson, where I am to reside in the study of Philosophy for two years, during one of which I shall have the pleasure of enjoying my dear cousin Will's - company for he has been here already one year, but I have not come hither from the Noviceship till the beginning of October last. We have (enjoyed) and do as yet by the grace of God enjoy both a perfect state of health and whether we are together or separated, we find nothing everywhere, both one and the other, but content and happiness. He desires earnestly to tender you his kind love and service.

A little after my arrival here he writ home, for we thought it best to write separately, to the end that if one letter should miscarry, the other might perhaps speed better. I send you this by the post; for though I sent last year's letter - according as I conceived Rev Mr Austin's directions - under cover to Mr. King at Paris, yet as I have received none since from you and consequently am not sure whether you have received mine or not. I have reason to doubt whether that I have not rightly understood the manner of directing which has been marked (for) me, or that it is not very sure, I beg you would be pleased to give my most humble respects to the Rev Mr. Austin, to whose bounty and kindness. I am so gratefully bound. If that manner of directing be sure, I would be glad to know in your first whether I might continue, it at least once a year. I have writ also to cousin Peter Cashel. He will be so kind as to direct yours to me, for I have given him the superscription which might serve whilst I am here, in case you can send by hand anywhere into France.

I should rejoice and give God Thanks to hear that you are in good health and peace of mind; ‘tis, I assure you, the continual object of my poor prayers. But your soul's welfare affects me yet more. Praise be to God I have no great subject of apprehension of that side on your part. I lay He be graciously pleased to augment more and more the care you have for your eternal salvation. It can't be sufficiently deplored how much people forget that only great necessary affair, which ought to be sovereignly preferred to a parcel of frivolous wordly beings that pass and perish every day before our eyes and the which they are sure to enjoy at most, for a short term of years. Pardon a son's boldness who would fain inspire a true sentiment of the necessity of seeking by all means possible. to assure a doubtful eternity - terrible doubt which makes tremble so many persons who live a retired and perhaps innocent life, and which of greater reason ought to imprint a salutary fear in those who are exposed to so many dangers in the world.

'Tis for young persons especially that all is to be feared, and for whom by consequence the most care is to be taken to inspire them . betimes with a great fear of God, a great hatred of vice, and an early love of piety. Redouble, I pray you, your pious industry in that point towards them young children, my dear little brothers and sister. I pray you to embrace them on my part, especially little Dicky - I suppose he begins to read at present. You are to be praised never to let your children want learning according to your means; for no one knows to what God might call him, and though you have too much piety to hinder a child's vocation, yet if he takes even to the world, learning is no burthen. Above all things care is to be taken to preserve his innocence and hinder his. manners from being corrupted; and it is not to be conceived how much one and the other is in danger even already in the very infancy of children, who have too much liberty and who take every ill impression like to wax, The best means you can take is to pray dails for their preservation from sin. Perhaps I make too much the preacher, but I assure you I am so touched with dangers to which I see exposed so many persons whom I love sincerely, that I can't forbear to speak iny mind thereupon. And I would to God that my weak words could prevail upon them who are very near to me and whom I have reason to apprehend stand in need of making such solid reflections for the welfare of their souls. A very pious practice in a family would be the frequent lecture of books of piety; the Introduction to a Devout Life (of S.Francis de Sales) is onė very proper and useful for that end.

I would be glad to hear how it is with my Uncle Simon's family. My love and service to them and all my uncles and aunts, friends and relations, particularly to dear Mrs Doyle and her good family; not forgetting cousin M Dod, to whose prayers I desire to be recommended. My thanks and kind service to all friends who shall be so kind as to inquire after me.

I would seem that I doubted of your prudence if I should caution you not to let inquisitive people know to what design I am away or what I am. You know already what dangerous consequences might hereafter ensue, even where you might apprehend the least. I would not be amiss even if those who know it already were advised to let it drop in silence.

My love to cousin C Maginnis and her family, and recommend to her great care of my little god-daughter. You might please to mark me how that child is. You would do well also to cast a charitable eye sometimes to see how it is with my other little one of Mr Balf's. Be pleased not to fail to let me know the good health of R Mr Austin. I shall expect yours as soon as possible. Don't forget me in your good prayers and those of other good friends. I shan't fail on my poor part, always remaining with God's will and pleasure, dear Father and Mother, your most affectionate .. and dutiful son,
John Austin

Be pleased not to forget my respects to Mr Milon and the other gentlemen

LETTER II
Pont-à-Mousson, September 9th 1738

Dear and Honoured Parents,

I suppose Cousin Will's letter is already received, for he has writ home about a week ago. If that be, I have no need to repeat to you that the Divine will which has joined us so happily is pleased at present to separate us for a while: he being destined to the in Picardy where he goes to teach, and myself remaining here as yet a year in order to finish my course of Philosophy. He parted this morning. Myself and some others accompanied him a small league out of town, where we quitted each other very cheerfully, considering that in our state we should rejoice rather than repine in accomplishing God's will and pleasure in what He ordains us for His greater glory.

Just as he was going off, your last letter arrived, so that we were already out of the town when it was sent after us. We have also received all the letters which you have made mention of this year. For since my last of April, two or three came into our hands; some of which had delayed somewhat on the road, as appeared by the date - one from Cousin Doyle was dated even of March, 1737. Don't think, dear Parents, that these letters are of any charge to us. Foe in that point as well as the rest that concerns the temporal, such is the bounty of the heavenly providence for us (that) all is paid and prepared to our hands without any care or other application on our part, besides that of our studies or exercises which may serve to our own proper sanctification and thereby put us in (the) state of procuring that or others.

But my so good fortune, far from being a matter of boasting, should rather give me a subject of humbling myself to think that in quitting the world I find myself in better circumstances than I could naturally promise me in embracing it.

I am really charmed and do heartily thank God for the pious sentiments which He has inspired you touching the education of your dear children, as well as by your personal example as by your wholesome instructions. A very important article, and which many parents neglect very often to their future sorrow, is to render the children supple and obedient to the smallest sign of their parents' good pleasure in whatsoever they bid them: so that as soon as ever they begin to have the usage of their self-will, they should be taught to renounce to it; since it is the only root of all sin and were there no self-will there would be no hell. However, it is rather by mildness than rashness that a child's stubborn humour should be thwarted, in ordering calmly but at the same time seriously and inflexibly even the smallest things - were it but to kiss the ground, to quit or take somewhat against his inclinations, or the like.

As I might seem too bold in suchlike discourse as well now as at other times, you may be pleased to consider that, a principal point of our vocation being the pious education of the youth as well as their instruction in sciences, we are wont to make there upon nore frequent and deep reflections than ordinary. And besides I can learn somewhat by the manner wherewith the children of the best families are elevated (=educated) here, where their parents send them in pension very young that they may be reared up more safely in the piety. To all which if you add that my first and chiefest zeal should be for those whom I am obliged before God to hold most dear, you will rather approve than blame this liberty which a sincere and ardent desire. of eternal welfare inspires me.

Then dear little Dicky can read - which perhaps he can already - without doubt you will make him every evening read a little in some devout book before you. If he be accustomed betimes, he'll do it hereafter of himself. There is nothing more capable to imprint the fear and love of God in the minds of old and young than pious lectures well reflected upon and meditated in the presence of God - such as you night see in the Introduction of St Francis Sales.

I am very sensible to the kindness of all my good friends and particularly of them gentlemen who did me the honour to remember me in your last (letter). I beg you will be pleased to give to them, every one in particular, my most humble respects and service as well as to all my relations: Uncle Christy, Uncle Richard, Uncle Robin, theirs and Uncle Simon's spouses and families; Cousins Mortimer, Magguinis, Savour, and their families, etc. My kind love and service to Mr and Mrs Fullam. I have lately heard from dear friend Johnny, and answered. I have writ to Mrs Doyle by Cousin Will's last, as we have both by the same to Cousin Molly Dodd.

We enjoy always, blessed be God, perfect health and contentment. Pray take great care of yours. I am, dear Father and Mother, your most respectful and affectionate son,
Jn. Austin.

P.S. - You'll please to direct henceforth: a Monsieur Austin demeurant au College, Pont-à-Mousson en Lorraine. I expect to write soon to Cousin Peter. Be pleased to give the following lines with my respects to Mr Austin.

LETTER III
Rheims, 7th October 1742

Most Dear and Honoured Mother,

I received with pleasure your last letter dated the 4th June, and have been obliged to wait ever since for an hour's leisure to write to you. But now that our yearly vacations begin, you may be sure that my first thoughts are to satisfy you. I sent immediately on the reception of your letter that inscribed to Cousin Will, with whom I have correspondence as frequent as we both please, His answer came shortly after; and as far as I can judge, Cousin Doyle need be no way alarmed as she seems to be at the light ailment of Cousin Will.

“Tis a kind of headache which at most hinders sometimes his application to certain studies, but the which neither interrupts his other occupations nor hinders his being as day and jovial as any other. Pray give my kind love and service to his dear mother and family, to whom I wish you may always acknowledge to your utmost power the obligations which bind me eternally to them. You will please to inform them likewise that Cousin Will goes this next year to dwell at Sens, a town of the Champagne, where he is to continue the same career which he has begun at Laôn and which I am to continue here next year also. They must not be Surprised at these changements of dwelling, for nothing is more common in our state which engages us to go to and fro wherever God's will and His glory calls us.

For my part, blessed be the Lord, I have enjoyed hitherto and enjoy still in these parts good health and contentment. When it shall please Him to treat me otherwise, I hope He will give me patience; but hitherto He has favoured my weakness. After a month's rest and recreation in town and at our country house, our usual application begins. Aid me with your prayers, wherein I have very much confidence; a good mother's prayers and blessing are ordinarily efficacious, and I am persuaded that I owe a great deal thereto.

Don't fail especially to pray every day for my little brothers and to offer them to God Almighty, that He may take them under His protection for what concerns their body and soul. Without His aid all the pains you'll take for their education will be employed in vain. But if God blesses then and gives then His love and fear in their hearts, all will surely prosper with them in the time and in the eternity. Tis what I ask Him each day for them and you. Pray never fail in your letters to inform me of their progress in learning and especially of their piety towards God and docility towards you. For what you have already told thereof has given me a great deal of pleasure and consolation.

I shall dwell here this next year with an Englishman of our family, who comes hither from Liège in Flanders for to study in Divinity. We shall prattle together in our tongue, and that will - serve to recall my English, For I have scarce as yet found time to read over two or three English books I brought hither. And though I have found here enough of English acquaintance, yet do I meet them but very rarely, and even then do they speak French, being partly habiting in this town for to learn that language.

For Johnny Fullam, I don't know whether he remains at Lyons next year or no.. He told me about April last that he expected to go to Poitiers, and that Mr Heneys had gave him so to understand. But as I writ since for to demand the confirmation thereof, and his next answer not having said a word upon that head, I am yet in doubt: thereupon. Pray give my kind service to his parents, and assure them that he was in good health about two months ago when he writ last to me.

We have in these parts this year plenty of corn, wine, etc. But we have this time past so wet and cold windy weather that the vintage, which is commonly finished before this time, is not as yet begun hereabouts, where we are just hard by the fine wines of Champagne and Montagne, For the wars, though we be nigher to them than you, yet I believe, you know as much in them parts by the newspapers as we do here.

My humble respects to Messrs Milan, Sweetman and to the other gentlemen as the occasion presents itself. My kind love and service to all my uncles, aunts, cousins and their families in general and in particular when you see them. My love to my dear little brothers, and charge then in my name to apply themselves heartily to their learning, and especially take great care that they know perfectly their Catechism and what concerns their religion and the fear and love of their Maker, and that it were better to die a thousand times than to offend Him.

I would willingly know what are become my uncle Simon's children, etc., as also if you could inform me - when you shall please to write - where is young Johnny Murphy and whether Laurence Walsh is as yet at Paris or no, or what youths you know of my acquaintance are, come overseas; whether you have had news from Cousin Mortimer or not.

Cousin Peter Bullfill has been partly cause that you have my letter so late. Tis above a fortnight ago since I write to him, and I began this letter immediately after. But as I had promised him in my letter to keep this till I could have news from him (which I have not had since a very long time), I have been obliged to tarry till now, whereas I might have had his answer in four or five days. But indeed he is to be excused, for, as he tells me, he has been sick these several months past and is as yet actually very weak and feeble the which has really appeared in his very short though very friendly letter. Be assured, dear Mother, that I am always, with the utmost respect, your most affectionate son,
John Austin

LETTER IV
Rheims, 22nd October 1743

(On Back.) To Mr Francis Fullam, dwelling in Bridge Street, to be furthered to Mrs Austin, Dublin, Ireland,

(At the top of the first page;) The enclosed is for Mr Milan . You'll please to send me his letter enclosed in yours, if he pleases to send me one. Or tell him my address if he desires to know it: à la Mr Jaquinet, Marchand Fabricant dans la rue Barbatre, pour faire tenir a Mr Austin a Reims en Champagne.

Most Dear and Honoured Mother,

I wrote to you a little before Easter, I suppose you have not writ since, for I have received no letter from you since that wherein you gave me account of my Uncle John's strange discovery. I remain here as yet for next year, and never enjoyed better health than I do at present, Pray let me know if yourself and all your family go well. Also especially I pray you to give me an exact account of my brothers' behaviour towards you, and for their other duties above all in what concerns the piety. Do they pray God heartily and exactly? Dicky should now be capable of reading my letters, and of writing to me even upon necessity. He must send me in your next, if you please, a little sketch of (=by) his hand. If he be not fit for learning Latin, he must read, write and cypher as well as possible he can learn. Let him never fail to read each day some time in a good pious book. When he can do it before you in the evening, twere the best, Make him learn the Catechism to his little brothers, which they must all know perfectly well before all things and as soon as they are capable of learning anything whatsoever. This point is very important, and parents in them parts seem not to know enough their great and strict obligations to have their children instructed principally in what concerns their religion. All the rest without that is not worth while, and yet commonly 'tis what's the most neglected.

If your children fear God, they will be also your consolation, Would to God there were means of giving to children in them poor countries the same Christian education which they receive in these parts. My heart bleeds to see and think upon the difference, without being able to amend it. We see here of how much piety and virtue youth are capable, and how much it depends on those who rear them (so as) to render them such, in keeping them from evil example, bad company and occasions, and in giving them early principles of piety, of good and Christian manners. Parents work and slave day and night for to get bread for their children and to establish them well in the world. Tis very well done. But if they are good Christians well instructed in the faith of an everlasting life (and) an eternal establishment, they should take a thousand times more pains for to procure to their children this latter establishment, and that their souls may be better provided for than their bodies. Many notwithstanding, who pass for very honest Christians in all the rest, are often very bad parents on this head, and have thereupon the most terrible accompts to render at God's tribunal. I could wish with all my heart that many persons who are dear to me were well convinced and frightened with this consideration; they would have reason to tremble thereupon but yet more to act in consequence thereon. Sometimes a letter as this or any other, read to a neighbour or relation seemingly without design, might make them take reflections on such a matter which is so important for the salvation of parents and which damns so many.

Cousin Doyle and. John Fullam are both in good health: the first at Sens and the second at Lyons, there they remain next year, They both salute your kindly. Give my kind love and service to both their families, and testify newly my acknowledgments to Mr Fullam's parents on their receiving always my letters, My love and service particularly to my Uncles Richard and Christy and families; Uncle Robin Walsh and family; Cousins Savour and Maginnis and families, And if anything worth while is arrived in those families, I pray let me know it. My love and service to Aunt Bridget and her family. And let me know if you have tidings of my Uncle Simon or not. My Aunt, does she still dwell with you? Are you in good intelligence together? Nothing more easy nor more natural for two sisters and widows.

All things have been abundant this year in these parts, Has it been so in Ireland and with your little spot thereof in particular? You see I am grown very curious. But nothing which concerns you or yours can be indifferent to me. I know not how I lost again my brothers ages; the pain won't be so great to send me then once more, and I’ll be more careful if I can. Embrace them all three for me and assure then that I pray for them and you every day of my life. If they and you remember me often in praying God, I shall prefer that remembrance to all the other tokens of tenderness ye can give me, All that is not good for the soul passes with the body and avails nought.

For you especially, dear mother, be assured that I have very much confidence in your good prayers. We must one and t'other also be constantly mindful to pray for my dear Father's soul. That piety will be better placed and more useful than a silly grief which serves for nothing, neither to the living nor the dead. Your young ones have especially more need of your prayers than you think. Ofter then each day to God that he may keep them in His love and service in the world or take them betimes out of the world. If you love them truly, that must be your constant wish. Wish me the same, I pray you, and believe me to be always with the greatest affection and respect, dear mother, your most loving and submissive son,
John Austin. Reims, the 22nd October, 1743.

Don't forget, I pray you, when occasion offers to tender my best respects to Mr Milan, and send me tidings of his health. What is become of Cousin Molly Dodd? And Mr Keary, lives he as yet? If Mr Atkins asks after me, give him my humble service.

Professor Alfred O’Rahilly

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father John Austin 1717-1784
Fr John Austin was born in New Street – then called Austin’s grounds – near Kevin Street Dublin on April 12th 1717. We are told that young Austin, who attended the school near St Patrick’s, one day rattled off impromptu verses to prevent some youngsters butchering a dog. Dean Swift heard about this, sent for the boy’s parents, and asked them what they intended for the boy. “The priesthood” answered his parents. Swift then told them to send him to the Jesuits, who would make a man of him. It is thought that the Dean paid for his education.

John became a Jesuit in 1735, returning to Dublin in 1750. He acted as curate to Fr John Murphy, PP of St Michael and John’s. Together with his PP Fr Austin opened a school, in spite of the law, in Saul’s Court in 1760. For several years this was the only and for 50 years the principal school for Catholics in Dublin, as well as being the nearest approach to a Diocesan Seminary.

On the Suppression of the Society, Fr Austin became one of the Trustees of the Province Funds.

He died on September 29th 1784, and was buried at St Kevin’s Churchyard. Two years later an obelisk was erected over his grave by the grateful citizens of Dublin. The following is his epitaph :
“To the Memory of Rev Father John Austin of the City of Dublin, priest and until the Suppression of the Society of Jesus a professed Jesuit. During six and thirty years a pious, learned and indefatigable labourer in the vineyard of the Lord, who after deserving well of the rich whom he admonished, of the poor whom he relieved, of the youth whom he instructed, of the orphan to who he was a father, of all ranks of men, whome he by making himself all in all, was active in gaining to Jesus Christ, on the 29th September 1784, closed, in the 66 year of his age, a life worn out in the sight of the Lord. Religion, weeping for her faithful Minister, on the 8th December 1786 with grateful hand erected this Monument”.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
AUSTIN, JOHN, was born in Dublin on the 12th of April, 1717, and joined the Order in Champaigne, on the 27th of November, 1735. After completing the high er Studies, he was employed in teaching Humanities for several years. In 1750, he reached his native city, and obtained a reputation for talents in the pulpit. On the 2nd of February, 1754, he was admitted to his religious Profession.
This good Father, dying on Michaelmas day, 1784, was buried in St. Kevins Church-yard, Dublin. A plain stone monument, of pyramidal form, stands over his grave ; and the following inscription is read on the West and South Panels of the Pedestal. On the opposite sides there is the English translation:
Viro Reverendo
Johanni Austin
Dubliniensi
Societatis Jesu, dum fuit, Sacerdoti
In Vinea Domini per annos 36,
Pio, Docto, Indefesso Operario,
Qui
III Calendas Octobris, A. D. 1784
Aetatis anno sexto et sexagesimo
Vitam
Apostolicis, confectam laboribus
Cum morte In conspectu Domini pretiosa
Commutavit

Cippum Hunc
Ministri fidelis Rcligio non immemor
VI Idus Decembris, A. D. 1786
Flens Possuit.
Divites admonuit
Pauperes sublevavit
Juventutem erudivit
Orphanis loco Parentis fuit
De omni Hominum genere
Praeclare meruit
Omnibus oninia factus
Ut
Omnes Christo lucrifaceret.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

Bermingham , Nicholas, 1721-1758, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/919
  • Person
  • 26 November 1721-30 June 1758

Born: 26 November 1721, County Galway
Entered: 28 September 1740, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1750/1
Final Vows: 02 February 1756
Died: 30 June 1758, Galway Residence

Alias D’Arcy

First Vows 22 November 1742
1741-1750 At Fontenoy College (AQUIT) - taught Grammar, Humanities and Rhetoric. Studied Theology
1749 at Bordeaux teaching Grammar and Rhetoric
1755-1758 in Ireland where he died

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Taught Humanities and Rhetoric for six years
1752-1755 In Galway
Battersby says he died 30 June 1758 by 1758 is added with a cross before it in HIB Catalogue

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had completed two years Philosophy before Entry 28 September 1740 Bordeaux
1742 After noviceship he completed Philosophy and spent four years Regency at Fontenoy before Theology. Ordained 1750/1
1752 Returned to Ireland and assigned to Galway Residence. He remained there on missionary work until his death 30 June, 1758

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BIRMINGHAM, NICHOLAS. He sometimes passed by the name of Darcy. He was born on the 26th of November, 1721, and entered the Order at Bordeaux, at the age of 19. After finishing his studies and teaching Humanities for six years, he was sent to the Mission, and in that capacity was employed in Galway. But his course was short: for eight years later viz, on the 30th of June, 1758, he was called to receive the reward of his labours.

Brennan, Thomas, 1709-1773, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/953
  • Person
  • 02 January 1709-09 November 1773

Born: 02 January 1709, Dublin
Entered: 02 January 1726, San Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1740
Final Vows: 02 February 1743
Died: 09 November 1773, College of Immaculate Conception, Derbyshire, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Son of Dr Peter Brennan, founder of the Meath Hospital;
1740 came home to Ireland with a case of relics!
1743 Professor of Theology a the Grand College Poitiers
1743 to 1753 distinguished preacher in Dublin
1754 Rector Irish College, Rome to 1754 and again 25 February 1758 succeeding Fr Michael Fitzgerald (or was Rector from 01 May 1757 to 1759)
1758-1762 Operarius at Seminary in Poitiers, then 1762 Minister and Procurator at Irish College in Poitiers
1763 Prof of Theology at the Grand College Poitiers
1768 On the mission at Barborrough, near Chesterfield, England (poss Barlborough?)
1769 Rector of College of Immaculate Conception Derbyshire, England

◆ Fr John MacErlean SJ :
1740 Sent to Ireland (in pen)
1744-1754 Distinguished Preacher in Dublin
1754 Rector of Irish College Rome
1763 At Poitiers and Professed Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers
1769 Rector of College of Immaculate Conception, Derbyshire
(cf Arrêt de la Cour du Parliament de Paris)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
DOB 02 January 1709 Dublin; Ent 01 January 1726 Rome; Ord 1740 Rome; RIP c 1773 Derbyshire

Son of Daniel and Mary Anne née O'Sullivan
1729-1732 After First Vows he was sent for one year of Rhetoric and then he studied Philosophy at the Roman College.
Regency was spent at Montepulciano, Orvieto and Loreto
1737 Returned to Rome for Theology and was ordained in 1740
1740-1744 At Montepulciano again for one year teaching and then three years at Teramo
1744 Sent to Ireland and spent 10 years as assistant Priest at St Mary’s Lane Chapel Dublin
1754-1759 Appointed Rector of Irish College Rome
1759 Appointed Procurator for the Society in France until the dissolution of the Society in France
Then joined ANG and was on the Mission in Derbyshire when died a few months after the Suppression in November 1773

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BRENNAN, THOMAS, of Dublin, was born on the 20th of December, and entered the Roman Province of the Society on the 1st of January, 1725. Returning to Ireland after completing his studies, and being admitted to the Profession of the Four Vows, he was employed in one of the Parishes of Dublin, for nearly ten years, and gained distinction as a Preacher. He was called to Rome in 1754, to govern the Irish Seminary in that City. At the expiration of his Superiority, he became aggregated to the English Province, was appointed to a Mission in Derbyshire, and was declared Rector of his Brethren, in the College of the Immaculate Conception of Our Lady, on the 6th of June, 1769. He died in Derbyshire, shortly after the Suppression of his Order ; but the exact date I cannot procure.

Brown, Ignatius, 1630-1679, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/959
  • Person
  • 01 November 1630-30 December 1679

Born: 01 November 1630, County Waterford
Entered: 27 June 1651, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: 1657/8, Valladolid, Spain
Final Vows: 15 August 1668
Died: 30 December 1679, Valladolid, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)

Ignatius Brown 1st
Uncle of Ignatius Browne - RIP 1707

1655 1st or 2nd year Theology at Valladolid- College of St Ambrose.
1660 Reading Philosophy at Valladolid
1663-1673 In Ireland - Preacher and Catechist
1675 On business of Irish Mission in France
1678 Back to Ireland
Founded the College at Poitiers

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1663-1673 Sent from Compostella to Ireland. Reputed to be a learned, eloquent, zealous and edifying Preacher in Cork, Drogheda and other towns (Primate Plunket)
1666 At Waterford Preaching, Catechising and administering the Sacraments, and had been a Missioner for three years. (HIB Catalogue BREV - ARSI)
1673 Forced to leave Ireland in the Summer for health reasons and went to England. In November he went to Paris, and by his industry and the influence and generosity of great friends - including Queen Catherine of England - he procured letters patent for the erection of the Irish house of studies at Poitiers, and was declared its first Rector.
1679 He was appointed Confessor to the Queen of Spain, but died later that year at Valladolid on his way to Madrid. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
Founded the Irish College Poitiers; Writer
In his condemnation of Serjeant’s book he signs himself “Professor of Theology" (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
For his writings cf de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”. A controversial manuscript of his exists at Stonyhurst
Note from No Ch Name (actually George) Murphy :
Named in an Italian letter, dated Dubin 22 November 1672, and written by the Martyr, the Archbishop Oliver Plunket, Primate of Ireland, to Father General Oliva, in which, after expressing his affectionate regard for the Society, and informing him of the meritorious labours of Fathers Rice and Ignatius Brown at Drogheda, he speaks of Father Murphy as a good Theologian, and excellent religious man, a man of great talent, and a distinguished preacher in the Irish language. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Philosophy before Ent 27 June 1651 Villagarcía
1653 After First Vows he was sent to Valladolid for Theology where he was Ordained 1657/1658
1658 Appointed to Chair of Philosophy at Valladolid
1663-1671 Sent to Ireland and was appointed to Waterford for the next eight years, frequently preaching in various parts of Munster.
1668-1671 Arrested in Autumn 1668 and sentenced to imprisonment, but through the influence of a nobleman was released.
1671-1673 Sent to Drogheda
1673 Appointed Superior of Dublin Residence but did not assume office. He was now in poor health and received permission from the General to retire to one of the European Provinces. He was then able to take an active part in the negotiations for the foundation of the Irish College of Poitiers of which he became the first Rector.
During his Rectorship he published a refutation of the attacks of Andrew Fitzjohn Sall against the Catholic Church.
He resigned or was relieved of the Rectorship at Poitiers in 1679, apparently for the publication against the apostate Sall. So, he retired to his province of origin (CAST) and died at Valladolid on 30 December of the same year.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Brown, Ignatius
by Terry Clavin

Brown, Ignatius (1630–79), Jesuit, was born on either 1 or 9 November 1630 in Co. Waterford, and by the late 1640s he was studying philosophy at Compostella in Spain. On 27 June 1651 he entered the Society of Jesus as a novice at Villagarcia before resuming his studies, this time in theology, at Valladolid. Following his ordination c.1658, he remained in Valladolid, where he taught philosophy for a period.

In spring 1663 he travelled to Ireland in the company of another Jesuit, Andrew Sall (qv), to join the Jesuit mission in his native land. From his base in Waterford, he toured south Munster, ministering to the faithful. Although he was arrested in 1668, an Irish noble quickly arranged his release. On 15 August of the same year he pronounced his final vows. In 1671 he was transferred to Drogheda, and was appointed superior of the Jesuit house in Dublin two years later. However, he never took up this position, due to poor health, and withdrew to the Continent via England.

By autumn 1673 he was in Paris, where he played a role in efforts to establish a foundation for the Irish Jesuits in France. Royal permission to establish such a house in the Jesuit province of Aquitaine was duly granted in April 1674, after which Brown purchased a building in Poitiers. He and his Irish colleagues hoped that the foundation would function as a seminary, but the Jesuit general refused to permit this. Instead it was to provide an education for young lay Irish Catholics and to act as a refuge or place of retirement for Jesuits on the Irish mission. He did not obtain actual possession of the house till winter 1675–6, and was formally appointed rector of the Irish college at Poitiers in April 1676. In 1677 the college was described as having many boarders. The college was expected to be funded by donations from Irish Catholics, but the actual sources of its endowments are uncertain and aroused the suspicion of Brown's superiors. It appears that the college was mainly funded by largesse from the Portuguese queen of England, Catherine of Braganza.

Meanwhile, his former colleague and travelling companion Sall had created a sensation in Ireland by converting to protestantism in 1674, a decision that he sought to justify in a sermon preached at Christ Church cathedral, in which he outlined a number of what he saw as false doctrines upheld by the catholic church, placing particular emphasis on its claim of infallibility. In 1675 Brown published his The unerring and unerrable church, in which he vigorously upheld this claim, arguing that scripture required an infallible authority to interpret it. Sall's apostasy had attracted a plethora of catholic denunciations, but it is a testament to Brown's skill as a controversialist that Sall devoted the bulk of his True catholic and apostolic faith (1676) to refuting his criticisms. Brown wrote under a pseudonym, leaving Sall unaware of the identity of his bitterest critic. Brown unleashed a final salvo against Sall with his An unerrable church or none (1678).

In early 1679 he resigned as rector of the Irish college and went to Castile to serve as confessor to the niece of King Louis XIV of France, Marie Louise, who had just married King Charles II of Spain. He died 30 December 1679 at Valladolid. He appears to have been the author of a pamphlet entitled Pax vobis. Purporting to be a dialogue between two English protestants, this was a theological satire directed against the protestant religion. Published in 1679, it went through six editions in the ensuing decade and was popular among English catholics.

F. Finegan, ‘The Irish college of Poitiers: 1674–1767’, IER, 5th ser., civ (July–Dec. 1965), 18–35; L. McRedmond, To the greater glory (1991); T. H. Clancy, ‘Pax vobis, 1679: its history and author’, Recusant History, xxiii (1996–7), 27–33; ODNB

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BROWN, IGNATIUS. There were two Fathers of this name.
The senior was born at Waterford in 1630, and after studying a course of Philosophy at Compostella, there enrolled himself at the age of 21, amongst the children of St. Ignatius. In a letter of F. St. Leger, dated Compostella, the 16th of January, 1663, 1 read, “Towards the beginning of Spring, F. Andrew Sall* and F. Ignatius Brown are to leave this Province for the Irish Mission. Both are learned, zealous, and duly qualified”. The Annual Letters shew that he, with FF. Maurice Connell and Robert Mead formed a glorious Triumvirate - that he excelled as a powerful and indefatigable preacher a son of Thunder at Cork, at Drogheda, and other towns in Ireland. His zeal made him several enemies : he was threatened with imprisonment and exile; but he was superior to fear, and he steadily persevered in the exercise of his Apostolic functions, until the summer of 1673, when the state of his health obliged him to go to England for the benefit of the Hot Baths. In the early part of November, the same year, he proceeded to Paris, where by his active industry, and the influence of Pere Ferrier, Confessor to Louis XIV, and by the generosity of friends, especially Catharine, Queen of Charles II, he procured in the year following Letters patent for the erection of an Irish House of Studies at Poitiers : and he was appointed its first Rector. His death happened late in the year 1679, at Valladolid, on his way to Madrid, where he had been appointed Confessor to her Majesty the Queen of Spain. We have from the sprightly pen of this Father :
1 “The Unerring and Unerrablc Church”, ( in reply to a sermon of Andrew Sall, preached at Christ’s Church, Dublin, on the 5th of July, 1674), Svo. 1675, pp. 310.
2 “An Unerrable Church or None”, 9 Svo. 1678, pp. 3-i2.
3 “Pax Vobis”. It seems that the MS. had been left with the English Fathers. The General of the Society, Charles de Noyelle, had heard of it, and on the 13th of March, 1683, gave directions to the English Provincial. F John Keynes, to report to him an opinion of its merits. His answer is dated Ghent, the 23rd of September following. In sending the judgment of those who had examined “the posthumous work of F. Ignatius Brown, written in English, entitled Pax Vobis”, he says “All united in admiring the vein of humour that pervades the work; but thought the publication inexpedient, taking all circumstances into consideration”. F. Keynes, after reading the work, coincided in their opinion. It has since been frequently printed.
Another work called Pax Vobis by E. G. was edited in 1679. Query. Who was the author?
Pax Vobis, an epistle to the Three Churches, a small octavo of 14-1 pp. printed in London in 1721, is said by the Rev. John Kirk, p. 80, Vol. V. Catholicon, to have had Dodd, the Historian, for its Author.

Browne, Richard, d 1672, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/962
  • Person
  • d 10 March 1672

Entered Aquitaniae Province and died 10 March 1672, at the Irish College, Poitiers, France.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BROWN, RICHARD. In a letter of F. James Mambrecht, (Superior of his brethren in Scotland) to the General Vincent Caraffa, and dated 29th October, 1646, Father Brown is recommended as a fit successor in the place recently occupied by F. Robert Gall, who had been transferred from the mission to Douay. He says that he would be a most useful work man in those difficult times; that he was well known to many in Scotland, and that he would be well received by them. Fr. Brown remained in Scotland for some years; but about the year 1663 he was obliged by the violence of the persecution raging there, to quit it. The time and place of his death are not known. He had a talent for preaching, and before he went to Scotland, had taught philosophy in the French provinces

Buckley, Robert, 1619-1680, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2290
  • Person
  • 14 August 1619-27 July 1680

Born: 14 August 1619, Wales
Entered: 24 August 1640, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1649 Bordeaux
Final Vows: 25 April 1658
Died: 27 July 1680, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

Appears in Old/15 and CATSJ A-H

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BUCKLEY, ROBERT, of Wales, was appointed to the Penitentiary, at St. Peter’s, in October, 1672; died at Rome, 6th July, (another account says 27th of July) 1680, aet. 61, Soc. 40.

Burke, Richard, 1621-1694, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/970
  • Person
  • 01 October 1621-27 January 1694

Born: 01 October 1621, Meelick, County Clare
Entered: 21 June 1640, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Final Vows: 25 April 1659, Salamanca, Spain
Died: 27 January 1694, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Castellanae Province (CAST)

Alias de Burgo Arévalo
Superior of Irish Mission 13 July, 1669-08 October 1672 and 07 December 1687 to 30 April 1689

1651 was in 1st year Theology in Salamanca. Name is mentioned as one who might be Superior of Irish Seminary in Spain.
1655 Operarius at College of Salamanca
1666 ROM Catalogue : Is near Galway, Consultor of the Mission, helping his uncle Archbishop of Tuam; successful in reconciling enemies, on Mission for 4 years
1672 Was Superior of Irish Mission March 1672
1679-87 Spiritual Father at Irish College Poitiers
1690-1694 at Poitiers where he died
Fr Richard Burk RIP in 1693 (Arch Coll Rom XXVI)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Nephew of John de Burgo, Archbishop of Tuam
1644-1648 After First Vows he was sent for studies which were interrupted due to ill health, so back in Ireland 1644-1648 teaching Humanities
Having completed his studies at the Royal College, Salamanca, he was Ordained priest and for a time engaged in preaching Parish missions. His later years in Spain were devoted to teaching at the College of Arévalo.
1659 He joined his uncle, the exiled Archbishop, in Brittany and returned with him to Ireland in 1662
1662 He took up residence at Portumna and worked as a missioner in Connaught until his appointment as Superior of the Mission, 13 July, 1669. His term of Office only lasted until 08 October 1672 as his health did not allow him to carry out his duties
During the Titus Oates Plot he was exiled to France and served as Procurator at the Irish College in Poitiers, until he returned to Ireland in 1685.
1687-1689 Superior of Irish Mission for a second time, 07 December 1687 to 30 April 1689, when he was relieved of office at his own request.
1690 He returned to the Irish College, Poitiers where he died in 27 January 1694

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962

Richard Burke (1669-1672)

Richard Burke, nephew of John Burke, Archbishop of Tuam, was born at Meelick in September, 1621. He entered the Society of Jesus in Spain on 21st June, 1640. His course of study was interrupted owing to ill-health, and he had to return to Ireland, where he taught humanities for four years (1644-48). He returned then to Spain, and completed his philosophy and theology at the Royal College of Salamanca. He gave many missions throughout Castile in the years that followed, but a haemorrhage of the throat forced him to withdraw to the less strenuous occupation of teaching grammar in the College of Arevalo, where he made his solemn profession of four vows on 25th April, 1659. At the end of that year he joined his uncle, the exiled Archbishop of Tuam, in Brittany, and returned. with him to Ireland in October, 1662. He was stationed at Portumna, and worked as missioner in Connacht until his appointment as Superior of the Irish Mission on 13th July, 1669. He organised several Residences and opened schools in many towns. His health continued poor, and his request to be allowed to resign was acceded to on 8th October, 1672.

Richard Burke (1687-1689)

When banished in 1679, Fr. Richard Burke acted as Procurator of the Irish College at Poitiers, until he was recalled to Ireland in 1685, He was appointed Superior of the Mission for the second time on 7th December, 1687. He continued Fr, Relly's work of opening schools and reorganising the Mission, in spite of his advanced age and many infirmities. His repeated petition to be relieved of the burden was at last heard on 30th April, 1689. A year later, in the midst of the turmoil of war, he retired to the Irish College of Poitiers, where he died on 27th January, 1694.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Richard Bourke 1621-1694
Richard Bourke, nephew of John Burke, Archbishop of Tuam, was born at Meelick County Galway in 1621. Most of his studies were carried out in Spain, where for some years he was engaged as a Missioner in Castille. In 1659 he joined his uncle in Brittany and returned with him to Ireland in 1662. He was stationed at Portumna, and he worked as a Missioner in Connaught until his appointment as Mission Superior in 1669.

He organised several residences and opened schools in many towns. Arrested in 1679 in connection with the Titus Oates’ Plot, he was banished to Poitiers. Returning to Ireland in 1685, he was again Mission Superior in 1687. In spite of his age an infrmities, he continues opening schools.

On relinquishing office, he retired to Poitiers, where he died on January 27th 1694, aged 73 years.

He did valiant work for the Mission in trying and perilous times and richly deserves to be commemorated in our menology.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BURKE, RICHARD, nephew to Dr. John Burke, Archbishop of Tuam, joined the Order in Spain, where I meet him in January, 1659. On 20th January, 1670, he reached Dublin as Superior of his BB. in Ireland, then 33 in number. After the 20th of May, 1679, when he was out on bail and daily expecting banishment, I lose sight of him. He is described as a religious, prudent, affable Superior, and a general favourite.

Byrne, Felix, 1659-1720, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/986
  • Person
  • 02 November 1659-18 March 1720

Born: 02 November 1659, Dublin
Entered: 21 September 1678, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 1691, La Flèche, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1696
Died: 18 March 1720, Caen France - Franciae Province (FRA)

1681 at La Flèche (FRA)
1683 Professor at Coillege of Quimper (FRA) teaching Grammar for 3 years
1690 at La Flèche (FRA)
1693 at Vannes (FRA)
1696 at Rennes College
1700-1720 at Caen College

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1712 In France and recommended as a fit Rector for Poitiers College.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1680-1683 After First Vows he studied Philosophy at La Flèche
1683-1688 He then spent five years Regency at Quimper after which he returned to La Flèche for Theology, and was Ordained there 1691.
Initially after Ordination he taught Philosophy and Vannes and then Rennes, but was thought to be more interested in the classroom of a secondary school, and so, he was sent to Caen as Prefect of Studies, a post he held until 1712.
1712 The Irish Mission proposed him as Rector of the Irish College at Poitiers, but it did not happen. He remained at Caen as an operarius until his death 18 March l720

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BYRNE, FELIX. He was serving in the French Province in the Spring of 1712, and was recommended as a fit person to govern the College at Poitiers for the Irish Mission

Byrne, Milo, 1671-1746, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/989
  • Person
  • 10 October 1671-18 December 1746

Born: 10 October 1671, Dublin
Entered: 02 October 1691, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 1704, La Flèche, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1706
Died: 18 December 1746, Dublin Residence - Romanae Province (ROM)

Before entering was a Master of Arts at Poitiers
1711 Teacher at Moulins College (FRA)
1714 in Ireland
Professor of Philosophy, learned man, good poet. Was also private chaplain to a family

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1713 In France and about to travel to Ireland
1714-1717 In Ireland
he had been a Professor of Philosophy and was a learned man and good poet.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education at the Jesuit School in Dublin and then graduated with an MA from Poitiers, before Ent 02 October 1691 Paris
1693-1700 After First Vows he was sent for an extra year of Rhetoric at the Novitiate and then the next six years Regency at Nevers (1694-1699) where he brought his first class as far as Rhetoric, and then at Vannes (1699-1700).
1700-1704 He was then sent to La Flèche for Theology being Ordained there in 1704.
1705-1706 Made Tertianship at Rouen
1706-1710 He taught Philosophy at Nevers and Moulins
1711-1713 he was sent for two years teaching Humanities at the Irish College, Poitiers
1713/1714 Winter he was sent to Ireland with Michael Murphy, and for thirty years taught Humanities in Dublin in close collaboration with Canon John Harold’s ecclesiastical Academy. In his latter years he seems to have taken little part in active ministry, as he suffered greatly from scruples. He died in Dublin 18 December 1746
In his time he was considered an accomplished Latinist, and he did publish some verse, though this has not been recorded in Jesuit bibliographies.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BYRNE, MILO. I find by F. Walt. Lavelin’s letter of the 1st of January, 1713, that this Father was preparing to quit the College at Poitiers for the Irish Mission.

Cahill, Patrick, 1708-1766, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/997
  • Person
  • 06 March 1708-16 December 1766

Born: 06 March 1708, New Ross, County Wexford
Entered: 13 July 1730, Nancy, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)
Ordained: 23 September 1742, Tours, France
Final Vows: 15 August 1746
Died: 16 December 1766, France/Ireland - Campaniae Province (CAMP)

1737 Teaching Humanities at Sens
1741-1744 Studying Theology and Prefect of Boarders at Irish College Poitiers
1746 at Charleville (CAMP) teaching Humanities and Philosophy
1748 Sent to Poitiers and also is in Ireland. Back in Poitiers 1749
1752 Procurator at Poitiers
1763-1767 in Ireland
Some confusion over dates he was in Poitiers and in Ireland - including saying he was said to be still in Ireland in 1767

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1748 Taught Humanities for five years and Philosophy for three at Charleville (in pen)
1752 Procurator at Irish College Poitiers (in pen)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ General Notes
After First Vows he studied Philosophy at Pont-à-Mousson (1733-1735) and then Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers. In the meantime he had spent seven years in regency at Épinal, Sens and Auxerre.
1740-1744 He was sent for Theology to Grand Collège Poitiers, whilst living at the Irish College there. He was Ordained at Tours 23/09/1742
1744-1747 After Ordination and completing his formation he held a Chair of Philosophy at Charleville CAMP
1748-1755 At Poitiers as Procurator of the Irish College for seven years, when it is thought he was to go to Ireland. he is mentioned in subsequent CATS as being in Ireland, but at that time this could also mean at one of the Irish Colleges or Mission

According to CAMP CAT he was living in Ireland up to 1767, but there is no evidence to support this. He may be identical with a Father Cahill living at Bordeaux in 1759, and could have been working with a large colony of Irish there. The date and place of his death are unknown.

Cahill, Philip, 1672-1738, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/998
  • Person
  • 02 July 1672-08 June 1738

Born: 02 July 1672, County Waterford
Entered: 13 October 1710, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Died: 08 June 1738, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1711-1717 at Irish College Poitiers as Cook
1723 Cook and Emptor at Palencia College
1724-1730 at Irish College Poitiers
1733-1738 at Irish College Poitiers
“strong, humble and modest. Rather slow at work”

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
From entry for the next 15 years he was at various houses in AQUIT
1725-1738 Assistant Bursar at Irish College Poitiers. This included a brief sojourn in the Irish Mission in 1731 from which he returned due to ill health. he died at Irish College Poitiers 08 June 1738

Cesbron-Lavau, Etienne, 1907-1983, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1039
  • Person
  • 26 December 1907-18 September 1983

Born: 26 December 1907, Poitiers, Vienne, France
Entered: 16 October 1926, Laval, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 30 May 1940
Professed: 02 February 1944
Died: 18 September 1983, Taichung, Taiwan - Sinensis Province (CHN)

by 1958 came to Kingsmead Singapore (HIB) working 1957-1959

Chamberlain, Edward, 1644-1709, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1040
  • Person
  • 04 August 1644-05 October 1709

Born: 04 August 1644, Dublin
Entered: 23 October 1666, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1674, Rome, Italy
Final Vows: 15 August 1680
Died: 05 October 1709, Dublin

Alias Kitson

Studied for 5 years at Tournai (BELG) the 3 years in Rome (ROM)
1670 arrested and examined re Peter Talbot
1672 Teacher at Monte Santo and Illyric College, Loreto (ROM) - was Spiritual Coadjutor Penitentiary at Loreto for 3 years
1673 or 1678 Teaching Grammar at Loreto and studying Theology
1679-1682 Procurator of the Irish College at Poitiers (which was opened in 1675)
1683-1691 Dublin Residence and at Carlow College
1695 had spent three years in London
“1697 Fr Chamberlain and other Fathers still in prison 02 May 1697” (Archives Irish College Rome)
1702 Imprisoned and to be deported to Cadiz with Anthony Martin (convicted of being a Jesuit)
“Fr Chamberlain and other old Fathers in Dublin very poor having for 4 years lost what was common and private” (Archives Irish College Rome). Was living at Dominican Convent, Cooke St Dublin

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1683 In Ireland at the Dublin College
1695 In Spain
1697 Living near the Dominican Convent, Cooke St, Dublin (Report of a spy, in St Patrick’s Library MSS Vol iii p 118)
He was a Penitentiary in Loreto for three years; Procurator of Poitiers; In London for three years

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Studied Rhetoric at Tournai and Philosophy at Irish College Rome before Ent 23 October 1666 Rome
After First Vows he was sent for Regency at Monte Santo and Loreto, completing his studies at the Roman College and being Ordained there 1674
After Tertianship he was an English speaking Confessor for pilgrims at Loreto until 1678
1678-1681 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Procurator
1681 Sent to Ireland and to Dublin where he remained until his death 07 October 1709. He taught secondary school for many years and was Procurator of the Dublin Residence when the city fell to the Williamites. He was then imprisoned along with other Jesuits and members of his own family. He was twice sentenced to deportation but managed to remain.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CHAMBERLAIN, MICHAEL. I meet with two Fathers of this name.
The Junior I find engaged at the commencement of James the Second’s reign, with F. James Kelly and F. Hugh Thaly, in teaching a school in Dublin. They had twenty Pensioners, and a respectable Chapel recently erected in that city. He was living in Ireland, but in secret, during the persecution in the Autumn of 1698. Sacellum salis insigne

Clery, Fergal, 1657-1720, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1058
  • Person
  • 06 January 1657-21 November 1720

Born: 06 January 1657, Ireland
Entered: 24 September 1674, Toulouse, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)
Ordained: 1687. Tournon-sur-Rhône, France
Final Vows: 15 August 1691
Died: 21 November 1720, Tournon-sur-Rhône, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)

1686 was in TOLO and asked for in Irish Mission
1690-1691 at Irish College in Poitiers

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Was in TOLO in 1686, and asked for in the Irish Home Mission (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan Sj :
1676-1684 After First Vows studied Philosophy for 2 years at Toulouse and then six years Regency at Billom College.
1684-1687 He resumed Philosophy at Rodez and then to Tournon for Theology where he was Ordained 1687
His abilities were much sought after in TOLO and Irish Mission and the Mission Superior requested he be sent to Ireland because there was thought to be great opportunities for the Mission to expand during the reign of James II, especially in the area of education, but ill health prevented that, and some evidence for this is that the General allowed him to do a very short Tertianship, which he made (1690-1691) at Irish College Poitiers
1691-1697 He returned to TOLO and held a Chair in Philosophy successively at Carcassone, Albi and Le Puy
1697 He was sent as Professor of Philosophy and Prefect of Studies for Scholastics to Tournon, and he remained for 23 years there, also exercising ministry in the Church attached to the College at and he died at Tournon 21 November 1720.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CLERY, FERDINAND, was certainly in the Thoulouse Province in the Spring of 1686. His services were then petitioned for in Ireland. Probably he came over, and in the Revolutionary storm was driven back to the Continent.

Comerford, James, 1626-1712, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1073
  • Person
  • 1626-06 December 1712

Born: 1626, Kilkenny
Entered: 1651, Madrid Spain - Toletanae Province (TOLE)
Ordained: 1658, Murcia
Final Vows: 15 August 1666
Died: 06 December 1712, Irish College, Poitiers, France

1699-1712 at Irish College, Poitiers (1708 taught Grammar and of delicate health)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Three Entries : Some confused dated between James Comerford 2 and James Comerford 3
1698 In exile at Poitiers
Of remarkable piety and zeal; His loss was deplored in Waterford, even many years after his exile. (cf Letter of father Knoles 1714)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already studied Philosophy for two years before Ent 1650 TOLE (Madrid)
After First Vows he was sent to Murcia for studies and was Ordained there 1658
He was later engaged in the following roles : Teaching Humanities; Minister; Teaching Moral Theology and Operarius at various locations : Huesca; Imperial College Madrid; the Residence of Navalcarnero and the Residence of Alcalá all in TOLE
1676 Sent to Ireland and Kilkenny
1694 Consultor of Irish Mission
1698 Arrested and deported to France and sent to Irish College Poitiers, where he was a Consultor up to the time of his death there 06/12/1712
The General of the time highly valued his judgement on maters touching the Irish College Poitiers and the Irish Mission itself.
Such was his contemporaries esteem for him that even in his advanced years he was proposed as Rector at Poitiers
The Superior of the Mission at the time, writing to the General 06 April 1714, recalled his memory : “James Comerford was a man remarkable for holiness whose loss is deplored this day”.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
COMERFORD, JAMES, died in exile, as I find in a letter of the 6th of April, 1714, “insignis pietate”.

Comerfort, Gerard, 1632-1688, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1079
  • Person
  • 18 July 1632-19 March 1688

Born: 18 July 1632, County Waterford
Entered: 01 November 1651, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 31 March 1657, Liège, Belgium
FinalVows: 15 August 1675, Waterford
Died: 19 March 1688, Irish College, Poitiers, France

1655 Catalogue at Liège in 2 years Theology
1680-1688 Irish College, Poitiers, first as Infirmarian, then as Procurator and Minister
also : Germanus recte Gerard Comerford”; RIP 19 March 1687

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1655 In second year of Theology at Liège - had great talents and made great progress in his studies
1658 Taught Mathematics at Liège
1664 A missioner at St George’s Residence, Worcester district
1667 At College of Holy Apostles, Suffolk district

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already begun Priestly studies before Entry 01 November 1651 ANG
1653-1657 After First Vows he was sent for studies, graduating MA, to Liège for Theology and was Ordained there 31 March 1657
1657-1660 After he made Tertianship, for a time he was Prefect of Studies and taught Mathematics at the Juniorate in Liège. He was considered to be a man of more than ordinary ability, but dogged by ill health.
1660-1667 On the Mission in England, at Northampton, Lincoln and Worcester
1667-1675 His whereabouts from 1667 are unclear, except that he had become a member of the Irish Mission by 1672, and strong evidence that he was already in Ireland by December 1669 and at the Waterford Residence (probably for health reasons) and made Final Vows there 15 August 1675. There is little or no account of his work thereafter on the Irish Mission. Because his earlier associations with England were known to the promoters of the Titus Oates Plot, he escaped to France and served as Minister and Procurator of the Irish College Poitiers until his death there 19 March 1688

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
QUEMERFORD, GERARD, a native of Ireland, joined the English Province of the Society in 1651, aet 19. and was studying his second year of Divinity at Liege in 1655. What relation was he to F. James Quemerford?

Corr, James, 1655-1713, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1111
  • Person
  • 04 May 1655-31 August 1713

Born: 04 May 1655, Clonmel, County Tipperary
Entered: 01 October 1675, Avignon, France - Lugdunensis Province (LUGD)
Ordained: c 1688, Avignon, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1693
Died: 31 August 1713, Toulouse, France (Alès, France)

1688 Professor of Mathematics at Irish College Poitiers
1690-1691 Taught Humanities, Rhetoric & Mathematics at Irish College Poitiers

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
712 In LUGD Province. Proposed as fit to be Rector of Irish College Poitiers. He died in the course of 1714

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1677-1679 After First Vows he was sent for Philosophy at Lyons
1679-1684 Sent for Regency at Roanne and Dôle
1684-1688 Sent for Theology to Avignon where he was Ordained was Ordained c 1688
1688-1691 Teaching at the Irish College Poitiers AQUIT,
1691 He then returned to LUGD and made his tertianship at Lyons
1694-1698 Sent to teach Philosophy at Nîmes and Arles
1698-1710 Began Missionary work in the Cévennes
1710 Fr Anthony Knoles, Superior of Irish Mission wanted him appointed Rector of Irish College Poitiers, but instead he was appointed Rector of the Seminary at Alès
1713 While on a Mission at Toulouse, he contracted the plague working among the sick and died 31 August 1713
On the orders of the General Father Cor's library was assigned to the Cork Residence

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
COR, THOMAS, was in the Lyons Province in the spring of 1712, and was proposed as a fit person to be Rector of the national Seminary of Poitiers. He must have died in the course of the year 1714; for I find a letter of F. Lavallin, dated September 6th, 1714, thanking his Superior for allowing him the use of the Library belonging to the deceased F. Cor.

Cotter, Patrick, 1659-1721, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1116
  • Person
  • 15 August 1659-18 June 1721

Born: 15 August 1659, County Cork
Entered: 14 September 1681, Toulouse, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)
Ordained: 1690, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1697
Died: 18 June 1721, Tulle, Limousin, Aquitaine, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1688-1692 Studies Theology, first at Bordeaux then at Poitiers
1693 at College of Saintes AQUIT teaching Humanities and Grammar
1695 at College Périgord, teaching Humanities, Logic and Physics
1696 Tertianship at Bordeaux
1699 at Agen College teaching Logic
1699-1721 at Tulle College Spiritual Father, Teaching Casuistics
Never returned to Ireland. Gentle, prudent clear judgement excellent teacher and administrator

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Philosophy before Ent 1681 Toulouse
After First Vows he spent five years Regency in TOLO Colleges, and then Transcribed to AQUIT
He resumed studies at Bordeaux but completed them at Poitiers, where he was Ordained 1690
He then returned to teach at Humanities at AQUIT Colleges
1686-1699 Sent to hold a Chair of Philosophy at Périgord and then later at Agen
1699 He volunteered to come to the Irish Mission, but he was sent as Spiritual Director and Professor of Theology to Tulle and spent twenty two years there. He became a noted Preacher and died at Tulle 18 June 1721
Contemporary documents speak of his ability for teaching and governing as well as his success in Preaching and Spiritual Direction

Creagh, Peter, 1612-1685, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1121
  • Person
  • 1612-17 November 1685

Born: 1612, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 27 September 1635, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 07 April 1640, Antwerp, Belgium
Professed: 1654
Died: 17 November 1685, Limerick

Alias Piers Crow

His father John was an alderman in Cashel. His mother was Elizabeth Flemine
Studied at Cashel, then Lille, Louvain and Douai under Jesuits
1642 at Lyra (Lier FLA)
1644 First came to Irish Mission
1654 a formed Spiritual Coadjutor
1655-1658 at Arras College (FRA) teaching
1666 Living near Limerick teching Grammar, Catechising and administration - then banished to France for 6 years

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of John and Elizabeth née Flemme. Uncle of Dr Creagh, Archbishop of Dublin.
Early education was at Cashel and then studied Humanities under the Jesuits at Lille and two years Philosophy at Douai at Anchin College before Ent. He was admitted to the Society by the FLA Provincial Frederick Tassis, and Brussels 28/09/1635 (Mechelen Album)
After First Vows he did three years Theology taught Humanities for five years
1642 At the Professed House in Antwerp (FLA Catalogue)
1644 Came to Irish Mission (HIB Catalogue 1650 - ARSI)
1666 Living near Limerick, teaching Grammar and Catechism, and administering the Sacraments
He was an exile in France for six years and on the Mission for twenty-five (HIB CAt 1666 - ARSI)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John (Alderman) and Elizabeth née Fleming
Studied Humanities under lay masters at Cashel and later at the Jesuit College of Lille. He then began Philosophy at Douai before Ent 1640 at Mechelen
After First Vows he was sent for his studies at Antwerp and was Ordained there 07/04/1640
1641-1642 Tertianship at Lierre (Lier)
1644 He sent to Ireland and to the Limerick school to teach Humanities.
1652-1660 Under the “Commonwealth” he was deported to France, where he taught Humanities at Arras College and later Prefect at Bourges
He returned to Ireland again after the restoration, and sent first to Cashel, but then in 1666 until his death he worked as a teacher and catechist at Limerick, where he died 17 November 1685

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Piers Creagh 1612-1685
Piers Creagh was born in Carrigeen Castle 3 miles form Limerick on the Robborough Road in 1612. He was a nephew of the Primate Martyr, and a brother of the Mayor of Limerick who distinguished himself during the siege. Another brother was Domestic Prelate to Alexander VII.

Piers entered the Society in 1637. He was attached to our College in Limerick as a Master, as we find in the examination of Fr Netterville of October 1678. Later he taught at Poitiers, where he had as his pupil his nephew Peter, later Bishop of Cork and finally Archbishop of Dublin.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CREAGH, (or Crow) PETER, was 33 years of age in 1649, and then residing at Limerick

Crolly, Benedict, 1653-1690, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1126
  • Person
  • 26 March 1653-24 March 1690

Born: 26 March 1653, Dublin
Entered: 26 November 1673, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1685, Rome, Italy
Died: 24 March 1690, Drogheda, County Louth

1675 In the Novitiate at St Andrea
1678 In Roman College studying Philosophy for 2 or 3 years
1681 At Sezze College
1685 In 3rd Year Theology at Roman College

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Was educated at the Jesuit School in Tournai before Ent 26 November 1673 in Rome
After First Vows and a course of Philosophy at the Roman College he spent three years Regency at the Colleges of Sezze and Fermo.
1682-1686 Sent to the Roman College for Theology and was Ordained there in 1685
1686-1688 After a short Tertianship he was sent to Irish College Poitiers as Prefect
1688 Returned to Ireland and sent to Drogheda, but died there 24 March 1690

Cronin, Dermot, 1637-1694, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1128
  • Person
  • 26 December 1637-28 November 1694

Born: 26 December 1637, County Cork
Entered: 06 September 1657, Toulouse, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)
Ordained: 20 April 1669, Tournon-sur-Rhône, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1676, Poitiers, France
Died: 28 November 1694, Ballingarry, County Cork - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)

1660 At Toulouse College
“Jerry C = Gemanus or Dom, means that Germanus and Domitius are equivalent of Diarmaid”
1671 Set out for Ireland
1682-1684 Prefect of Studies at Irish College Poitiers

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1671 After studies and Tertianship he came to Ireland
1694 In a poor district of Cork.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1639-1666 After First Vows Studied Philosophy for three years at Toulouse and then spent four years Regency in TOLO Colleges.
1666-1670 He was then sent to Tournon for Theology and Ordained there in 1669
1671-1675 When his studies and Tertianship were complete, he was sent to Ireland and for a while was at the Jesuit School in Drogheda, before heading to the West Cork Mission
1675-1676 Sent to the new Irish College at Poitiers, but spent only a year there including making Final Vows.
1676-1682 He then returned to Ireland continuing his missionary work - presumably in West Cork
1682-1684 After a further six years on the Irish Mission he was sent as Prefect of Studies to Poitiers
1684 He returned to West Cork, though in 1691 he was suggested as Rector of Poitiers, but because he had such a command of the Irish language it was decided to leave him in West Cork. He lived a life of great poverty and died prematurely 02 December 1694

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Dermot Cronin 1637-1694
The tragedy of the history of our Province, is that so little is known of our brethren who “bore the burden of the day and the heats” during the Penal Days. We should be anxious therefore, to perpetuate what little we know, even of the most obscure of them.

Such a man is Fr Dermot Cronin. In a list of Jesuits we find the date 1651 after his name, presumably the date of his entry into the Society. Beyond that, all we know is that he laboured as a parish priest near Drogheda, and that he was so poor that he had to wander about in sheep and goat skins.

He exemplifies the words of St Paul in his Epistle to the Hebrews (9:37) “They were stoned, they were cut asunder, they were tempted, they were put to death by the sword, they wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins, being in want, distressed, afflicted.

His death is recorded in “Fasti Breviores” as taking place probably on December 10th 1694.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CRONIN, DERMOT. On finishing his studies at Toulouse, and his third year of Probation, he was placed at Drogheda towards the end of the year 1671. He excelled as a Preacher and Catechist, and had the advantage over several of his Brethren by his perfect acquaintance with the Irish language. In a letter written by the Superior F. Knoles, at Waterford, on the 25th of November, 1694, it is said that he had a charge of a poor country Parish and had to wander about “in sheepskins and goatskins”, (Heb. c. xi. v. 37. ) on account of the extreme poverty of the Catholics. The Apostolic man must have died a few days later; for the same Superior thus begins a letter, dated the 17th of February, 1695: “On the 9th of December, I wrote announcing the death of F. Dermot Cronin in this Mission, and requesting the usual suffrages for his soul”.

Daly, Francis H, 1848-1907, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/112
  • Person
  • 15 July 1848-19 October 1907

Born: 15 July 1848, Dalysgrove, County Galway
Entered: 12 November 1870, Milltown Park, Dublin
Ordained: 1886
Final Vows: 03 February 1890, St Francis Xavier, Gardiner Street, Dublin
Died: 19 October 1907, St Mary’s, Rhyl, Wales

Part of St Francis Xavier's, Upper Gardiner Street, Dublin at time of his death.

Youngest brother of Hubert - RIP 1918; Oliver - RIP 1916; James - RIP 1930 Oliver was the first of the Daly brothers to Enter.

Early education at Clongowes Wood College SJ

by 1873 at St Beuno’s, Wales (ANG) studying
by 1874 at Roehampton, London (ANG) studying
by 1875 at Laval, France (FRA) studying
by 1877 at Poitiers, France (FRA) Regency
by 1884 at St Aloysius, Jersey, Channel Islands (FRA) studying
by 1886 at St Aloysius, Jersey, Channel Islands (FRA) studying
by 1902 at Holy Name, Manchester (ANG) Missions

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Third brother of Hubert - RIP 1918; Oliver - RIP 1916; James - RIP 1930 Oliver was the first of the Daly brothers to Enter. They were a very old Catholic family who resided in the Elphin Diocese. Oliver joined earlier than the others in Rome and was allotted to the Irish Province.

After First Vows he studied Philosophy in France and Theology in jersey.
He taught for many years at Belvedere, Clongowes, and Mungret.
He also served on the Mission Staff in Ireland for a short time, and then he went to Manchester as a Missioner.
He received permission to go to Rhyl for a rest, had a stroke there and never recovered consciousness.
Some Fathers from St Beuno’s assisted at the requiem Mass in St Mary’s Rhyl. He was then buried at Pantasaph, North Wales.

Appreciation by Vincent Naish preached at the Church of the Holy Name Manchester :
“...it is my duty, my dear brethren, to ask your prayers on behalf of the soul of my dear old friend and fellow-worker, Francis Daly. It so happens that it is given to me, by chance, to say a few words in support of my plea. I have had the privilege and pleasure of knowing Father Daly well. Forty three years ago we were boys together at school, and during those years of unbroken friendship I never knew a soul more full of zeal for God’s glory, more possessed with simple faith, and more devoted, in his own sweet way, to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and His Blessed Mother.
Of the family - a grand old Irish Catholic family - five were boys and three girls; he was the youngest of the boys, who became members of the Society of Jesus, of whom all the three elder survive him. One sister joined a religious Order. That family was known throughout the length and breadth of Ireland for its spotless life and perfect devotion, which seemed to unite all the members in the beauty and piety of the family life. There was a family private chapel in the house, and father, mother, boys and girls all joined together each day at God’s altar.”
He continues saying that the four brothers worked in different parts of the world - in Ireland, England, Scotland and Australia. They in the Holy Name Parish who knew of the devotion and zeal of Father Daly were fortunate, because to very few men was it granted in their time to know a more hard-working Priest, devoted to the spiritual welfare of Catholics in this country of Ireland. Hundreds of hopeless fallen cases of human nature he was ever eager to attend to, and by the very simplicity of his faith, and his transparent earnest manner, he often succeeded where others were afraid or shrank from.
He then asked that as many as possible would attend the requiem Mass the following day, and to offer their Communion for the good, holy, zealous Priest who had gone to his reward. At the end of Mass the organist played the “Dead March” from Saul, and the people stood.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Francis Daly 1848-1907
Fr Francis Daly, who died at Rhyl North Wales on October 19th 1907, was the author of “The Child of Mary before Jesus Abandoned in the Tabernacle”. In 1953, this book had entered on its 38th edition, enjoys to this day a steady sale of 582,000 copies. He was on the staff of Mungret College when he compiled this prayer book. At his request, the profits accruing were expended on the furnishing and establishment of the sacristy of the Boy’s Chapel.

Francis was the youngest of five sons, four of whom became Jesuits, the others being Oliver, James and Hubert. Born in Ahascragh County Galway in 1848, he entered the Society at Milltown Park in 1870.

He taught for many years in Belvedere, Clongowes and Mungret. After some years on the Mission Staff he went to Manchester as a missionary.

While resting at Rhyl in 1907 he had an apoplectic stroke, cause by over exertion in his labours, from which he never recovered. He is buried at Pantasaph, North Wales.

Dillon de Coughlan, Joseph, 1669-1737, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1185
  • Person
  • 19 March 1669-01 January 1737

Born: 19 March 1669, Athlone, County Westmeath
Entered: 14 January 1687, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1698, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 16 March 1704
Died: 01 January 1737, Limoges, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1689 First Vows 15 January 1689
1693-1694 at Tulles College AQUIT
1695 Teaching Rhetoric at Nantes College AQUIT
1696 Teaching Rhetoric at La Rochelle College AQUIT
1700 Teaching Rhetoric at Poitiers
1703 Teaching Philosophy at La Rochelle
1705 Teaching at Tulles and FV
1711 At Agen College teaching and Preaching. Prefect of the School
1714 At Limoges College
1717 At Bordeaux College
1722-1723 Minister of Irish College Poitiers

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had started Philosophy before Ent 14 January 1687 Bordeaux
1689-1690 After First Vows he was sent to Philosophy to Pau
1690-1696 He was sent for six years of Regency at Tulle, Saintes and La Rochelle. He then studied Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and was Ordained there in 1698
Towards the end of his Tertianship, he asked the General to serve on the Irish Mission. The General was concerned about the political state of the country and so was not inclined to send him there. A little later the General relented, but at that time the Mission Superior did not want any new arrivals, as he believed it might jeopardise the work and lives of those already there.
In AQUIT he had a distinguished career as Professor and later a Missioner.
1722-1723 Minister at Poitiers
Died at Limoges 1727

Doyle, William, 1716-1785, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1217
  • Person
  • 14 April 1716-15 January 1785

Born: 14 April 1716, Dunsoghly, County Dublin
Entered: 15 March 1735, Nancy, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)
Ordained: 22 September 1747, Rheims, France
Final Vows: 15 August 1752
Died: 15 January 1785, Cowley Hill, St Helens, Lancashire, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Transcribed to ANG 1771

Cousin of John Austin - RIP 1784
Ordained with John Austin (his cousin) at Rheims 22/09/1747 by Bishop Joppensi

1740 Teaching Humanities at Lyon College
1743-1746 Teaching Humanities at Rheims College and Studying Theology
1749 Is a Priest at Poitiers
1754 Is in Ireland
1758 At Autun College (AQUIT) as Missioner and Minister
1761 At Rheims, a Master of Arts, Missioner and Preacher; Also at College of Colmar
1762 At College of Strasbourg
1763 At Pont-à-Mousson
1764 At Residence of Saint-Michiel (CAMP)
1766 At Probation House Nancy

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
The CAMP Catalogue of 1766 gives the dates DOB 14 April 1717, and Ent 15 March 1735, and places him in Tertianship in Nancy in 1766 (perhaps there were two? - cf Foley’s Collectanea)
Taught Humanities; Prefect at Poitiers for one year
1750-1755 On the Dublin Mission as assistant PP
Subsequently transcribed to ANG
1771 At St Aloysius College in the Lancashire District

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
After First Vows he was sent for Philosophy and graduated MA at Pont-á-Mousson
He then spent time on regency in CAMP Colleges until 1744
1744 Studied Theology at Rheims and was Ordained there 22/09/1747
1747-1749 Two years as Prefect at Irish College Poitiers, and completing his studies at Grand Collège
1749-1750 Sent to Marennes for Tertianship
1750-1755 Sent to Ireland and was worked as an Assistant Priest in Dublin
1755-1757 Sent as Prefect at the Irish College Poitiers
1757-1768 Recalled to CAMP and worked as a Missioner for eleven years at Autun, Rheims, Strasbourg and Saint-Michel
1768 Most likely Transcribed to ANG working in the Lancashire Mission certainly by 1771 and remained there working around the Cowley Hill district, near St Helen’s until he died 15/01/1785

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
DOYLE, WILLIAM, of Dublin was born on the 30th of May, 1717, and entered the Society in Champagne 12th of July, 1734. After teaching Humanities for five years, and filling the office of Prefect in the Seminary at Poitiers for one year, he came to the Mission at the age of 33, and for several years was assistant to a Parish Priest in Dublin. I find him labouring in the Lancashire Mission in 1771. This Rev. Father died at Cowley hill, near St. Helen s, on the 15th of January, 1785, and was buried at Windleshaw,

Eustace, Thomas, 1636-1700, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1261
  • Person
  • 25 November 1638-30 January 1700

Born: 25 November 1638, Craddockstown, County Kildare
Entered: 01 December 1658, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1669, Palermo, Sicily
Final Vows: 02 February 1676
Died: 30 January 1700, Irish College, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

1675-1686 at Fermo College (ROM) teaching Philosophy and Grammar - and 1681 teaching Theology at Macerata College
1693-1700 At Irish College in Rome taught Theology, Philosophy and Humanities : Rector 1695-1698

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1692-1695 Rector at Rome. While there in 1692, he received letters from Fathers Relly and Wesly at Poitiers. He sought and procured for the “meritorious and afflicted Irish Mission” 50,000 reales from Fr Emmanuel de Sylva SJ, Lisbon. In 1693 he received a further letter from Father Relly, which was directed to the Greek College, Rome. On 05 February 1695, he received from Father Ininger of Ingolstadt, 500 scudi, or 1,000 florins for the Irish Mission.
In 1690 he was at Poitiers when his nephew William, a lieutenant Sir Maurice Eustace’s infantry writes to tell him that his brother has been killed at the siege of Limerick, “riding as a volunteer”. He also asks him to get him transferred into Tyrconnell’s Horse, in which regiment he would have less work and more pay.
1697 There is a petition against him by his sister-in-law, Mrs Eustace at Craddockstown.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of William and Jane née Whyte (daughter of Nicholas Whyte at Leixlip)
Had already studied Philosophy at Antwerp before Ent 02 December 1658 Rome
After First Vows he was sent for Regency at Fermo, and then studied Theology at Palermo where he was Ordained c 1669
1669-1671 Sent teaching at Ascoli
1671-1672 Tertianship at Florence
1672-1678 Taught Philosophy and Theology at Fermo, and also spent one year during that time as Penitentiary at Loreto
1679-1681 Sent to Macerata College to teach Philosophy
1681-1683 Sent to Irish College Rome as Prefect of Studies
1683-1684 Sent to Fermo College again to teach Dogmatic Theology
1684-1690 Sent to Ireland and was appointed Superior of the Dublin Residence and school, and was also made a Consultor of the Mission, and was though to be a very suitable candidate for Mission Superior. He remained there until the Williamite conquest, and the Mission Superior Lynch sent him to Rome as Procurator of the Irish Mission. On the way he spent a year at Poitiers to attend to urgent financial business of the Mission in the immediate aftermath of the fall of Dublin.
1691 Arrived in Rome and proved himself a tower of strength of the mission during the darkening years that preceded the penal times acting as procurator of the Irish Mission.
1694 Appointed Rector of Irish College Rome 10 October 1694 and died in office 30 January 1700.

FitzGerald, Michael, 1694-1781, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1293
  • Person
  • 02 July 1694-17 January 1781

Born: 02 July 1694, Dungarvan, County Waterford
Entered: 12 September 1716, Toulouse, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)
Ordained: 1726
Final Vows: 07 May 1732
Died: 17 January 1781, Waterford Residence

There had been a dispute regarding his date of death 1781 or 1791. This was resolved by the “Account Book” of Fr Fullam indicating that his tombstone at St Patrick’s Waterford says 17 January 1781

Superior of Irish Mission 29 October 1750-1759

1727 Came home (CAT of 1761 says returned in 1721)
1729-1738 In Ireland (TOLO CAT) - Head of Irish Mission 1732 & 1735
1738-1745 Rector of Irish College Poitiers
1743 Had been 10 years on Mission - Fr General proposed to make him Superior of Mission
1745-1749 Rector of Irish College Rome
1760 Was at Waterford

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Had taught Humanities

1727 Sent to Ireland
1732 & 1735 head of Irish Mission
1737-1745 Rector of Irish College Poitiers
1745-1749 Rector of Irish College Rome
1776 he was in Waterford

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had previously studied Philosophy before Ent 12 September 1716 Toulouse

After First Vows he was sent for Regency at Perpignan, then completed his Philosophy at Rodez, and was sent again on Regency to Albi.
1723-1727 Studied Theology at Tournon and was ordained there 1726
1727 Sent to Ireland and studied Mission procedures under Ignatius Kelly at Waterford
1729-1738 Sent to Galway to re-open the Galway Residence in response to repeated petitions from locals.
1738-1746 Rector of Irish College Poitiers
1746-1750 Rector of Irish College Rome 12/02/1746
1750 Appointed Superior of Irish Mission 29/10/1750. During the nine years of Office he normally lived at Waterford.
Little is known of his life after 1760 except that he was at Waterford until his death 17 January 1781.

He was buried in St. Patrick's churchyard with his brother, Patrick, parish priest of Trinity parish in that city.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Michael FitzGerald (1750-1759)

Michael FitzGerald, was born at Dungarvan, in the diocese of Lismore, on or about 2nd July, 1694. After studying philosophy for two years he entered the Novititate of the Society at Toulouse on 12th September, 1716. Having taught grammar at Perpignan for two years, studied metaphysics at Rhodez and taught humanities at Alby, he studied theology at Tournon (1723-27), where he was ordained priest in 1726. He returned to Ireland in December, 1727, and after passing eighteen months in a kind of probation under the eye of Fr Ignatius Roche at Waterford, he was sent in the summer of 1729 to re-open the Residence of Galway, in answer to repeated petitions of the citizens. He made his solemn profession of four vows in Galway on 7th May, 1732, and remained there till 1738, when he was appointed Rector of the Irish College of Poitiers, He was summoned to Rome in 1745, left Poitiers on 8th October of that year, and became Rector of the Irish College of Rome on 12th February, 1746. After four and a half years in that office he was appointed Superior of the Irish Mission on 29th October, 1750. During his nine years of government he resided usually at Waterford. There, too, he continued to work after his Superiorship came to an end, until the suppression of the Society. This event he survived for many years, and died a very old man at Waterford in 1791.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Michael Fitzgerald 1694-1791
Fr Michael Fitzgerald was born in Waterford on or aboiut July 2nd 1694. He entered the Society at Toulouse in 1716 and returned to ireland a priest in 1727.

Having passed eighteen months at Waterford in a kind of tertianship under Fr Ignatius Roche, he was sent to Galway to reopen the Residence there at the request of some citizens in 1729.

There he remained until 1738, when he was made rector of our College at Poitiers. In 1746 he became Rector of the irish College in Rome. He was recalled to ireland to become Superior of the Mission, a post he held 1750-1759. During this period he resided normally in Waterford.

On the Suppression of the Society he continued to work among the people of Waterford and died there in 1791 at the age of 97.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note :
Michael Fitzgerald
Those marked with * were working in Dublin when on 07/02/1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
FITZGERALD, MICHAEL, was born in Minister on the 2nd of July, 1694, and united himself to the Society at Thoulouse, 12th of September, 1716. He returned to Ireland as a Missionary in 1727, and was admitted to the Profession of the Four Vows on the 7th of May, 1732. After serving the Mission ten years, he was ordered to the Seminary at Poitiers, which he governed for nearly eight years, and then proceeded to Rome, where he was Rector of the Irish College for more than four years. He was Superior of his brethren in Ireland in 1755 : but when he died I know not.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

Frayne, Nicholas, 1668-1722, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1330
  • Person
  • 24 November 1668-01 May 1722

Born: 24 November 1668, Dublin
Entered: 25 November 1688, Toulouse, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)
Ordained: 1702, Tournon sur Rhône, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1706
Died: 01 May 1722, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Studied 3 years Philosophy and 4 years Theology in Society and taught Humanities
1717-1722 Rector of Irish College at Poitiers
1717 Catalogue Middling ability, lives with a private family in Dublin. Humble and modest with good judgement and loves the institute.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Most zealous for the education of youth; Was alive to the heretical ways of Jansenists, and waged war upon them

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
After First Vows studied Philosophy at Toulouse
1693-1700 Regency at Castres, Carcassone and Albi
1700-1703 Theology at Tournon where he was Ordained 1702
1703-1704 Tertianship at Toulouse
1704-1707 Sent to teach Humanities at Aurillac
1707-1717 Sent to Ireland, teaching a school at the house of a nobleman near Dublin and assisting local priests. He had a very good reputation as a teacher.
1717 Rector Irish College Poitiers. Hoping to increase the income of the College he imprudently invested the greater part of the College's and Mission's moneys in the worthless Mississippi scheme of John Law, bringing the College to near bankruptcy. The shock he experienced proved too much for him and he died there shortly after the disaster 01 May 1722

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
FRAYN, NICHOLAS. This Father was certainly living in Ireland in the Autumn of 1712.

Galwey, James, 1655-1732, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1347
  • Person
  • 07 March 1655-17 February 1732

Born: 07 March 1655, Co Cork
Entered: 18 February 1677, Naples, Italy - Neapolitanae Province (NAP)
Ordained: c 1688, Naples, Italy
Final Vows: 15 August 1695, Bavaria, Germany
Died: 17 February 1732, Amberg, Bavaria, Germany - Germaniae Superioris Province (GER SUP)

1683-1685 Theology at Naples
1685-1686 Not in Catalogue
1689-1691 Procurator at Irish College Poitiers
1695 At Louvain 16/08/1695 and then left that Province
1699-1700 In Poitiers

◆ Fr John MacErlean SJ :
1683-1688 Studies in Germany
1689 Intended for the Scottish Mission this was prevented by the Revolution and consequent persecution, so he spent the next 10 years at Colleges in Europe
1699-1702 Accompanied Fr John O’Daly to the West Indies and was stationed at St Kitts until English occupation in 1702
1702-1732 Returned to Europe

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
GALWEY, JAMES. I read in a letter of the Superior Anthony Knoles, dated Waterford, the 21st of November, 1695 “I have written to F. James Galwey to continue in Belgium until I can be a better judge of the state of the times, as to his disposal”. In consequence of the dangerous illness of his brother, a merchant of St. Sebastian, he was allowed to quit the College at Poitiers to visit him in the beginning of the year 1697. Two years later, Pere Garganel, Superior of the Mission at Martinique, made application for some Irish Father to assist in that Mission and the neighbouring islands : he represented that there was a great number of Irish in his district that an abundant harvest of souls was opened to the view, and that he and his brethren would cheerfully provide a maintenance for one or two Irish Jesuits, who would assist these souls, together with the French population. It is an historical fact, that with Cromwell’s usurpation began the system of transporting the Irish, as slaves, to the West Indies : for a long time, says the letter, dated the 16th of April, 1699, almost every year, and sometimes often in the year, the English convey from Ireland shiploads of men, boys, and girls, partly crimped, partly carried off by open force, for the purpose of their slave-trade, and thus in process of time, an immense multitude of Irish has been scattered in these islands, but destitute of spiritual succor. This Mission was proposed to F. Galwey, and how it was received the following letter of F. James Kelly, the Rector of the College of Poitiers, the 6th of August, 1699, will best demonstrate. “With the most intense delight F. James Galwey embraces the Mission of Martinique, offered by your Reverence, and he does so with the more confidence in God, as the lot has fallen upon him not in consequence of any expressed wish on his part (for though he wished it, he durst not apply for it); but now he is solely guided by the spirit of obedience. With alacrity he is getting ready for the voyage. F. Garganel, who from his arrival from Martinique, has been on intimate terms with him, is desirous of having him for his companion. In the meanwhile, we cannot but humbly request, that you will not give up, but merely lend F. Galwey to the Martinique Mission; for should our affairs lift up their head again in Ireland, he will be very necessary for us”. Whether F. Galwey ever returned, I have yet to learn.

Galwey, William, 1731-1772, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2324
  • Person
  • 30 September 1731-27 April 1772

Born: 30 September 1731, Carrick-on-Suir, County Tipperary
Entered; 20 September 1752, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Died: 27 April 1772, Waterford

◆ HIB Archive CAT SJ Notes

CATSJ A-H has “Wm Francis Galwey”; DOB 30 September 1731 Carrick-on-Suir; Ent 04 October 1752 or 20 September 1752 in France;
Did MA at Poitiers
1757 At College of Arras (FRA)
1761 2nd year Theologian & Bidell in the Boarding House attached to La Flèche
1762 at La Flèche (FRA)

◆ JC Archive Notes
Wikitree

  1. He was Dean of Waterford. 2. He was educ in Rome, entered the Jesuit Order 20 Sep 1752 (Ref 2 per Rev JB Stevenson SJ). 3. At the time of Anthony Galwey of Rochelle’s marr (1761) Rev WF Galwey was a Jesuit at La Fleche and was chosen to represent his father, but was unable to attend. 4. He was inducted PP of Trinity Within, Waterford, 13 Oct 1767 (It was not uncommon for Jesuits to undertake parochial duties at this period. All members of the Order became secular priests after its suppression, and remained so until its restoration in 1811). 5. He made his will 25 Apr 1772. 6. He was reported to be 'universally beloved and esteemed'. 7. The inscription on his tomb in St Patrick’s churchyard, Waterford styles him ‘Very Rev William Galwey’ (Canon Power considered that ‘Very’ coupled with the fact that his successor was appointed Dean immediately after his death indicates that he was Dean of Waterford (Refs 3 & 4). 8. His will (in which he styles himself ‘gent’ without any ecclesiastical prefix) is printed in Ref 5.

  2. Blackall, H., Galweys of Munster, Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. LXXII No. 215 (Jan-Jun 1967) p. 43.

  3. Records of the Jesuit Order in Ireland. 3. Catholic Record of Waterford & Lismore, 1916-17 4. Power, Hist of Dioc of Waterford & Lismore, p. 274. 5. Waterford Arch Soc Jn, vol 17, 1914, p. 103.

Gillam, James, 1686-1745, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/1365
  • Person
  • 06 June 1686-31 December 1745

Born: 06 June 1686, Dublin
Entered: 02 December 1707, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Final Vows: 02 February 1718, Irish College, Poitiers, France
Died: 31 December 1745, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Alias Williams

1708-1713 Novice, Cook and emptor at Poitiers
1714-1717 At La Rochelle as Cook and emptor
1717-1724 Cook and emptor at Poitiers
1734-1742 Cook buyer and aeditus at various Colleges including Poitiers
At Agen Collège as Emptor and Architriclinus (steward)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
After First Vows He gave faithful service for many years in different houses in AQUIT
1718-1724 and 1731 Sent to Irish College Poitiers where he died 31 December 1745

Gorman, Thomas, 1690-1767, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1377
  • Person
  • 29 December 1690-19 June 1767

Born: 29 December 1690, Clonmel, Co Tipperary
Entered: 09 March 1714 , Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: 1721, Salamanca, Spain
Final Vows: 15 August 1726
Died: 19 June 1767, At sea, Gulf of Corsica - Castellanae Province (CAST)

Taught Grammar 4 years
1737 On the Irish Mission
1761-1762 At the Irish College Poitiers

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied Humanities at Compostella beginning 1709 before Ent.
1724 Sent to Ireland serving in Clonmel, Limerick and Cork, and he was in the latter in 1755 (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
1728 Fixed his Residence as Limerick (cf White’s “History of Limerick)
1763 At Poitiers (Arret de la Cour du Parliament de Paris, 1763)
“Of uncommon talent”; A Good Preacher; Stationed at Clonmel, Limerick and Cork

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Edmund and Margaret née Meagher
He studied Philosophy at Santiago 1709-1712 and having begun Theology at Salamanca Ent there 09 March 1714
After First Vows he was sent to Santiago to teach Humanities and then to Royal College Salamanca for Theology where he was Ordained 1721
1721-1724 Teaching Humanities at Logroño when he was sent to Ireland
1724-1728 Returned to Ireland and sent to Clonmel and worked for four years under Thomas Hennessy
1728-1737 Sent to re-open the Limerick Residence and was there for nine years.
1737-1761 Sent to Cork where he continued his Ministry of Administering Sacraments, Catechising, Preaching and preparing young men to enter the Irish Colleges in Europe.
1761 With Fr General’s permission he retires to the Irish College Poitiers as his health was in decline. He arrived there only a few months before the Society was expelled from France and the College (Irish property) was seized by the state.
1762 He found refuge in his origin Province of CAST and was sent to St Ignatius Church, Valladolid where he lived until the Society was expelled from Spain in 1767
On a journey to an unknown destination - including to the passengers / fellow exiles - he died of hardship at Sea near the Gulf of Corsica 19 June 1767. He was buried at sea.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
GORMAN, THOMAS, born in Munster, on the 29th of December, 1691; was admitted in the Castile Province of the Society, on the 12th of March, 1714 : and ten years later came to the Irish Mission. His services were bestowed at Clonmel, Limerick, and Cork, when he shone as a Preacher. I believe he ended his days at Cork, where I leave him in 1755.

Harrison, John, 1682-1738, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1412
  • Person
  • 29 September 1682-20 February 1738

Born: 26 September 1682, Kilmuckridge, Co Wexford
Entered: 29 November 1702, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: c 1711
Final Vows: 15 August 1720
Died: 20 February 1738, Huesca, Spain - Aragoniae Province (ARA)

Alias Henriquez

Son of Peter Harrison (Henriquez) and Joan née Grace. Brother of James Harrison (Henriquez) RIP 1768

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1724-1728 Rector Santiago (succeeded “James Harrison perhaps should read James O’Connor alias Henriquez)
1728-1730 Rector Santiago from 17 October 1728 (should read Salamanca)
1729 Irish Mission Superior expressed his regret that he is being kept at Salamanca, as he was wanted or himself desired for the Irish Mission
From letters written to him he appears to have been well liked and rendered good service. (cf letters written to him from Joseph Delamer and Thomas Gorman - IER March 1874)
Documents of his are preserved at Salamanca
He wrote a petition to the King of Spain giving an account of the College of Salamanca (Dr McDonald’s “Irish Colleges Abroad”) (though this sounds more like Joseph Delamer?)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Peter and Joan née Grace. Brother of James Harrison (Henriquez)
Had studied Philosophy at Compostella before Ent 29/11/1702 Villagarcía
After First Vows he was sent to Compostella to complete his studies
There is no knowledge bewteen 1705-1714, but he was a priest by 1711
1714-1724 At Valladolid teaching Philosophy after two years post graduate studies and was Chair of Dogmatic Theology
1724-1728 Rector of Irish College Santiago and remained there until he succeeded Joseph Delamar (on his death) as Rector at Irish College Salamanca
1728-1731 Rector of Salamanca, but was deposed after three years later due to ill-considered judgements communicated to others. He had come in for extreme criticism by his Spanish Superiors for his administration at Compostela, and it was suggested that the College became burdened with huge debt and the discipline had become very relaxed. This caused significant embarrassment for the Irish Mission Superior, Ignatius Kelly. He wrote to Ignatius Kelly suggesting that there were eight places available at Compostela for 1730. Ignatius Kelly duly informed the local Archbishops, so that they might choose candidates. Meanwhile Harrison’s Spanish successor as Rector at Compostela wrote to Ignatius Kelly suggesting that there were in fact only four places.. At this point also, Harrison began to question the suitability of candidates for Salamanca sent to him by the Spanish Rector at Compostella. Meanwhile the Archbishops in Ireland wrote to the new General (Retz) both congratulating him and informing him of their concerns regarding the management of the Irish Colleges, and in particular the work of John Harrison.
1731 He fled, unauthorised and unannounced to Ireland and Dublin but was persuaded by Ignatius Kelly to accompany him as far as Poitiers, from where Harrison said he would travel to Rome to meet the General. He didn’t in fact go to Rome. he eventually arrived at Madrid where he stayed two years (1733-1735). After this he was withdrawn by the General from CAST and sent to ARA where he worked at the Church in Huesca until his death 20 February 1738
He was clearly a very talented man, but understood little of the ways of administration or diplomacy. His removal from CAST was damaging both to himself and the way this affected the Irish Jesuit Mission, especially in the Colleges of Spain. As a result of the anger and suspicion, no Irishmen were received in CAST for ten years.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father John Harrison SJ 1702-1738
Not every Jesuit who becomes a Rector becomes an Earl at the same time. This was the fate of Fr John Harrison, born in Kilmuckeridge, Diocese of Ferns, who entered the Society at Compostella in 1702. It happened in this way :
Fr Harrison became Rector of Salamanca in 1728 after the death of Don Dermitio O’Sullivan, who had made our College at Salamanca his universal heir. So Fr Harrison became ipso facto Earl of Beare and Bantry.

He had previously been Rector of Santoago from 17245-1728.

Hennessy, Thomas Aloysius, 1677-1752, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1442
  • Person
  • 10 June 1677-14 April 1752

Born: 10 June 1677, Clonmel, Co Tipperary
Entered: 13 February 1701, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Final Vows: 15 August 1716
Died: 14 April 1752, Clonmel, Co Tipperary

Alias Quades
Mission Vice-Superior 1731-1732
Mission Superior 16 May 1733 until 29 October 1750

Studied 1 year Philosophy and 4 Theology in Society
1706-1707 Studying 1st year Theology at Irish College Poitiers
1708 At La Rochelle Collège
1712 On Irish Mission- built a Church in Clonmel at great expense
1714 CAT Teaching Grammar and Philosophy. At present PP and strong
1717 CAT Has been PP at Clonmel, praise by Archbishop who gives him all powers and privileges. Learned with good judgement. Has already converted many heretics, and would do more were it not for the severe penal laws. The heretics tolerate his ministry. Prone to anger.
1736-1742 Superior of Mission
“Index of Irish Wills” suggests Fr Hennessy died in 1752 - Roman Catholic priest, Clonmel

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1712 Came to Ireland, and worked there to the great good of the flock, and great satisfaction of the Bishop who had given all faculties. He had converted some Protestants, is a learned man of sound judgement (HIB Catalogues 1714 & 1717)
1725 With Father Gorman had charge of Clonmel and its neighbourhood for three miles out (Dr McDonald and Foley’s Collectanea)
1729 Superior of Irish Mission
Professor of Philosophy
Liked even by the Protestants

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had previously studied two years Philosophy before Ent 13 February 1701 Paris
1703-1706 After First Vows he completed his studies and then taught Humanities at La Rochelle for three years
1706-1709 Then he was sent to Poitiers and later Paris for Theology and was Ordained there 1709
1709-1712 He was then sent as Minister to a Flèche Collège and a year later to teach Philosophy at Quimper
1712 Sent to Ireland and as PP at Clonmel - and effectively Vicar General of the united Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore. He was seen by a “priest hunter” giving Benediction in Clonmel and reported to Dublin Castle
1731-1732 Vice Superior of the Irish Mission during the absence of Ignatius Kelly.
1733-1752 Appointed Superior of Irish Mission 16/05/1733 until 29/10/1750, and continued on as PP at Clonmel until his death there 13 April 1752
During his Office as Mission Superior, the number of Jesuits in Ireland doubled. He was however unsuccessful in getting more Irish speaking Jesuits for the Mission. One of the issues in this was that it had been noted that Irish speaking Jesuits generally had a very good facility for European languages, and therefore were a valuable commodity on the Continent.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Thomas Hennessy (1733-1750)
Thomas Louis (or Aloysius) Hennessy was born near Clonmel, in the diocese of Lismore, on or about 10th June, 1677. After studying philosophy for two years he entered the Society in the Novitiate of Paris on 13th February, 1701. After his noviceship he completed his philosophy and taught humanities at Le Rochelle for three years. He began his theology when at the Irish College of Poitiers in 1706, was ordained in 1709, and finished his theological course at Paris. He became Minister of the Boarding College of La Flèche that year (1710-11), and was in the following year Professor of Logic at Quimper. At the end of 1712 he returned to Ireland, and was stationed at Clonmel. Having ventured to give Benediction vested in a cope, a priest-hunter reported on 10th January, 1713, that a Popish Bishop who acted after the rules of a Cardinal had arrived in Clonmel. Dublin Castle, of course, issued orders for the arrest of the Roman Cardinal, but the local authorities, knowing Fr Hennessy, took the matter more quietly. Fr Hennessy acted as Vicar-General for the exiled Bishop of Waterford and Lismore from 1615 on, but did not exercise his authority in matters of jurisdiction. He was Vice-Superior of the Mission during Fr Roche's absence (1731-32), and became Superior of it on 16th May, 1733. During his Superiorship he showed he was a good businessman and a strong personality, but at the same time he manifested his profound religious spirit by prompt obedience to the decisions of his Superiors. The Mission grew under him to almost double its numbers. He died at Clonmel on 13th April, 1752.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Thomas Henessey 1677-1752
On the 10th of June 1677 in Clonmel was born Thomas Aloysius Henessey. He entered the Jesuits at Paris in 1700 and was professed of four vows in 1706, from which short course we gather that he must have had all his studies complete, or even been ordained before entry.

He came to Clonmel in 1712 prepared as he said himself “to undergo every danger”. The anticipation was fulfilled, for during the 40 years he ministered in Clonmel, he had more than once to ho into hiding, and at any time was liable to the penalties of high treason.

Havinf ventured to give Benediction in a cope, a priest hunter reported that a Popish bishop, who had conducted himself as a cardinal, had arrived in Clonmel. Dublin Castle issued orders for the arrest of the Cardinal, but the local authorities, who knew Fr Henessey, and connived at his ministrations, took no steps. To evade identification he passed under the nam Aloysius Quades in Jesuit correspondence. In the local records of Clonmel for the year 1727 we read “the lease of the Masshouse was renewed by the Corporation”.

Two years later Fr Henessey was made Superior of the Mission, and under his able administration, it rew to twice its size in numbers.

He died in Clonmel on April 14th 1752. In his will, dated November 28th 1751, he desires his burial to be the most frugal, and he bequeaths £10 each to his brother William and his sisters Mary and Catherine. Mr James Henessey is named as executor and heir to the residue, while Nicholas Baron is one of the witnesses. Both of these men were his fellow Jesuits in Clonmel at the time.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
HENNESSY, THOMAS. I find in a letter of F. Walter Lavallin, dated from Poitiers, the 1st of January, 1713, that F. Thomas Hennessy had sailed for Ireland “paratus ad omnia pericula subeunda”.

Hughes, Hugo, 1627-1705, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1464
  • Person
  • 17 January 1627-19 August 1705

Born: 17 January 1627, Athlone, County Westmeath
Entered: 31 December 1648, Lisbon, Portugal - Lusitaniae Province (LUS)
Ordained: 1654, Évora, Portugal
Final Vows: 02 February 1665, London, England
Died: 19 August 1705, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Lusitaniae Province (LUS)

Alias Hugo Hues; Hugo Cullen

Confessor to Queen of England, Catherine of Braganza, for 27 years

“Colan” - called “Cullenam” by Fr Knowles; signs himself as “Colano”; also separate entry has “Hugo Colano alias Hues” as he signs himself in a letter from Paris 13 November 1682
1651 In Philosophy teacher of Mathematics at Lisbon for 4 years
1655 Teacher of Mathematics at Elvas College Lisbon for 4 years
1661 at Évora College
1685 Returned to Ireland from Paris
1690-1696 at Irish College Poitiers and 1697-1703, then Procurator there 1703-1705
RIP Poitiers 19/08/1705 or 1704

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Confused two Entries (1) Heys or Hayes and (2) Hughes or Hues
(1) Heys or Hayes (cf below)
DOB c 1626 Ireland; Ent c 1647;
This Irish Jesuit is described by Father Conn in 1669 as “capellano effectivo della Regina e missionario legittimo” (Battersby “Jesuits” p 79)
Perhaps he is the same as Father Hughes of Hugo Colan
(2) Hughes or Hues
DOB Ireland; Ent c 1671; RIP 19/08/1709 Poitiers (in pencil)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Began his studies (in Portugal?) before Ent at Lisbon 31 December 1648
After First Vows he seems to have made all his studies at Évora and was Ordained there by 1654
He taught Mathematics at Elvas - though his Superiors thought he was better suited to literary subjects.
1661/2 Sent to London and made Final Vows there 02 February 1665
1671 He was Chaplain to Queen Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II and a Court Preacher in England. There he received from here some generous donations for a new Irish College or Novitiate at Athlone, but this money was actually used to found the new Irish College at Poitiers, until the Athlone project could be realised. This Athlone project never got off the ground, even though the thinking was that it could be disestablished in France and moved to Athlone..
During the Titus Oates Plot Cullen was a refugee in France and was acting as Procurator of the Irish Mission. Afterwards he returned to London and was again Chaplain to Queen Catherine. He was later envoy-extraordinary of James II to the court of Lisbon in order to solicit help from Portugal against William of Orange. This mission proved fruitless. He then came to Saint-Germain-en-Laye in service of the exiled James II, and he lived there until at least 1693.
1693 Took up residence as Procurator at the Irish College Poitiers, which he had done so much to found, and he died there 19/08/1705.
In his lifetime he was acknowledged by the General as “bene meritus” of the Society
Though the Athlone project was never realised, at the Suppression of the Society, some considerable part of the foundation was rescued in time by a Scots Jesuit - Crookshank - from a Paris bank. This money later formed part of the purchase money of the Restored Society’s first house in Ireland, Clongowes Wood College.
It is impossible to decide if his name was various spellings of “Cullen” or “Hughes” (his father’s surname and which his mother’s?). This difficulty similarly arises with others such as “D’Arcy/Bermingham” and “Thaly/Johnston”

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father John Hughes 1630-1705
At Poitiers on August 30th 1705 died Fr John Hughes, who may be regarded as the founder of the fortunes of the resuscitated Society in Ireland. He was Chaplain to Catherine of Braganza, Consort of Charles II of England. Through this connection, he came into the possession of a vast sum of money, which he placed at the disposal of Fr General for the use of the Irish Mission.

In particular he wished to found a house of Ours at Athlone, a fact which leads us to suspect that he was born there in 1630. This house was to be a College with a noviceship attached, revenues being sufficient to support a College and 24 novices. A foundation of sorts was made, which lasted only a short while with five of our Fathers. The bulk of the money was used to found our House at Poitiers. What was left formed the nest=egg which our Fathers so wisely invested at the Suppression, and which was afterwards used to purchase Castle Brown. Clongowes.

Fr Hughes, whose name is found in Jesuit letters under various aliases - Hugh Collins; Hugh Cullenan or Colan – resided for 30 years in London, as he hmiself states in a letter dated 1st May 1684.

When he died at Poitiers in 1705, Fr Knowles referred to him as “insignis et praecipus huius missionis benefactor”.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CULLENAN, HUGH. This Rev, Father was a Chaplain to Catharine, Queen of Charles II. and was mainly instrumental by his influence with her Majesty in procuring a splendid sum towards the erection of the Seminary at Poitiers. For 30 years, as I find by his letter of the 1st of May, 1684, he had resided in London. He was so successful in collecting funds for that establishment as justly to merit the title as its second founder. To the Irish Mission also he proved a generous friend. The year of his death I cannot fix; but F. Knoles, in his letter of the 6th of April, 1714, enumerating , the Fathers who died in exile “tempore bellorum” mentions F. Hugh Cullenan “insignis et praecipuus hujus Missionis Benefactor”.

Kelly, Ignatius Daniel, 1679-1743, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1511
  • Person
  • 1679-03 October 1743

Born: 1679, Dungarvan, County Waterford
Entered: 17 November 1698, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: 1707, Valladolid, Spain
Final Vows: 02 February 1716
Died: 03 October 1743, Dungarvan, County Waterford

Alias Roche
Mission Vice-Superior 14 August 1727-1773

Entries in old books show that he belonged to :
1723 New Ross Residence
1723-1726 Waterford Residence
1737 Named Rector of Poitiers
His will made in 1743 names him as PP of St Patrick and St Olav Waterford (Thrifts Irish Wills VOL III p 75)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1727 Appointed Mission Superior - as appears by a letter of his to John Harrison 13 June 1727
1729 Sent to Irish College Poitiers by General Tamburini
1733-1734 He was sent to Salamanca (Irish Ecclesiastical Record)
1743 At the Waterford Residence

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John Daniel Kelly and Helena née Roche
1700-1707 After First Vows he studied Philosophy and Theology at St Ambrose, Valladolid where he was Ordained 1707
1707-1711 Teaching Humanities at Valladolid
1711-1714 Chair of Philosophy at Bilbao
1714-1715 Tertianship
1715-1718 He was sent back to his Chair of Philosophy at Bilbao
1718-1721 Chair of Theology at Coruña
1721 Sent to Ireland and Waterford Residence and was appointed (15 September 1725) Secretary and Assistant with right of succession to the Mission Superior Anthony Knoles
1727 On the death of Knoles (14 August 1727) he became Vice-Superior of the Irish Mission, and held this Office until 1773. By his prudent government he kept his subjects free from participation in the disputes then rife amongst Catholics. He received many applications to establish houses of the Society in places with old-time Jesuit associations but by reason of the lack of Jesuits he could not accede to the requests from Limerick and Galway. In the end he was able to open the Galway Residence.
At the request of the bishops in Ireland assembled at Dublin he was able to bring influence from abroad to prevent the renewal of religious persecution. While on Visitation as Mission Superior to the Irish Colleges on the Continent, he was able to bring their perilous financial situation to the attention of the General, and thanks to his painstaking work, his successor was able to bring financial negotiations to a successful conclusion.
He was very popular with the clergy and people of Waterford who prevented his return to Spain when he had been named rector of the Irish College, Salamanca.
He died as a result of an accident returning from a sick call 03 October 1743 Dungarvan

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962

Ignatius Kelly alias Roche (1727-1733)

Ignatius Daniel Kelly, generally known in Spain and Ireland as Ignatius Roche, was the son of John Daniel Kelly, of Dungarvan, and Helena Roche. He was born at Dungarvan on or about 15th June, 1679, and entered the Society at Villagarcia in Castile on 17th November, 1698. He studied philosophy for three years, and did a four years' course of theology in the College of St Ambrose at, Valladolid, ending in 1707; after which he taught grammar for three years, and acted as Minister for one. From 1711 to 1714 he was Professor of Philosophy at Bilbao, and after an interruption of a year of third probation, he resumed his Chair of Philosophy at Bilbao for another three years, during which he made his solemn profession of four vows on 7th February, 1716. Then, after teaching theology at Coruna for two years (1718-20), he returned to Ireland early in 1721, and was stationed at Waterford. Having been appointed Secretary and Assistant to Fr Knoles, with right of succession (15th September, 1725), he became Vice-Superior of the Mission when Fr Knoles died on 14th August, 1727, and continued as such till 1733. By his prudent counsels he kept the Society free from participation in the internecine disputes then rife among Catholics. He received many applications from various places to establish Residences of the Society, but the fewness of subjects prevented compliance. The Residence of Galway, however, was re-opened in the summer of 1731, the bishops of Ireland, assembled in Dublin, requested him to use his influence abroad to thwart the hopes of the heretics, which he did with such success that the danger was averted. In 1631-32* he made a Visitation of the Irish College of Poitiers to settle the confused financial relations between it and the Irish Mission. He appealed often to be relieved of the government of the Mission, but his petitions were not heard until 1733. His end was in keeping with his life. He met with an accident on his way back from a sick call to a poor woman, and died soon after at Waterford on 1st October, 1743.

*Addendum for 1631-32 read 1731-32

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Ignatius Kelly 1679-1743
Ignatius Kelly, generally known in Spain and Ireland as Ignatius Roche, was born in Dungarvan in 1679. As was usual in those days, he did all his studies in Spain, where he was received into the Society in 1698. He was Professor of Theology in Bilbao and Corunna.

Having returned to Ireland he was stationed at Waterford. He acted as Socius to Fr Knoles and became Vice-Superior on his death. The following extract from a letter of his to Fr John Harrison, Santiago, 13th June 1727, will give an idea of the conditions of the time, and the various devices used in correspondence to conceal identities :
“I have written to you several times asking for news of your health, which may the Lord preserve to you for many years. Here we are few and frail. Mr Knoles is incapable of doing anything unless suffer. Senor Tamburini has relieved him of the charge of this poor Mission, and has placed it on my shoulders, and I assure you I am tired of it.I am sorry that I cannot give you a formal Patent to Dom Andrew Lynch, who will be the bearer of this. His parents are very respectable, and his parents have the necessary qualities to become an apprentice in your factory”.
In spite of the poor account that Fr Kelly gave of the state of the Mission, he was able to reopen the Galway Residence in 1729.

In 1733 he was relieved of office, and spent the next ten years in the ministry. He was Parish Priest of St Patrick’s Waterford from 1734-1742, and died on October 1st 1743, as a result of an accident occurred while returning from a sick call.

Kelly, James, 1712-1762, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1513
  • Person
  • 01 May 1712-13 January 1762

Born: 01 May 1712, Ireland or France
Entered: 11 October 1732, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 21 December 1744, Bordeaux, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1749
Died: 13 January 1762, Unknown

Distinguished talent - aptitude for all the sciences. Judgement and prudence beyond his years
1734-1739 Taught Grammar, Rhetoric, Humanities at Bordeaux College
1740 At La Rochelle College teaching
1743 At Bordeaux College taught Rhetoric, Humanities
1749-1761 At Poitiers teaching Rhetoric, Humanities - Talent and proficiency far above the average. Vice-Rector in 1762 at time of suppression

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1755 Professor of Rhetoric at Grand Collège Poitiers. He was also Vice-rector of the Seminary and of the Irish College. (cf Arrêt de la Cour du Parlement de Paris, 1763).
On 11 December 1755 he delivered an address with the view of proving that “To admit all prejudices is an excess of weakness; to reject them all is an excess of rashness” (Mercure de France, April 1756, Vil i, pp 118-120)
1762 Vice-Rector at Irish College Poitiers.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
The fact that his name is never considered in correspondence for the Irish Mission, suggests that he was born or brought up in France of Irish parents but spoke neither English nor Irish.
1734-1736 After First Vows he was sent for Regency to Angoulême
1736-1738 He was then sent to Bordeaux for Philosophy studies, and received Minor Orders there 06 April 1737.
1738-1742 Sent to La Rochelle for further Regency
1742-1746 He was then sent to Bordeaux again for Theology where he was Ordained 1745
The next three years are a little unclear, but at the end of formation he was sent to Grand Collège Poitiers where initially he taught Rhetoric, but later Philosophy and Theology. He was still at Poitiers on the eve of the dissolution of the Society in France. With other Jesuit professors of the Grand Collège Poitiers he was accused by the Gallican and Jansenists on the faculty of Poitiers University of teaching false doctrines. On the death of Stephen Ussher the last Rector, he was briefly appointed Superior before the confiscation.
His name disappears from CATS after 01 February 1762
To judge from the estimates of his character and ability to be found in contemporary catalogi, James Kelly was a highly talented man with extraordinary intellectual ability.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
KELLY, JAMES. I meet with him as Superior of his brethren in Ireland on the 2nd of October, 1684. He was then residing in Dublin. In the years 1697, 1698, 1699, he occurs Rector of the Seminary at Poitiers. In a letter of the 6th of April, 1714, it is stated in general terms that he had died abroad some time before, “indefcssus in Vinca laborator”.

Kirwan, Dominic, 1632-1710, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1543
  • Person
  • 25 September 1632-19 September 1710

Born: 25 September 1632, County Galway
Entered: 16 October 1652, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1663, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 11 June 1672
Died: 19 September 1710, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Parents Edmund and Anastasia Blake
Studied Humanities at Galway for 5 years then sent by parents to study in Belgium - 2 years at Antwerp under the Jesuits
1663 At Limerick on Tertianship
1666 Catalogue At Galway, Catechist, administering Sacraments on the Mission a year or longer
1700 At La Flèche College
1705 Went to Ireland
1705-1710 At Irish College Poitiers Operarius and teaching Grammar (1708 in Ireland again)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Edmund Kieran and Anastasia née Blake
Early Education at Galway and Humanities at Antwerp
1633 A Tertian at Limerick in December
1644 Came from Belgium to Ireland in July (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
1666 Living in Galway and had been a Missioner there for up to a year (HIB CAT BREV - ARSI)
1699 and 1708 At Poitiers in exile, and had been invited to La Flèche, where he probably died before April 1674
Described as “a distinguished Missioner” (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Edmund (benefactor of the Society) and Anastatia née Burke
After First Vows he was sent to Antwerp for Philosophy and spent Regency successively at Oudenaarde and Ypres.
1659-1663 He was then sent to Louvain for Theology and was Ordained there in 1663
1663-1664 Tertianship at Lierre (Lier)
1664 Sent to Ireland and to Galway as an Operarius and Catechist. He remained there until the Williamite war when he moved to the Dublin Residence.
1698-1706 He was deported and found refuge at La Flèche College as a Missioner
1706 Sent to Irish College Poitiers where he died 19 September 1710

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
KIERAN, or KIRWAN, DOMINICK, was making his third year of Probation at Limerick in Dec. 1633, and was recommended as successor to F. Maurice Ward, who had died at Galway on the 2nd of the preceding month. After the Revolution he retired to Poitiers, and was courteously invited by the French Fathers to sojourn at La Fleche, where, I think he ended his days. This venerable man certainly died before April of the year 1714, as I find by F. Anthony Knoles letter of that date, who stiles him “praestans operarius”.

Lacy, Thomas, d 1707, Jesuit scholastic

  • IE IJA J/1551
  • Person
  • d 05 December 1707

Entered: Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Died: 05 December 1705, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Lavallin, Walter, 1655-1726, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1556
  • Person
  • 24 November 1655-13 January 1726

Born: 24 November 1655, County Cork
Entered: 05 September 1675, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 1686, La Flèche, France
Final Vows: 15 August 1691, Rouen
Died: 13 January 1726, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1685 At La Flèche teaching Humanities and Rhetoric
1690 Gone to Ireland for 3 years
1693 At Quimper College teaching Grammar, Rhetoric, Philosophy
1696 At Brest. MA in University of Nantes. Teaching Philosophy.
1705 At Blois College teaching Grammar, Philosophy. Spiritual Father, Minister and Procurator 4 years
1709-1720 At Irish College Poitiers. Rector 1718-1710
1724-1725 Infirmus

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1717 Rector at Poitiers
Said to have been a learned man; Professor of Philosophy; Of pleasing address; He had been on the Irish Mission (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had previously studied at Nantes graduating MA before Ent 05 September 1675 Paris
After First Vows he was sent to Hesdin for Regency, and then to La Flèche for Theology where he was Ordained 1686
1687-1691 Sent to Ireland, but four years later was deported to France
1691-1695 Sent to Quimper and holding a Chair in Philosophy
1695-1696 Missioner at Brest where he was also chaplain to the French navy in the Mediterranean for a year.
1696-1709 Sent to Blois College as Minister and Procurator
1709 Rector of Irish College Poitiers for two terms 1709-1717 and 1722-1724. he died there 13 January 1726

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Walter Lavallin 1655-1726
Fr Walter Lavallin a native of Ireland, was appointed Rector of the Irish College at Poitiers in 1709. He was still Rector in 1714, when he wrote to the Superior that he had erected a new public chapel for the use of the College, that the expense had exceeded his expectations, but that hen would not contract any debt that he was not able to discharge.

He died at Poitiers on the 10th or 13th of January 1726.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LAVALLIN, WALTER, was certainly appointed Rector of the Seminary at Poitiers in 1709. He was still filling the same office on the 6th of September, 1714, when he addressed a letter to his Superior, acquainting him of his having erected a new public Chapel for the use of the College; and that the expenses had exceeded his original calculation, but that he had not contracted, nor would contract, any debt, which he was not able to discharge.

Lavery, Charles, 1670-1725, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1557
  • Person
  • 1670-07 August 1725

Born: 1670, Magheralin, County Down
Entered: 06 January 1698, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1697, Rome - pre Entry
Final Vows: 02 February 1709
Died: 07 August 1725, Dublin - Romanae Province (ROM)

Completed his studies before Ent
1700 At Bordeaux College teaching Grammar
1705 At Xaintes (Saintes) College (AQUIT) teaching Humanities and Philosophy and studying Philosophy and Theology
1706-1708 At Poitiers
1714-1717 At Poitiers Spiritual Father
1717 CAT Good talent, learned and speaks elegantly. It is wished he had greater love of poverty. When on Mission people complained he was irascible and wanting in meekness and humility

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Patrick and Mary of Ulster. Probably a brother of Susan Lavery OSB, a nun, of Dunkirk (Foley’s Collectanea Vol vi p 439)
He was one of James II Demies sent to Magdalen College, Oxford, 1687
Entered the English College Rome for Higher Studies 30 March 1689.
Professor of Philosophy; Eloquent Preacher; Charming in conversation
1708 and 1714 In Ireland (HIB Catalogues)
1717 At Poitiers

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Irish College Rome and was already a Priest 1697 Rome, before Ent 06 January 1698 Bordeaux
1700-1707 After First Vows he taught Humanities at Bordeaux, Nantes and Poitiers
1707-1714 Sent to Ireland and Dublin and worked in the Dublin district.
1714-1717 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Spiritual Father
1717 Sent to Dublin and worked as an Assistant Priest until his death there 07 August 1725

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Charles Lavery SJ 1670-1717
Fr Charles Lavery was born at Magheralin County Down in 1670. He entered Magdalen College Oxford, as one of James II demie or foundationers At this time great efforts were being made to obtain for the Fathers a firm footing in the University. Although both Christ Church and University College were governed by Catholics, the chief hope was placed in Magdalen, which had been given by the King to his Catholic subjects. In 1688 however, all fifteen demies at the College were expelled. Charles Lavery first went to Rome and entered the English College. He returned to Ireland without taking orders, and he entered the Society in 1697.

He was appointed Professor of Philosophy. In addition, he was an eloquent preacher and a gifted conversationalist. His name is found as having been in Ireland in 1708 and 1714.

He died in Poitiers in 1717.

Lenan, Patrick, 1561-1621, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1568
  • Person
  • 1561-06 September 1621

Born: 1561, Drogheda, County Louth
Entered: 10 November 1596, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: pre Entry
Professed: 1617
Died: 06 September 1621, Dublin Residence, Dublin

Studied Theology before Ent. BA An Oxford graduate, MA of Douai and BD of Louvain. For 6 years a student of Stapleton and Lessius
1600 Not in Catalogue
1616 Catalogue On Irish Mission 14 years Age 60 Soc 17. Consultor on Mission. Strong in health, preacher, talented and zealous, pleasing address. Fit to be Superior. Of a choleric nature. Gifted as a Missioner “in perpetual motion”, a reconciler of enemies.
1617 Age 63 Soc 20. In Ireland
1621 At Poitiers, confined to bed by sickness
1622 In Leinster, Consultor of Mission. Suffering from Apoplexy.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronolgica” :
He was a missioner in Leinster and is mentioned in a letter of Thomas Lawndry (vere Christopher Holywood) to the General, November 1611, and printed in the Irish Ecclesiastical Record April 1874.
The Royal Commissioners in 1615 state :Lennon, a famous Priest, is kept by Nicholas Netterville” (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
He was an accomplished Theologian and Missioner “in perpetual motion”, the great reconciler of enemies.
He was a graduate of Oxford; MA Douai; BD Louvain; for six years a pupil of Stapleton and Lessius - a gifted solid man. (cf Holiwood and Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Studied Humanities at Oxford. Graduated MA at Douai and BD at Louvain, and was already Ordained on Ent 10 November 1596 Rome
1598-1600 After First Vows he studied at the German College
1600 Sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence and his work was limited to the city due to his lack of Irish language.
1606 Superior of Dublin Residence, succeeding Richard Field, until his death in office there 06 September 1621

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Patrick Lenan SJ 1561-1621
In Drogheda in 1554/5 was born Father Patrick Lenan. He was an accomplished scholar and theologian, a graduate of Oxford, an MA of Douai, BD od Louvain. He was for 6 years a pupil of Dr Stapleton, the great English controversialist, and also had Leonard Lessius as his Professor. He became a Jesuit in 1597, returning to Ireland in 1601.

His work lay mostly in the Pale and in Dublin, where together with Henry Fitzsimon and Barnaby O’Kearney, he was engaged in educating the youth of Dublin.

The Superior Fr Holywood referred to him as a very mature and reliable man and appointed him his Socius. The Royal Commission or Visitation of Dublin, charges Sir Nicholas Netterville as privately harbouring Lenan, a famous popish priest, and others in 1615.

A Proclamation of October 18th 1617 banished all priests from the country and Father Lenan was forced to leave. His subsequent history is unknown, but he died about 1621.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LENAN, PATRICK. With regret I am obliged to confess that I can barely state of this worthy Jesuit, that I find him actively employed in Leinster, in February, 1603, and in February, 1605. I believe he is the person thus reported by the Royal Commissioners in 1615, “Lennon, a famous Priest is kept by Nicholas Neterville”.

Lery, Thomas, 1624-1691, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1574
  • Person
  • 25 March 1624-28 September 1691

Born: 25 March 1624, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 05 August 1649, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: c 1651,
Final Vows: 15 August 1666
Died: 28 September 1691, Limerick

1651 Scholastic at Arévalo Spain (near Avila)
1651 ANG Catalogue Was at Salamanca in 4th year Theology, was a priest before Ent, suitable for rectorship in Irish Seminary in Spain
1655 At Pontevedao College (CAST) teaching Grammar (B)
1666 ROM Catalogue At Cashel : Restored the BV Sodality, preaches, administers Sacs and 5 years PP. Gives satisfaction ro “U Geul”, after whose death he devotes himself to affairs of the Irish Mission. Was 7 years on the Mission (D)
1678 At Poitiers Minister and teaching Humanities

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1657 Came to Irish Mission and worked from Waterford and Cashel Residences. When Andrew FitzBennet Sall was committed to prison in Waterford, 22/01/1658, Thomas Leary supplied for him in the town and country.
1669 He was in Cashel, and witnessed the miraculous cure of his niece, Elizabeth Xavieria Leri, of Cashel, who was cured by a Novena to Francis Xavier (cf Morris’s Louvain “Excerpts”; Foley’s Collectanea and Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John and Isabel née Young
Had studied Philosophy at Santiago and two years Theology Salamanca before Ent 05 August 1649 Villagarcía
1651-1652 After First Vows he was Ordained and sent on Regency to Arévalo
1652-1658 He then continued studies at Salamanca followed by a period teaching Humanities at Pontevedra
1658 Sent to Ireland and initially probably at Cashel. For a while he replaced Andrew Fitzbennet Sall at Waterford when he had been captured, and deported. After restoration he was sent to Cashel where he ministered at Catechising, Preaching and administering the Sacraments and where he also restored the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin
1674 Appointed Consultor of the Mission and sent to Dublin.
1677 Sent to conduct business for the Mission Superior at Poitiers, investigating complaints brought against the Rector Ignatius Browne. Though it was intended that he return immediately, he was kept in France until the end of the Titus Oates Plot
1680 He returned to Cashel where he remained until the arrival of William's army. He then withdrew to Limerick and died there 28 September 1691

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LEARY, THOMAS, arrived in Ireland during the latter end of 1657, and “was stationed at Waterford”. When F. Andrew Sall, (of whom we have made mention in a note to the article on Ignatius Brown), was apprehended in that city on the 22nd of January following, and thrown into jail, F. Leary supplied his place in town and country with great spirit and success. In 1669 I meet him at Cashell, where he witnessed the remarkable cure of his niece, Elizabeth Xaverira Leary, of dysentery and deafness, after performing a Novena in honour of St. Francis Xavier. The fact was certified by the grand Vicar of Cashell, as F. Stephen Rice reports it in the Annual letters. After this event I lose sight of him.

Lincol, Andrew, 1623-1686, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1578
  • Person
  • 30 November 1623-14 February 1686

Born: 30 November 1623, County Waterford
Entered: 25 June 1642 - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: c 1652, St Ambrose Valladolid, Spain
Final Vow: 02 February 1660
Died: 14 February 1686, Irish College, Salamanca, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)

1645 At Pamplona teaching Humanities
1651 ANG Catalogue declared fit to be Superior in Irish Seminary
1655 At Bilbao College teaching Grammar - very high talent, a taste for letters
1665-1685 Rector Irish College Salamanca Teaching Philosophy

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Later than 1634 he was studying with John Clare and Andrew Fitzbennet Sall in CAST.
1665-1689 Rector at Salamanca (Irish Ecclesiastical Record August 1874, and Hogan’s List)
Note from Andrew Lynch Entry :
1672 Rector at Santiago, between whom and Father Andrew Lincol, Rector of Salamanca, Father Patrick Lynch was arbitrator in the case of Nicholas’ Wise’s will in 1672

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
After First Vows he spent a short Regency at Pamplona and then was sent for studies at Royal College Salamanca and St Ambrose Valladolid, where he was Ordained c 1652
1655-1656 At Bilbao
1656+1658 Sent to Santiago to teach Philosophy
1658-1666 Rector of Irish College Poitiers
1666 Rector of Irish College Salamanca until his death there 14 February 1686

Long, Dermot, 1679-1736, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1591
  • Person
  • 07 June 1679-26 February 1736

Born: 07 June 1679, County Cork
Entered: 29 August 1701, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 1712, Paris, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1717 Arras
Died: 26 February 1736, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Franciae Province (FRA)

1714 At College of Eu (FRA) Taught Humanities and Rhetoric
1717-1733 At Arras Collège teaching Rhetoric, Minister - good in all
1734-1735 Minister and Procurator at Poitiers
1733-1736 Rector of Irish College Poitiers succeeded on death by Bernard Routh

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already studied Philosophy in France before Ent 29 August 1701 Paris
1703-1709 After First Vows sent on Regency at Vannes and Paris
1709-1712 Completed studies in Paris and was Ordained there 1712
1712-1715 He then taught Humanities for brief periods at Auch and Arras
1715-1716 Made Tertianship
1715 Sent as Minister to Arras and later Procurator, but mostly he was Operarius and Sodality Director for 16 years
1732 Rector of Irish College Poitiers 14 November 1732, and died in Office 26 February 1736

Lynch, Marcus, 1651-1727, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1604
  • Person
  • 25 April 1651-21 April 1727

Born: 25 April 1651, County Galway
Entered: 29 October 1673, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: 1681, Valladolid, Spain
Final Vows: 29 September 1689
Died: 21 April 1727, Irish College, Poitiers, France

1675 at Villagarcía Age 24 has made much progress
1678 At Salamanca
1704-1705 Went from Paris to Ireland
1705 At La Flèche (FRA) teaching Humanities and Rhetoric, on Mission 14 years
Rector of Poitiers 1705 & perhaps 1710

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1672 In Salamanca (Dr McDonald’s letter to Hogan)
1717 At Poitiers
Professor of Philosophy; Twice Rector of Poitiers 1708 and before;
Father Knoles, Mission Superior, describes him as a learned and holy man . Fr Knoles, when in prison placed him in charge of the Mission, in case he was executes (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of James and Milina néé Blake
Had completed his Philosophy at Santiago, and then 18/10/1673 began Theology at Irish College Salamanca before Ent 29 October 1673 Villagarcía
After First Vows he was sent on two years of Regency, and then sent to Royal College Salamanca for Theology which he finished at St Ambrose College, Valladolid and was Ordained there by 1681.
1681-1687 Taught Humanities at Soria
1687/8 Sent to Ireland and Galway until it fell to the Williamite army
1694-1699 Was working in Dublin but had to leave four years later to go into exile. (He was appointed Consultor of the Mission 1691.) In 1696 the Mission Superior wrote to the General saying that in case he was imprisoned, he wold be entrusting the Mission to Marcus Lynch. In fact the Mission Superior escaped arrest, and it was Marcus who was arrested and deported.
1699-1704 He found refuge at La Flèche College
1704-1709 Rector Irish College Poitiers. He remained there after office doing various jobs until he died 10 November 1726
He had spent time as a Consultor and Vice-Superior of the Irish Mission

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LYNCH, MARK. In a letter of F. Anthony Knoles, written 26th Dec. 1696, from Waterford he says, “if anything untoward should happen to me, I will consign our affairs to the charge of F. Mark Lynch; for he is learned and prudent, and tenacious of religious discipline”. F. Lynch, however, was himself sent into banishment within two years. Repairing to the Seminary at Poitiers, he was invited by the French Jesuits to take up his abode in the Royal College at La Fleche. He had been Rector of the seminary at Poitiers, as I discover by a letter of the 31st of March, 1712, when he was recommended as a fit person to govern it a second time.

MacEgan, Florence, 1719-1781, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1626
  • Person
  • 24 April 1719-07 December 1781

Born: 24 April 1719, Ireland or Carcassonne, France
Entered: 24 October 1737, Naples, Italy - Neapolitanae Province (NAP)
Ordained: c 1748, Rome, Italy
Final Vows: 02 February 1755
Died: 07 December 1781, Rome, Italy - Neapolitanae Province (NAP)

1740 College Maximo Naples
1743 At College Theatino (Chieti) NAP - good talent but a fiery temper
1754 At Barletta College, now a Missioner
1758 Not in NAP Catalogue
1757-1758 AT Bordeaux College
1761 At Chieti College teaching Mathematics and preaching - has very good talent. Minister, Concionator, Lector, Missionarius
1767 Expelled from Benevento into the Roman States with 600 Neapolitan Jesuits
1775 Is still alive

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Four Entries : Joseph Malgan (1&2); Florence McEgan (2&3)
(1&2) Joseph Malgan
Died in Rome the same day and is probably identical with Florence McEgan (cf John Thorpe’s letter in Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
(3&4) Florence McEgan
Had been a Captain in the Neapolitan army and had a distinguished bearing before Ent
Rector of Benevento College at the Suppression.
He was reputed and excellent Preacher (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS and Hogan’s List)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
All Catalogue entries described Florence as Irish, except the NAP one which suggested that he had been borne at Carcassone, in France. It is certainly true that he had been educated in France
After First Vows sent for studies in Rhetoric and Philosophy at Naples and then Regency at Chieti
1745 He was sent to Naples for Theology. At the end of his first year he was transferred to Rome and continued his Theology studies and the Roman College and he was Ordained there c 1748.
1749-1750 After completing his studies he was sent to the Professed House in Rome as a Secretary to the French Assistancy
1750-1754 He was sent back to Naples, taught Humanities for two years and then sent to Barletta on Mission work.
1755-1758 Sent teaching to AQUIT, including two years teaching at the Irish College Poitiers.
1758 Sent to Bordeaux as Minister.
1760 Back in NAP he was a Missionary in Chieti and Barletta.
Little is known about his life after the Suppression, and he was in Terracina on the eve of that Suppression, when he wrote in French to some priest colleagues 29 April 1772 of the trials they were dealing with. According to later authorities he died in Rome 07 December 1781

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MAC-EGAN, FLORENCE, was born on the 4th of April, 1719, and was admitted into the Order of the Province of Naples, on the 24th of October, 1737. He was raised to the rank of a Professed Father, on the 2nd of February, 1755, and died at Rome, on the 7th of December, 1781. He had the reputation of being an excellent preacher. See p. 60 of the Second Supplement Bibliothecae Scriptorum Soc. Jesu, Romae. 1816.

MALGAN, JOSEPH. This Irish Father, as I find in a letter of F. Thorpe, died suddenly at Rome, on the 7th of December, 1781; but I can glean no further particulars, and am almost inclined to suspect that this is the same person as F. Mac-Egan.

Manby, John, 1675-1749, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1668
  • Person
  • 01 August 1675-04 October 1749

Born: 01 August 1675, County Derry
Entered: 06 December 1690, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1703, Poitiers, France
Final Vows 1711
Died: 04 October 1749, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Was older brother of Peter Manby - RIP 1752

“Was brother of Peter Manby SJ and a far superior man”
First Vows at Pau 07 December 1692
1694 At Pau College AQUIT studying Logic
1695 At Périgord teaching Grammar
1698 At Tulles College teaching Humanities
1699 James (recte John) At Fontenoy teaching Rhetoric
1700-1723 At Poitiers teaching Humanities, Rhetoric. Subtle intellect, fit to teach Sciences. Acute cultivated mind. Taught at “Magno” College” too
1723 At Bordeaux College teaching Humanities
1730 At Poitiers Infirmus
“John Maachy” (recte John Manby?) 04 October 1749

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Peter (Dean of Derry an afterwards received into the Church). Older brother of Peter
1692-1694 After First Vows he studied Philosophy at Pau
1694-1699 He was sent for Regency at Périgueux, Tulle and Fontenoy, before continuing Philosophy and then studying Theology, both at Grand Collège Poitiers, where he was Ordained
1703 He was sent to teach Humanities at Poitiers, except for two years at La Rochelle.
He died at Poitiers between 1746 and 1749

Manby, Peter, 1691-1752, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1669
  • Person
  • 01 January 1681-15 January 1752

Born: 01 January 1681, County Derry
Entered: 18 August 1703, Lisbon, Portugal - Lusitaniae Province (LUS)
Ordained: 1712/3, Coimbra, Portugal
Died: 15 January 1752, Clonmel, County Tipperary

Was younger brother of John Manby - RIP 1748

Studied in Soc Philosophy and Theology
1717 Catalogue Approved Scholastic came to Mission 3 months ago and in the country with a private family. I have not been able to get to him and there are no socii near him who could give information. Came here from Portugal and their Catalogue will give necessary info
1732 At Poitiers operarius
“The Considerations” by Peter Manby said to be at Clongowes

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Dean, and grandson of Colonel Manby (Harris “Irish Writers”) Younger brother of John.
Imprisoned for the faith before Entry.
Writer; Studied at Coimbra (Franco “Annales Lusitaniae”)
1717 On Irish Mission (HIB Catalogue 1717)
Third Entry : No Ch Name Manby
DOB Leinster; Ent 1703.
Brother of Peter (Harris)
(This seems to be the same Entry, and perhaps should read brother of John??)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Peter (Dean of Derry an afterwards received into the Church). Younger brother of John Manby
After First Vows he studied at Coimbra where he was Ordained 1712/13
1716 Sent to Ireland. He lived near Dublin at the house of a nobleman, exercising the ministries of Chaplain, Schoolmaster and assistant Priest for the local clergy. He worked later at the Dublin Jesuit school before he returned to Poitiers in 1730
1730-1733 Minister of Irish College Poitiers
1733 Sent back to Ireland. For a time he was tutor to the family of Lord Dunboyne, but then moved to Clonmel where he died 15 January 1752

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Peter Manby SJ 1681-1752
Peter Manby was born in Ireland in 1680, the son of a Protestant Clergyman, Robert Manby. His father however was converted himself and became a friar, his two sons, John and Peter, becoming Jesuits.
Peter was educated in Portugal and entered the Society in 1703. In 1714 he applied for the Irish Mission.
He published a book in Dublin in 1724 entitled “Remarks on Dr Lloyd’s Translation of the Montpelier Catechism”. His contention was that it was marred by Jansenism.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MANBY, PETER, was in Portugal in the spring of 1714, and had applied, as I find by F. Anthony Knoles’s letter, dated from Ross, the 6th of April, that year, to come over to serve the Irish Mission.

McGrath, John Xavier, 1702-1755, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1714
  • Person
  • 14 February 1702-25 November 1755

Born: 14 February 1702, Shanakill, Rathgormack, County Waterford
Entered: 12 November 1721, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: c 1732/3, Poitiers, France
Died: 25 November 1755, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1723-1727 Taught Grammar and Humanities (at Poitiers?)/ First Vows 17 November 1726
1727 At Tulles teaching Humanities
1729-1733 Studying Theology at Poitiers
1733-1734 Tertianship at Marans AQUIT
1735-1737 Teaching Philosophy at Fontenoy AQUIT
1738-1740 In Ireland
1740-1742 At Poitiers, Minister and teaching
1743 At Luçon N of Rochelle or Limoges
1744-1747 At Fontenoy College Minister
1752-1755 Superior of Cleracensis (Clavacensi) - Clarens, Switzerland

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
He had already studied Philosophy before Ent 12 November 1721 Bordeaux
After First Vows he was sent on Regency to Tulle, Agen, and Angoulême,
1729-1723 He was sent for Theology first for a year at Bordeaux and then to Grand Collège Poitiers where he was Ordained 1732/3
1733-1735 Tertianship at Marennes and then spent a year at Irish College Poitiers
1735-1737 Taught Philosophy at Fontenoy
1737-1739 Sent to Ireland and Limerick Residence
1739-1742 Sent to be Minister at Irish College Poitiers
1742-1751 Sent on various missions as Minister, Operarius and Missioner in various places of AQUIT
1751-1754 Rector of Irish College Poitiers 26 Ocotber 1751
1754 Sent to Bordeaux due to ill health, and he died there 25 November 1755

Moriarty, John Baptist, 1697-1732, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1768
  • Person
  • 31 January 1697-13 October 1732

Born: 31 January 1697, County Kerry
Entered: 27 November 1717, Toulouse, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)
Ordained: 1730, Poitiers, France
Died: 13 October 1732, County Kerry

First Vows at Sainflour Tolouse 28 November 1719
He taught Grammar and Humanities at the Toulouse Colleges for 3 years
1727-1730 Theology at Poitiers
1731 In Ireland where he died 13 October 1732

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1728 At Irish College Potiers in second year Divinity
There is a book of the Waterford Residence SJ with “Ex Libris Miss. Hiberniae SJ, Joannes Moriarty”

◆ Fr Francis Finegan Sj :
A nephew of Denis Moriarty Bishop of Kerry 1720-1738
1720-1722 After First Vows he was sent for Philosophy to Tournon.
1722-1727 He was then sent Regency at Pérpignan, Albi and Carcassone.
1727-1730 He was then sent to Grand Collège Poitiers in AQUIT for Theology and Ordained there 1730. His studies seems to have been somewhat hurried out of deference to his Bishop uncle, but it is possible also that he was in compromised health. With the permission of the General he returned to Ireland the year, of his Ordination and resided with his Bishop Uncle.
1731 A year later he returned to France with Ignatius Kelly then undertaking the Visitation of the Irish College, Poitiers, and he was appointed Minister there. A year later, his health was now in a precarious state. So, he was then sent back by the Rector at Poitiers to Ireland but he died as soon as he arrived in Kerry 13 October 1732

Morony, Joseph, 1714-1758, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1770
  • Person
  • 19 March 1714-15 July 1785, Dublin

Born: 19 March 1714, Ballykeefe, County Limerick
Entered: 03 September 1734, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1743, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 04 June 1752
Died: 15 July 1785, Dublin - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Taught Humanities 6 years
1736-1738 & 1740-1741 Taught Grammar
1738-1747 Prefect of Boarders, Teaching Rhetoric, Studying Theology at Irish College Poitiers - Minister 1745-1747
1755 At least from this date in Ireland
1761 In Ireland towards end of 1761 (notice sent by Fr Corcoran & notice on an old stone, on which IHS at Limerick and Morony family
“Wonder if 1739-1740 dates are correct as original MS has 1640-1641 & 1639-1640, and the writer is very orderly”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1746-1785 A Writer and a celebrated Preacher in Limerick, Cork, Waterford and Dublin
Taught Humanities, and was Procurator at Poitiers.
1746 & 1756 In Limerick
In his book, printed in 1796, he is said to have been “lately living in Dublin.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Bordeaux before Ent 03 September 1734 Bordeaux
1736-1739 After First Vows he was sent on Regency teaching to Tulle and as Prefect at the Irish College Poitiers.
1739-1741 Sent on two further years of Regency at Agen and Luçon
1741-1746 Sent for Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and he was Ordained there in 1743
1746-1747 Sent to Ireland and spent a year at Clonmel
1747-1773 Sent to Limerick where most of his working life was spent. At Limerick he proved himself not only a successful schoolmaster but enjoyed a high reputation as a Preacher throughout Munster. According to the census of 1766 he conducted his school at Jail Lane, near Athlunkard St.
1773 At the Suppression of the Society, 1773, he closed his school and went to live in Dublin. He was one of the signatories of 7 February, 1774, Accepting the brief of the Suppression. He died in Dublin 15 July 1785
Such was the esteem in which his memory was held as a preacher that eleven years after his death, two volumes of his sermons were published by the aid of the generous subscriptions of his many admirers

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Joseph Moroney SJ 1714-1785
Fr Joseph Moroney was born on March 19th 1714 at Ballykeefe, Mungret, Limerick. He joined the Jesuits at Bordeaux in 1734.

Twelve years later he was sent to Ireland, where he became famous as a preacher, in Limerick, Waterford and Munster in general, but mainly in Limerick. According to a census, he conducted a school at Gaol Lane, Limerick, but on the Suppression of the Society, the school ceased to function in 1783.

He published his sermons in two volumes. They are plain instructions without any evidence of great genius or eloquence, but then he is not the only great orator who reads rather poorly in print.

Fr Moroney ended his days in Dublin where he died in 1785.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note :
Joseph Morony
Those marked with * were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MORONY, JOSEPH,was born at Limerick, on the 19th of March 1714, and joined the Society at Bordeaux, on the 4th of September, 1734. Twelve years later he came to the Mission, and was placed in his native city. On the 28th of June, 1752, he was numbered with the Professed Fathers. F. Joseph Morony became celebrated as a Preacher in Limerick, Waterford, and several parts of the Province of Munster, and left 2 Vols. of discourses printed in Dublin 12mo, 1796. The 1st Vol. contains 260pp : the 2nd 309 pp. A good judge informs me they were solid instructions in a plain stile, but without any evidence of great genius or eloquence. 1 think he died in Dublin.

Born: 19 March 1714, Ballykeefe, County Limerick
Entered: 03 September 1734, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1743, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 04 June 1752
Died: 15 July 1785, Dublin - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Taught Humanities 6 years
1736-1738 & 1740-1741 Taught Grammar
1738-1747 Prefect of Boarders, Teaching Rhetoric, Studying Theology at Irish College Poitiers - Minister 1745-1747
1755 At least from this date in Ireland
1761 In Ireland towards end of 1761 (notice sent by Fr Corcoran & notice on an old stone, on which IHS at Limerick and Morony family
“Wonder if 1739-1740 dates are correct as original MS has 1640-1641 & 1639-1640, and the writer is very orderly”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1746-1785 A Writer and a celebrated Preacher in Limerick, Cork, Waterford and Dublin
Taught Humanities, and was Procurator at Poitiers.
1746 & 1756 In Limerick
In his book, printed in 1796, he is said to have been “lately living in Dublin.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Bordeaux before Ent 03 September 1734 Bordeaux
1736-1739 After First Vows he was sent on Regency teaching to Tulle and as Prefect at the Irish College Poitiers.
1739-1741 Sent on two further years of Regency at Agen and Luçon
1741-1746 Sent for Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and he was Ordained there in 1743
1746-1747 Sent to Ireland and spent a year at Clonmel
1747-1773 Sent to Limerick where most of his working life was spent. At Limerick he proved himself not only a successful schoolmaster but enjoyed a high reputation as a Preacher throughout Munster. According to the census of 1766 he conducted his school at Jail Lane, near Athlunkard St.
1773 At the Suppression of the Society, 1773, he closed his school and went to live in Dublin. He was one of the signatories of 7 February, 1774, Accepting the brief of the Suppression. He died in Dublin 15 July 1785
Such was the esteem in which his memory was held as a preacher that eleven years after his death, two volumes of his sermons were published by the aid of the generous subscriptions of his many admirers

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Joseph Moroney SJ 1714-1785
Fr Joseph Moroney was born on March 19th 1714 at Ballykeefe, Mungret, Limerick. He joined the Jesuits at Bordeaux in 1734.

Twelve years later he was sent to Ireland, where he became famous as a preacher, in Limerick, Waterford and Munster in general, but mainly in Limerick. According to a census, he conducted a school at Gaol Lane, Limerick, but on the Suppression of the Society, the school ceased to function in 1783.

He published his sermons in two volumes. They are plain instructions without any evidence of great genius or eloquence, but then he is not the only great orator who reads rather poorly in print.

Fr Moroney ended his days in Dublin where he died in 1785.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note :
Joseph Morony
Those marked with * were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MORONY, JOSEPH,was born at Limerick, on the 19th of March 1714, and joined the Society at Bordeaux, on the 4th of September, 1734. Twelve years later he came to the Mission, and was placed in his native city. On the 28th of June, 1752, he was numbered with the Professed Fathers. F. Joseph Morony became celebrated as a Preacher in Limerick, Waterford, and several parts of the Province of Munster, and left 2 Vols. of discourses printed in Dublin 12mo, 1796. The 1st Vol. contains 260pp : the 2nd 309 pp. A good judge informs me they were solid instructions in a plain stile, but without any evidence of great genius or eloquence. 1 think he died in Dublin.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

Nihill, Lawrence Arthur, 1726-1795, former Jesuit priest and Roman Catholic Bishop of Kilfenora and Kilmacduagh

  • Person
  • 23 May 1726-29 June 1795

Born: 23 May 1726, County Limerick
Entered: 31 July 1747, Lisbon, Portugal - Lusitaniae Province (LUS)
Ordained: pre 1754
Died: 29 June 1795, Killaloe, County Clare

Son of Elinor Nihill née Hackett

Nihill or Nihell is a variant of O’Neill

1757-1759 Prefect of Boarders at Irish College Poitiers

There were three other Nihell’s SJ. One was the brother of the Bishop, and John and Edward who was born at Antigua, and entered the Society at Ghent in 1768 and 1769. Edward died a victim of charity attending negroes at Trinidad in 1826 (cf Foley’s Collectanea). His Nephew was Father McShee SJ.
Ferrar’s “Limerick” :
Of a very ancient and respectable family names O’Neill. He was a near relative of Baron Harrold, Colonel of the Regiment of Königsfelt, of Colonel Nihell, of Dillon’s Regiment at Fontenoy, and of Brigadier-General in Naples, and Colonel of the Regiment of Limerick. He was also a brother to Dr James Nihell, a medical writer, and a nephew of Sir John Higgins, first physician to the King of Spain.”
1770 He published a work on “Rational Self Love”.
1778 The Archbishop of Dublin tried to get him made Bishop of Limerick, while the Bishop of Cashel and his friends supported Thomas Butler (later Lord Cahir), another ex-Jesuit.
1784 He was made Bishop of Kilfenora
1787 He was completing and preparing for press his brother James’ “Life and Doctrines of Christ” and was engaged in writing a “History of the Redemption of Man”. (These MSS are in the Milltown Park Library).
J Roche, author of “Memoirs of an Octogenarian” says “Dr Nihell was a cousin of my father’s, at whose table I well recollect him as a most welcome guest, for he was distinguished as a Priest, a scholar and a gentleman. I was present at his consecration in Limerick in 1784, when Mr Kirwan OsF was Preacher, and Lord Dunboyne, Bishop of Cork, one of the assisting prelates. Kirwan preached on apostasy, and he and Dunboyne later apostasised!” (cf O’Renehan’s “Collections” p 370)
His tomb is in the old Cathedral of Kilfenora.
Brother of Bishop Nihell. The Nihill’s were related to the Harolds, Arthurs, Macghees, McNamaras, Butlers, Woulfes and Calcutts of Limerick and Clare (in pen)
After the Suppression he was PP of Rathkeale. As he was of decided literary tastes, he resigned his parish and lived in Limerick. He died there some time post 1780. (Father Denis Murphy’s Collections)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Laurence Nihell and Alice née Arthur
His early life in the Society is hard to determine. he is mentioned only once in the LUS Catalogue 1749, which tells nothing of his studies before Entry. It seems certain that after First Vows he was sent to Coimbra for studies.
1752 In the Spring of 1752 he wrote to Fr General for permission to study Mathematics and Theology before he should return to Ireland. The General in his reply, dated 30 May, informed him that the permission asked for would be granted only if Superiors decided that such studies were necessary
1754 It is also uncertain if he was Ordained when he arrived at the Irish College Poitiers 15 December 1754 - there is no record of him in the AQUIT Catalogues of 1754 and 1758. His name at Poitiers has survived only in the Procurator's books down to 1758 when he left the Society.
1758 LEFT the Society and returned to Ireland where he was incardinated in Limerick, and succeeded Fr David Burke as PP of Rathkeale in 1762.
1767 Moved to St Mary’s Limerick as senior Curate
1783 Ordained Bishop of Kilfenora, and he died 29 June 1795 and was buried in the chancel of the old Cathedral Church of his Diocese

Nowlan, William Michael, 1723-1771, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/1839
  • Person
  • 10 January 1723-04 December 1771

Born: 10 January 1723, Dublin
Entered: 05 November 1751, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Final Vows: 02 February 1764
Died: 04 December 1771, Perugia, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

1756 At Irish College Rome, seems to have been in charge (writer seems to think he was a Priest and Procurator. There are notes of items of clothing for various Irish Jesuits. His accounts are in English and Italian
1758-1762 At Irish College Poitiers - Rector being Stephen Usher

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1763 Was “dépensier” at Irish College Poitiers (Arrêt de la Cour 1763).

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
After First Vows he spent the next four years working at the Irish College and Professed Houses in Rome. He was then sent to the Irish College Poitiers until the dissolution of the Society in France.
1762-1767 He was recalled to ROM and once more at the Irish College there. He was later sent to Teramo and then to Perugia, where he died 04 December 1771

Nugent, Dominic, 1641-1725, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1841
  • Person
  • 04 August 1641-22 June 1725

Born: 04 August 1641, Dysart, County Westmeath
Entered: 14 October 1661, Mainz, Germany - Upper Rhenish Province (RH SUP)
Ordained: 1671, Mainz, Germany
Final Vows: 1681
Died: 22 June 1725, Dysart, County Westmeath - Upper Rhenish Province (RH SUP)

Studied 3 years Philosophy and 3 Theology in Society
1665 At Molsheim RH SUP teaching Humanities
1672 Tertianship at Ettlingen, Baden-Württemberg
1708 Catalogue Preacher
1714 Catalogue Taught Grammar and Music, Spiritual Coadjutor
1717 Catalogue Taught Grammar and served on Mission many years. Humble, a lover of Religious poverty. Of great candour an sincerity. Now worn with labour and old age is now confined to his bed.
In Register of Popish priests of 1704 is Dominic Nugent, PP of Dysart, Ordained at Mainz 1674 by Archbishop Gabriel

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
In a letter dated 25 November 1694 he appears then as a PP working with great zeal and success in a poor and wretched district, and still doing this in 1714. A good Preacher (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
He is mentioned in “A List of Popish Parish Priests as they are registered at the General Sessions of the Peace held for Westmeath at Mullingar 13 July 1704 :
Dominick Nugent; Place of abode - Dysart; Age 64; Parishes of which he pretends to be Popish Parish Priest - Dysart and Churchtown; Places where he received Orders - Mentz, in Germany; From whome he received Orders - Gabriel, Suffragen of the Elector of Mentz; Sureties names that entered into recognizance for such Priest according to the Act of Parliament - Henry Mather, of Bryanstown, Gent £50 and John Nugent, of Ballynude, Gent £50;
He is mentioned in the HIB Catalogues 1708 & 1717 as a Nugent of Dysart. He had taught Grammar and Music in one of our German Colleges, and published a book of songs (music and words) called “Die Nachtigal”, thus showing that he had the hereditary love of the Nugent’s for “Music and Song”, which was possessed also by Nicholas and Robert, and their near kinsmen the Barons of Delvin and Scrine.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied in Belgium, as he was accepted for the Society at Antwerp before Ent 14 October 1661 Mainz and claimed to have Flemish
After First Vows he was sent to Mosheim, France for Philosophy and then spent two years Regency at Colleges in RH SUP. He then returned to Mainz for Thelogy and was Ordained there c 1671. He then seems to have made Tertianship, and it is a little unclear what he did next.
1675-1677 Operarius at Luxembourg
1677-1680 Member of the community at Irish College Poitiers
1680 Sent to Ireland and for the next 37 years was active mostly in Meath
1704 He was registered as PP of Dysart ad Churchtown 13 July 1704, with sureties from John Nugent of Ballynude and Henry Mather of Bryanstown. He died at Dysart c 22 June 1725
Dominic Nugent was an accomplished linguist. It is significant of the time in which he lived that in the list of languages he supplied to the compilers of the Catalogues of 1665 and 1669, he mentions Irish before English and after English Scots.
Before he left the Rhenish province he composed and set to music songs in German which were published in 1675 (Somervogel)
His own greatest claim was his devotion to his Priestly ministry in the darkest Penal times.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NUGENT, DOMINIC. The only notice I find of him is in a letter, dated Waterford, 25th November, 1694. He was doing the duty of a Parish Priest, in a poor and miserable district, and labouring with great zeal and success.

Ó Cahan, Matthew, 1703-1739, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1847
  • Person
  • 21 September 1703-15 September 1739

Born: 21 September 1703, Lisbon, Portugal
Entered: 13 September 1720, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1730, Bordeaux, France
Final Vows: 1737
Died: 15 September 1739, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1733-1737 At Irish College Poitiers teaching Humanities and Rhetoric
of Irish parentage

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education in Philosophy was at Irish College Poitiers
1722-1728 After First Vows he spent six years Regency and Périgueux and La Rochelle.
1728-1732 He then was set for Theology at Bordeaux and was Ordained 1730
1732-1733 He was sent teaching at Agen for a year
1733 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Procurator, where he worked until he died 15 September 1739. He was regarded by his contemporaries as a man of deeply religious virtue
Ignatius Kelly and his successor, Thomas Hennessy both tried to have Matthew assigned to the Irish Mission. This is but one of many instances where Irish Jesuits regarded Jesuits born abroad of Irish parents as belonging potentially to their Mission in Ireland.

O'Daly, John, 1663-1738, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1888
  • Person
  • 24 August 1663-09 December 1738

Born: 24 August 1663, Aghada, County Cork
Entered: 20 May 1692, Nancy, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)
Ordained: - pre Entry
Final Vows: 02 February 1703
Died: 09 December 1738, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)

Finished studies before entry and was a Dr of Theology (Aghada Diocese)
1696 Teacher Grammar at Pont-á-Mousson (CAMP) fit for teaching and Mission
1700-1705 In South America
1711 In Ireland
1711-1713 At Irish College Poitiers
1714 CAT was in French Indies Mission for alomost 10 years. Taught Philosophy. Strong and now Parish Priest. Strenuous worker, loves poverty and obedience. Esteemed by all for his great sincerity. Zealous in instructing young people. Undeterred by persecution. Not great prudence or public speaker. His zeal an simplicity makes up for any deficiencies.
Fr James Dailly : Infirmus at the Irish College Poitiers 1735-38, RIP 09 December 1738

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Was DD on Ent; Professor of Philosophy in CAMP;
A “hard-working Missioner; Open-hearted and fearless of persecution, the dangers of which did not prevent him from teaching children, a work in which he showed great zeal”
1699-1709 Missioner in West Indies
1717 In Ireland

◆ Fr John MacErlean SJ :
He was already Ordained before entry
1694-1696 After First Vows he was sent to teach Humanities at Épinal and Pont-à-Mousson
1696-1698 Sent to teach Philosophy at Autun
1698-1699 He was sent teaching Theology at Ensisheim, France when he volunteered to go to the Irish exiles in West Indies, in part because it was not really possible for him to go to Ireland and work there, as Priests were being arrested and deported..
1699 Arrived in Martinque on Christmas Day accompanied by Fr James Galwey
1703-1704 On the island of Guadaloupe working with the native people and then returned to Martinique to instruct Scottish and English converts
1709-1714 Returned to France and was hooping to be sent to Ireland, and while waiting served on the Mission Staff at Irish College Poitiers.
1714-1735 At last by 1714 he was able to go to Ireland and was stationed at Cork. There he remained for almost twenty two years, and he re-established the Cork Residence, where he also set up an Oratory and a small School. Ill health forced him to retire to Poitiers where he died in 1738

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
After First Vows he taught Humanities at Épinal and Pont-à-Mousson
1696 Appointed Professor of Philosophy at Autun
1698 Sent to teach Moral Theology at Ensisheim
1699-1709 Volunteered to go to the West Indies Mission, not least because it was at the time impossible to get to Ireland, as all priests were being rounded up and deported. He arrived in Martinique on Christmas Day 1699 with James Galwey
1709 Returned to France hoping to be able to slip into the Ireland of the “Penal Laws”. While waiting to travel, he served on the Mission staff of the Irish College Poitiers.
1714-1736 Eventually he managed to get in and settle in Cork where he remained for twenty two years. He re-established the Cork Residence where he set up an oratory and a small school.
1736 He retired to Poitiers where he died 09 December 1738

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father John O’Daly SJ 1663-1738
Fr John O’Daly was born in Kerry in 1663.

Having entered the Society at Nantes in 1682, while Moral Professor at Ensisheim, his offer to minister to the Irish exiles in the West Indies was accepted. He arrived at Martinique in 1703, where he looked after the Irish, and instructed English and Scotch converts.

He came back to the home Mission in 1709 and laboured in Cork until 1735. He then retired in ill health to Poitiers, where he died in 1738.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
DALY, JOHN. When in Priest’s Orders joined the Society and taught Philosophy in France, Towards the latter end of 1699, it seems he was allowed to accompany Pere Farganel to the Mission of Martinique.

O'Halloran, Joseph Ignatius, 1718-1800, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1910
  • Person
  • 24 March 1718-04 November 1800

Born: 24 March 1718, County Limerick
Entered: 15 August 1738, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1748/9, Poitiers, France
Professed: 15 August 1753
Died: 04 November 1800, Townsend Street, Dublin

1749 At Bordeaux College teaching Grammar and Rhetoric 6 years
1757-1758 At Bordeaux College teaching Humanities, Rhetoric, Physics, Philosophy and Logic
1761 At La Rochelle teaching Theology
Generally called Ignatius O’Halloran after found shelter at house of O’Halloran at Karock north of Limerick. In Clinton’s “True Devotion” called Dr O’Halloran Townsend St
In Carlow College there is a “Bonacina” with “Joseph O’Halloran Soc Iesu”
1791 Joseph O’Halloran of Dublin condemned the Oath of Allegiance
On 13th May 1770 Nano Nagle says “Ever since Mr O’Halloran has been here who has been informed of the truth of everything, nobody can interest himself more than he does for its success”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Father Gavin of ANG, is of his family.
1763 Had been Professor of Scholastic Theology at La Rochelle, and living at Rue des Cordiers, Paris, and the “Hotel garni, dit Hotel de S Pierre, chez le Seingneur Pantouffe” (Arrêt de la Cour du Parlement de Paris)
Ferrar’s 1787 “History of Limerick”, p 370, says that “he was born 19 March 1718; Was the elder brother of the famous Dr Sylvester O’Halloran; He was educated at the Jesuit College, Bordeaux, and intended to devote himself to the study of ‘physic’, but after a distinguished course of Philosophy, he entered the Novitiate as a Professor of Philosophy. He was the first to open the eyes of Bordeaux University to the futility of the Descartes principles. While Professor of Rhetoric, he published some fugitive pieces of merit, much applauded. Some of his religious tracts have already been printed. his Lectures on Philosophy were being prepared for press when he was appointed to the Chair of Divinity, in which he made no inconsiderable figure, till compelled by the Revolution of the Society (sic) to return to his native land, where he has distinguished himself by his zeal in instructing the ignorant, and by his talents in the pulpit. His sermons alone, when printed, will be no small gratification to the friends of religion and morality”. (Ferrar was a Protestant)
He went to Cork with Lord Dunboyne.
He was the early Confessor of Thomas Moore, the poet, who speaks of him in his “Travels of an Irish Gentleman”.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Michael and Mary née MacDonnell (of the Clarach family). Elder brother of the celebrated physician and historian, Dr. Sylvester O'Halloran
Had already studied Philosophy before Ent 1738 Bordeaux
1740-1745 After First Vows he was sent for Regency to La Rochelle
1745-1749 Sent to Grand Collège Poitiers for Theology and was Ordained there 1748/49
1749-1756 After his formation was completed he held a Chair of Philosophy at Bordeaux for seven years, and then a Chair of Dogmatic Theology at La Rochelle, and he was still there in 1761 at the expulsion of the Society from France
1763 Returned to Ireland and spent 10 years in Cork, until the total Suppression of the Society. He lived and worked at the Cork residence with Patrick Doran, both of them ministering at St Mary’s Chapel. He was known as a notable Preacher, but also a Catechist with children.
1773 After Suppression, he joined his colleagues in Dublin and signed their formal acceptance of the Brief of Suppression 04 February 1774. He was then incardinated in Dublin and a Curate at Townsend St Chapel (the predecessor of Westland Row) and died in Dublin 04 November 1800
1765 A Bill of Indictment was issued against “Joseph Halloran, Popish Priest and Jesuit (who is the person, along with the local Bishop had the daring insolence, publicly in a Popish Chapel near Shandon Church to set at defiance of the laws of the realm, by reflecting on and attempting to overthrow the fundamentals of the Established Church and in contempt of the indulgence given to Papists by our mild and gracious government) for endeavouring to pervert some of his Majesty’s Protestant subjects, and persuading them to embrace the erroneous doctrines of Popery”. It is possible that the case never came to Court, and there is no record of it. It may have been argued that a Catholic ceremony with doors could not be regarded as a public occasion.
1771 He was again reported for a similar offence “A gentleman of the tribe of Loyola, agreed with his Bishop to have public disputations on the consistency of the two religions. The Jesuit undertook to support the Protestants - the Bishop Popery. This controversy was carried on many days at the Chapel, to the entire refutation of the Protestant divine. The audience testified their joy by repeated shouts for this defeat by the strong arguments f his Lordship (as he is styled among them). This public insult to the laws, though known to every person in the town, did not raise a champion to assist the good-natured Jesuit, either amongst our magistrates or clergy. Alaz! They were employed in their departments, in sharing the loaves and fishes. However, a champion at length appeared - an honest cooper, with more zeal than wit, objected to some tenets urged by the Bishop, to his great confusion and dismay. Thus ended the farce, but the poor cooper paid dearly for his temerity. A party was made against him, who have since driven him to beggary and ruin”.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Joseph O’Halloran 1718-1800
Joseph Ignatius O’Halloran was born in the North Liberties of Limerick in 1718. He was educated at the Jesuit College Bordeaux. He intended to become a doctor of Medicine, but he changed his mind and entered the Society at Bordeaux in 1745.

Appointed Professor of Philosophy, he was the first to open the eyes of the University of Bordeaux to the merits of the systems of Descartes and Newton. He was successively Professor of Rhetoric, Philosophy and Divinity at Bordeaux. Some fugitive pieces of great merit were written by him and were much admired by the University.

On the Suppression of the Society he returned to Ireland. He accompanied Dr Butler (Lord Dunboyne) to Cork and was attached to the North Chapel for years. From Cork he came to Dublin where he died on November 4th 1800, and he is buried the vaults of St Michan’s Church.

The following is an extract from Tom Moore’s “Travels of an Irish Gentleman” :
“I used set off early in the morning to ----- St Chapel, trembling all over with awe at the task that was before me, but resolved to tell the wordy. How vividly do I even at this moment remember, kneeling down by the confessional, and feeling my heart beat quicker as the sliding panel in the side opened, and I saw the meek and venerable form of Fr O’Halloran stooping to hear my whispered list of sins. The paternal look of the old man, the gentleness of his voice, even in rebuke, the encouraging hopes he gave of mercy as the sure reward of contrition and reformation – all these recollections come freshly ever to mind”.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note : Joseph O’Halloran
Those marked with
were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
O’HALLORAN, JOSEPH IGNATIUS, born in Limerick, in 1726. After having passed his course of Philosophy with singular reputation under the Jesuits at Bordeaux, he entered their Novitiate. Appointed to the chair of Philosophy in that City, he had the merit and courage of introducing the Newtonian System. Promoted to the Professorship of Theology, he maintained his increasing reputation, until the persecutions of his Order compelled him to return to his native Country. Accompanying Lord Dunboyne to Cork, he spent several years in that City, where attaching himself to the North Chapel, he commenced Public Catechism, was most assiduous in the Confessional, and in preparing Children for their first Communion. He greatly distinguished himself by his talents in the Pulpit and was universally respected as a saintly Missioner, as a man of elevated mind, gentlemanly manners, and most prepossessing in his appearance.
This is the Reverend Father alluded to pp. 79-80 Vol 1. “Travels of an Irish Gentleman in search of Religion” by Thomas Moore Esq.
That he died in Dublin during the month of November, 1800, is certain and probably was buried in the vault of St. Michan s Church, where reposed the ashes of several of his BB.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

O'Hartegan, Matthew, 1600-1666, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1912
  • Person
  • 1600-02 May 1666

Born: 1600, Limerick
Entered: 08 January 1626, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1633, Bordeaux, France
Final vows: 15 August 1641, Waterford
Died: 02 May 1666, Grand Collège, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Was already a “Jurista”. Had studied 2 years Philosophy and 2 Jurisprudence on Ent
1628 First Vows 09 January 1628
1628-1630 At Pau College AQUIT taught Grammar
1630-1636 At Bordeaux Collège studying Theology, teaching Grammar and Philosophy
1636-1637 Minister at La Rochelle
1637 In Ireland for 4 years
1647-1648 Taught Physics at Bordeaux
1648-1650 At Pau College teaching Philosophy
1650-1651 Minister and Consultor at Périgord Collège; 1651-1652 At Tulle Collège teaching Grammar; 1655-1656 At Poitiers (MIn & Cons)
1656-1657 Superior of Bayonne Mission
1657-1660 At Agen College Consultor and teaching Physics, also a Casuist there
1660-1666 At Poitiers Confessor and later infirmus (Verdier Rector at that time)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
(In Pen) First Vows 09 January 1628; RIP Poitiers 1665 (Sommervogel)
1659 He was probably Superior of the Mission as “Nathaniel Hart” (but this is also ascribed to Richard Shelton, who was Superior of Irish Mission)
He was a much esteemed Agent of the Confederation at the French Court; Prudent, and much liked by the Nuncio in Paris. He had been sent over by the Catholics of Ireland to beg assistance from the King in their distress, the kingdom presenting a scene of general conflagration and bloodshed, the Catholics fighting for freedom of conscience, and their lawful King against the Puritans (Letter of Robert Nugent 24 April 1642). When in Paris the petition of the twenty-five thousand Irish - driven by persecution to St Kitts - arrived. Father Hartegan offered himself as one of two Fathers to be sent for their spiritual relief - Letter of Father Hartegan 30 Marhc 1643 (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
Often mentioned by Nuncio to Ireland Rinuccini
Considered a religious and clever man.
A correspondent of Wadding. Several of his letters are in Carte’s “Ormond” and Mr Gilberty’s works on “Irish History”
He volunteered to help the Irish at St Kitts (cf Foley’s Collectanea).

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already studied Philosophy and Jurisprudence and had graduated MA before Ent 08 January 1626 Bordeaux
1628-1630 After First Vows he was sent on Regency to Agen,
1630-1634 He was then sent to Bordeaux for Theology where he was Ordained 1633
1634-1636 Sent to Pau to teach Philosophy
1636-1637 Sent as Minister at La Rochelle
1637-1642 Sent to Ireland. No record of his work except that he made FV at Waterford 15 August 1641. It may be reasonable to surmise that he was known to the newly constituted “Confederation of Kilkenny”, as he was instructed to represent them the following year in France - the Mission Superior duly notified the General of this business.
1642-1646 Sent to France to take charge of what might be called the Embassy of Ireland in France on behalf of the Supreme Council of the Confederation of Kilkenny. He was at Beziers June 4, Lyon July 15 and settled in Paris as “Agent” August 8th until May 1646 when, having finished or resigned his mission he returned to Bordeaux. He along with Geoffrey Baron (nephew of Luke Wadding OFM) were formally appointed as agents at the French Court.
1646 After he resigned his post, he continued to live in Paris and then moved to Bordeaux. In the course of his court business, he had managed to earn the distrust of Queen Henrietta, wife of Charles I. Letters on the Queen and supposedly written by O’Hartegan were seized and published in London. They were considered a forgery, however they were also used as a favourite weapon of counter-diplomacy, and even the Supreme Council were not convinced that O’Hartegan had written them - the originals of which were never produced.
1648 Two years after his return to Bordeaux, The General Carafa asked the AQUIT Provincial to summon a Meeting of Consultors to choose a priest of their Province to conduct an extraordinary Visitation of the Irish Mission, and O’Hartegan was invited to take part in the consultation. The choice fell on Mercure Verdier, who possibly owed some of his grasp of the political-religious situation in Ireland to O’Hartegan.
He was never to return to Ireland and was sent to teach at various Colleges in AQUIT. he taught Philosophy at Bordeaux (1646-1648), at Pau (1648-1650) and Agen (1657-1660) . He conducted weight AQUIT business at Paris, and briefly was Superior at Bayonne.
1660 He was sent to Grand Collège Poitiers as Operarius, and he died there 02 May 1666

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
O'Hartegan, Matthew
by Aoife Duignan

O'Hartegan, Matthew (1600–66), Jesuit priest and confederate agent, was born in August 1600 in Limerick. Originally intending to pursue a lay career, he studied philosophy and jurisprudence, and was awarded an MA, but subsequently entered the Society of Jesus at Bordeaux on 8 January 1626. After a short period of regency at Agen, he began theological studies at Bordeaux in 1630. He was ordained in spring 1633, and thereafter became professor of philosophy at Pau. He was transferred as minister to the college of La Rochelle in 1636, and at the end of that year was assigned to the Irish mission. There are no records of his term in Ireland, except that he made his solemn profession at Waterford, on 15 August 1641. He acted on behalf of the Catholic Confederate Association in Paris in 1642, and he and Geoffrey Barron (qv) were officially appointed agents to the French court by the supreme council on 23 July 1643. His efforts to ensure the continued support of France and to procure aid involved him in contact with the papal nuncio in France, Grimaldi, Cardinal Mazarin, and Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.

In March 1645 the confederate supreme council expressed concern at a number of letters allegedly written by O'Hartegan, which criticised the influence on the council of Charles I's viceroy, James Butler (qv), marquess of Ormond. Although the council stated that it believed the letters to be forged, O'Hartegan's suitability to act for the association was increasingly called into question, with concerns over his ‘vanitye, and exaltation of himselfe’ and ‘disrespect and scandalous calumnyes by him’ (Gilbert, Ir. confed., iv, 205). He also alienated Henrietta Maria, who doubted the sincerity of his desire for peace.

In regular contact with GianBattista Rinuccini (qv) in Paris, he organised the nuncio's passage to Ireland. Rinuccini discussed the possibility of O'Hartegan's returning to his religious duties in October 1645; he ultimately finished or resigned his agency in Paris in May 1646 and returned to Bordeaux. Despite this, he retained an interest in developments in Ireland, and continued to voice his suspicions about the integrity of royal intentions. The general of the Society of Jesus, Father Caraffa, made a request to the provincial at Bordeaux 1648 to choose a priest for an examination of the Irish mission. O'Hartegan was deeply involved in this process, and the ultimate choice, Mercure Verdier, owed much of his familiarity with the complex politico-religious situation in Ireland to O'Hartegan. However, O'Hartegan was never again recalled to the Irish mission. He held a number of posts in his own province of Aquitaine, including professor of philosophy at Bordeaux (1646–8), and at Pau (1648–50). In the mid 1650s the general of the society expressed concern about the spiritual welfare of Irish inhabitants on the island of St Kitts, prompting O'Hartegan's offer to settle there; however, he does not appear to have gone to the West Indies. He held the professorship of philosophy at Agen 1657–60 and also conducted much weighty business for his province at Paris, briefly acting as superior at Bayonne. In 1660 he was assigned to the Grand College of Poitiers where he served as operarius until his death on 2 May 1666.

Francis Finnegan, ‘A biographical dictionary of Irish Jesuits in the time of the society's third mission, 1598–1773’, Milltown Park MSS, Irish Jesuit Archives, Dublin; G. Aiazzi (ed.), The embassy in Ireland of Monsignor G. B. Rinuccini, archbishop of Fermo, in the years 1645–9, trans. Annie Hutton (1873); Gilbert, Ir. confed., iii, 68–73, 107–9, 186, 233–4, 261; iv, xx–xv, 1, 36–38, 119, 203–6, 377–8; HMC, Report on Franciscan manuscripts preserved at the convent, Merchants' Quay, Dublin (1906), 150, 197, 201, 231; NHI, iii (1976), 598; L. McRedmond, To the greater glory: a history of the Irish Jesuits (1991), 67, 82; J. Lowe (ed.), Clanricarde letter book (1993), 149; Micheál Ó Siochrú, Confederate Ireland, 1642–1649: a constitutional and political analysis (1999), 51, 263

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Mathew O’Hartegan SJ 1600-1666
Fr Matthew O’Hartegan was born in St John’s Parish Limerick, and he entered the Society in 1626.

Together with Frs Michael Chamberlain and Thomas Maguire, he was appointed Chaplain to the Confederate Forces in Ireland in 1642.The same year he was sent by the Confederation of Kilkenny as accredited Irish Agent to the King of France. A great deal of controversy exists as to the success of his mission. At any rate, he was recalled in 1645.

The rest of his life was spent in the Province of Aquitaine, to which he belonged. He died at Poitiers about 1666.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
O’HARTEGAN , MATTHEW. A letter of F. Robert Nugent dated from Ireland, the 24th of April, 1642, shows, that F. Hartegan had just been sent over to France by the Catholic National Association, and the Bishops, to solicit the aid of his Most Christian Majesty. He states that Ireland presented a spectacle of general conflagration and bloodshed, and that the Catholics were fighting for freedom of conscience, for their legitimate King, and for their country, against the Puritans. F. Hartegan during the year he spent in this negotiation displayed much ardour; but his success was not equal to his expectations. This may have been owing to the extreme illness of Cardinal Richlieu. Another object was then taken up in Letter keeping with his religious profession. I learn from his own letter, dated Paris, the 30th of March, 1643, that Pere Jordan Forrestier, the Procurator of the Provinces of France, had placed in his hands on the 25th of March, the petition of 25,000 Irishmen, who by the persecution and iniquity of the times had been forced to expatriate themselves, and settle in St. Kitts, and the adjoining isles. Their petition had been brought over by the French Admiral Du Poenry, who backed their petition for two Irish Jesuits to be sent to them to administer the consolations of Religion to their destitute and afflicted countrymen. F. Hartegan offered himself for this Mission, and represented his vigour of constitution, his knowledge of the Irish, English, and French languages, and his vehement desire of labouring in this or any other similar Mission. Probably his wish was granted, for afterwards he disappears altogether.

O'Neill, Francis, 1697-1739, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1933
  • Person
  • 13 October 1697-04 September 1739

Born: 13 October 1697, Lismore, County Waterford
Entered: 29 October 1722, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: c 1728, Poitiers, France
Died: 04 September 1739, Dublin - Romanae Province (ROM)

1726 At Vannes teaching Humanities FRA
1727-1729 At Poitiers (Hogan note Francis Neale at Poitiers in Theology in 1728 - name written Neale)
April 1717 “Ex libris P Francis O’Neill, Miss HIB, Soc Jesuqui coemit et Adminsitratoribus Joannis Haugheme presbyteri Waterford” where not given (Cat Chrn p68)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1728 In Irish College Poitiers in second years Theology
“Francisci O’Neill SJ, Coll. Hyb. Soc Iesu Pictavii” - in a life of St Francis Regis, ed 1717, also in a book ed 1703.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had completed a lot of his Priestly studies (Philosophy and Theology), probably in France, before Ent 29 October 1722 Paris
After First Vows he was sent for Regency to Vannes and then, on the orders of the General to Grand Collège Poitiers to finish his Theology, and he was Ordained there 1728
1728-1729 On the staff at Irish College Poitiers
1729-1737 After a very short Tertianship he was sent to Ireland and Waterford, arriving 13 November 1729. He worked as a Curate and Minister there until 1737
1737 Sent to Cork, but only stayed a short while. He came to Dublin, probably for medical treatment for a fatal illness, and died there 04/09/1739
He was recognised in France no less than in Ireland as a man of true apostolic worth

O'Rian, William, 1628-1700, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1951
  • Person
  • 22 April 1628-01 December 1700

Born: 22 April 1628, County Kilkenny
Entered: 11 November 1647, Kilkenny
Ordained: c. 1658, Bourges, France
Final vows: 02 February 1663
Died: 01 December 1700, Irish College, Poitiers, France

Superior of Mission 1676-1679

Has studied 2 years Philosophy before Ent
1651 At La Flèche College studying Theology
1655 At Bourges College FRA - Excellent talent, fit to teach or govern
1658 “William Orient” teaching in FRA
1661 At Arras College teaching Grammar and Philosophy
1665 At Bourges College teaching
1669 At La Flèche College teaching Grammar, Humanities and Philosophy
1679-1700 First Rector of Irish College Poitiers (1679-1691). 1691 Prefect of Boarders
“William O’Rian, President of Poitiers Irish College in 1723, b Kilkenny 18 April 1628, E 11 November1647, taught Philosophy and Scholastic Theology. Master of Arts and Doctor of Theology. Prof 4 vows 02/02/1663 has been Superior of whole Irish Mission”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Had studied Humanities and two years Philosophy before Ent. he knew Latin, Irish and English. (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI)
1650 Taught Grammar
1678 Superior of Irish Mission and then arrested in October 1678, in the Titus Oates Plot, a prisoner, but soon after honourably liberated by the Viceroy and Privy Council.
1679-1683 Rector at Irish College Poitiers (cf letters for ANG Provincial John Warner in letters dated 09 April and 06 August 1683, - Father Warner’s Note and Letter-book. He had arrived at Poitiers 29 May 1679, and in a letter sated the following day, he mentions that Archbishop Peter Talbot and his brother Richard, with Viscount Mountgarrett’s son Edmund Butler, still remained close prisoners. He tells also of a proclamation by the Viceroy in October requiring the departure of all Catholic Bishops and Regular Clergy from Ireland, and of a reward recently offered for the apprehension of every Bishop and Jesuit, being £5 for every Abbot or other Regular.
Professor of Theology in France

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education was at Kilkenny with the Jesuits
After First Vows and following the dispersal of the Irish Scholastics in the face of the Puritan forces, he was sent to La Flèche for studies where he graduated MA. He then spent three years Regency in FRA Colleges. After Regency he was then sent to Bourges for Theology, graduating DD and where he was Ordained 1658
1659-1672 Taught Philosophy at Amiens, Bourges and La Flèche, and then Theology at Bourges
1672 Sent to Ireland
1676-1679 Superior of Irish Mission. In 1677 he made a Visitation of the newly founded Irish College Poitiers, and on his return was arrested in connection with the Titus Oates's Plot. Nothing incriminating was found amongst his papers but he was ordered to be deported to France on 26 February 1679
1679 He arrived in France and went to Irish College Poitiers
1680-1689 Rector of Irish College Poitiers
1691-1698 He was Prefect of Boarders at Irish College Poitiers, and forced to retire due to poor health. He died there 01 December 1700

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962

William O’Rian (1676-1680)
William O Rian was born at Kilkenny on 22nd April, 1628. After studying in the Jesuit College there as far as the end of his second year of philosophy, he entered the Kilkenny Novitiate on 11th November, 1647. When the Kilkenny schools were broken up, he went to France, and took out his degree of Master of Arts at the College of La Flèche. He taught grammar then for three years, studied theology for four, and obtained the degree. of Doctor of Theology at Bourges in 1658. We next find him teaching philosophy at Amiens (1658-60) and grammar at Arras (1660-61). After making his tertianship at Rouen (1661-62), he resumed his professional career at Caen, where he made his solemn profession of four vows on 2nd February, 1663. He lectured next on philosophy at Bourges for two years, was Prefect of Repetitions at La Flèche for one, and finally became Professor of Scholastic Theology at Bourges in 1669. In 1671 he went to Paris on business of the Irish Mission, and returned to Ireland in 1672. He was appointed Superior of the Mission on 14th March, 1676. In 1677 he made a Visitation of the Irish College at Poitiers, and in the following year he was arrested at Carlow in connexion with Oates's Plot. Nothing incriminating was found among his papers, and he was ordered for transportation on 26th February, 1679. He was landed in France, where he became Rector of the Irish College of Poitiers in 1680, an office he held till 1691. In his later years he had charge of the boarding students (1691-98), until his health gave way, and he died, after two years of infirmity, on 1st December, 1700.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father William Ryan 1628-1700
William Ryan attended our College in Kilkenny as far as second year Philosophy. He then entered the noviceship in 1647.

For the rest of his studies he went to the continent, La Flèche, Bourges, Amiens, Rouen, Caen. He lectured on Philosophy at Bourges and La Flèche.

He returned to Ireland in 1672, and became Superior of the Mission in 1676. Two years later he was arrested in Carlow in connection with the Titus Oates’ Plot, and as a result was banished from Ireland.

He went to Poitiers, where he became Rector. He died at Poitiers on December 1st 1700.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
RYAN, WILLIAM, was fellow Novice with Father Stephen Rice, and I think succeeded him in the government of the Irish Mission. Whilst Superior he was arrested towards the end of October, 1678, and kept in close custody, on suspicion of being concerned in Oates’s Conspiracy : but his innocence appeared so manifest to the Viceroy and Privy Council, that he was most honourably acquitted and set at liberty. A letter written by him, and dated the 30th of May, 1679, announces his safe arrival at Poitiers the day before. He adds that his Grace the Archbishop of Dublin, and his brother, Richard Talbot, with the son of Viscount Mountgaret, still remained close prisoners. He mentions the Proclamation of the Viceroy, issued last October, for the departure of all the Catholic Bishops and Regular Clergy from the realm of Ireland, as also the recent Reward offered of 10l. English for the apprehension of every Bishop and Jesuit, and of 5l for every Abbot or other Regular so apprehended. On the 5th of July, 1679, Father Ignatius Brown recommended Father William Ryan for the Rectorship of the new College at Poitiers; but further I cannot trace him.

Perryman, Robert, d 1635, Jesuit scholastic

  • IE IJA J/1978
  • Person
  • d 09 March 1675, Poitiers

Entered: 1655, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Died: 09 March 1675, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

◆ CATSJ I-Y has
Ent 1755 Bordeaux
1755-1757 At Irish College Poitiers

Plunkett, Patrick, 1704-1733, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1990
  • Person
  • 1704-26 December 1733

Born: 1704, Connaught
Entered: 13 September 1720, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: c 1732, Poitiers, France
Died: 26 December 1733, Galway Residence - Romanae Province (ROM)

At time of entry the only Connaught man in the Society (Ignatius Roche letter of 1732)
1723-1727 at College of Pau AQUIT teaching Grammar
1727-1729 At Limoges teaching Humanities and Rhetoric
1729 At Angoulême
1729-1733 At Irish College Poitiers studying Theology

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1722-1724 After First Vows he was sent to study Philosophy at Pau
1724-1729 He was then sent on Regency teaching at Limoges and Angoulême.
1729-1733 At the request of the Irish Mission Superior he was then sent to Grand Collège Poitiers for Theology and was Ordained there c 1732
1733 Sent to Ireland following repeated prayer and requests, but died three months later at the Galway Residence 26 December 1733. He had been in poor health during his studies

Power, James, 1725-1788, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2002
  • Person
  • 27 March 1725-11 March 1788

Born: 27 March 1725, County Cork
Entered: 13 January 1742, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 1754 Paris, France
Final Vows: 15 August 1756
Died: 11 March 1788, Liège, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Son of Thomas
Brother of Edmund RIP 1779

1746 At Alençon College FRA
1752 At Louis le Grand Collège, Paris in 2nd year Theology
1756 Teaching Rhetoric at Bourges College
1757 At Bourges College FRA. Master of Arts from Poitiers. Teaching Grammar and Rhetoric
1761 At Paris College Prof Philosophy

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Probably elder brother of Edmund???
Professor of Philosophy at Jesuit College Paris
ANG Catalogues 1763 & 1771 named as Writer. Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS says he was a highly gifted scholar.
1760 Transcribed to ANG
1763 Missioner at St Ignatius College London for a number of years
1773 Initially at St Stephen’s Green, Bow, London and then went to Liège after the Suppression of the Society in France (Arrêt de la Cour de Parlement de Paris)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had previously graduated MA at Poitiers before Ent 13 June 1742 Paris
After First Vows he was sent for Regency to Alençon and La Flèche, and then back to Paris fo studies and he was Ordained there
After Ordination he was sent to Bourges to teach, but recalled to Paris
For a time after the dissolution of the Society he was in ANG teaching, but his latter years were spent at Liège where he died 11 March 1788

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
POWER, JAMES, was born in Ireland on the 27th of March, 1725; joined the Order in 1742, and was admitted to the Profession of the Four Vows in 1760. This highly-gifted scholar and very profound Mathematician, had taught Philosophy, &c. in France; but retiring to the English College, at Liege, died there on the 11th of March, 1783.

Purcell, John, 1595-1657, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2014
  • Person
  • 22 June 1595-12 April 1657

Born: 22 June 1595, Dublin
Entered: 19 November 1618, Nancy, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)
Ordained: c 1623, Paris, France
Died: 12 April 1657, Irish College, Poitiers, France

Had studied Rhetoric and Philosophy at Douai and Rhetoric at Dijon c 1620
1622 At Pont-á-Mousson studying Philosophy or in Metaphysics or in FRA (the first I find since Holiwood and Richard Field) in 3td year Philosophy
1625 In College of Paris FRA studying Theology
1626 Catalogue In Ireland
1637 Catalogue Talent and judgement good, prudent and teaching is mediocre. Able to teach Humanities
1649 Catalogue is given at Dublin
1650 Catalogue DOB 1592, Ent 1620. Is a teacher, Confessor, Preacher and a Formed Coadjutor. Age 57. Came to Mission in 1627

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Knew Irish, English, French and Latin; Had taught Humanities and been a Confessor and Preacher for eighteen years (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI)
Hogan says Ent 1618, and death post 1650, stating that he had been in prison.
1642 A Missioner in Dublin, and still there 1649 in weak health (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Irish College Douai before Ent 19 November 1618 Nancy
1620-1621After First Vows he was sent to teach Rhetoric for a year at Dijon
1621-1622 He was then sent to Pont-à-Mousson for Philosophy
1622-1624 He was then sent for Theology to Paris and was Ordained there c 1623
1625/26 Sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence and was teaching until the closure of the school at Back Lane. In spite of the Puritan occupation and poor health, he continued to live in Dublin until 1649/50, when he was arrested, imprisoned and deported to France.
The General was especially solicitous of fate of the Dublin priests during the Cromwell regime, and he made arrangements for John to be received by AQUIT. He was sent then to Grand Collège Poitiers The Annual Letter of the Province of AQUIT said of him “Died at Poitiers, Father John Purcell, an Irish Father of singular virtue and zeal. He suffered three months of imprisonment and other hardships for the faith”

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
PURCELL, JOHN, was an active Missionary in Dublin in the autumn of 1642. At the end of February following I find that he had become an Invalid; but he was still living in that city in the summer of 1649, infirmae valetudinis et jam senior.

Reade, Simon, 1672-1731, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2030
  • Person
  • 01 January 1672-01 February 1731

Born: 01 January 1672, Dublin
Entered: 31 July 1696, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1703/4, Poitiers, France
Died: 01 February 1731, Dublin Residence - Romanae Province (ROM)

Studied 2 years Philosophy and 3 Theology, and taught Grammar in Society
1703-1706 Minister and in Theology at Poitiers
1706-1707 Tertianship at Marans
1707-1710 At Residence Saint-Macaire AQUIT teaching Humanities and Prefect of the Church
1711-1715 Spiritual Father at Poitiers
1717 Catalogue Prof 4 Vows. Is now with a noble family in the country giving edification. Is grave and modest, good judgement and a lover of poverty, chastity and obedience. Talent for Mission work and fit to be a Confessor. Assigned to ROM Province
Some of his books printed after 1696 are at Clongowes

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1717 In Ireland, living with some gentleman’s family, and a zealous and solid religious.
Entries in old books show he belonged to the Dublin Residence.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education was at Irish College Poitiers, and he had already commenced Priestly studies there before Ent 30 July 1696 Rome
1698-1701 After First Vows he was sent for a year of Regency to Sezze College, and then, and the instructions of the General, sent for Philosophy to Lyons (LUGD)
1701-1706 Sent to Grand Collège Poitiers (AQUIT) to continue his Theology studies and where he was Ordained 1703/04. During this time he served as Minister at the Irish College.
1706-1707 Made Tertianship at Marennes
1707-1711 Sent teaching Humanities at St Macaire, near Bordeaux. he was also Prefect of the Church at St Macaire.
1711-1715 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Spiritual Father
1715-1725 Sent to Ireland for health reasons and worked in the Dublin area, working from the house of a nobleman in the Dublin area.
1725 Assistant Priest in a Dublin city parish and he died there 01 February 1731

Reilly, John, 1703-1756, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2039
  • Person
  • 23 September 1703-05 December 1756

Born: 23 September 1703, Leinster
Entered: 18 January 1726, Naples, Italy - Napoletanae Province (NAP)
Ordained: 1734, Naples, Italy
Died: 05 December 1756, Irish College, Poitiers, France

Spent 8 days in Irish College Rome and on 13 January 1726 went to the Novitiate at Naples - Arc I C Rome Lib IV f.249
1730-1734 At Coll Max Naples studying Philosophy. Talent, proficiency and prudence good. Experience beyond his years. Would be able for any duty if his judgement displayed itself.
1736 Prefect of Studies Irish College Rome - came from Naples Arc I C Rome Lib IX 138
1737 Not in Catalogue

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ:
After First Vows he was sent for studies at Naples where he was Ordained 1734
1736-1737 On the completion of his studies he was sent as Prefect of Studies to the Irish College Rome
1737-1748 The General sent him to Ireland, and he arrived in Galway Residence in March 1738, and he worked there for eleven years. In the opinion of the Mission Superior, Thomas Hennessy, Reilly was more suited to the contemplative than the active religious life, and so he was withdrawn from the Irish Mission and sent to Poitiers as a Spiritual Father, and he died there 05 December 1756

Relly, James, 1640-1707, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2042
  • Person
  • 02 February 1640-24 August 1707

Born: 02 February 1640, County Dublin
Entered: 20 June 1667, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1666, Rome, Italy, - pre Entry
Final Vows: 15 August 1677
Died: 24 August 1707, Irish College, Poitiers, France

Superior of Mission 2 October 1684-1690

1672 At Loreto College
1678-1693 At Irish College Rome teaching Grammar and Philosophy (M Phil), Prefect of Studies, Penitentiary and Spiritual Father. Distinguished in his Philosophy and Theology studies. Capable of teaching the higher subjects.
1693 Had been Superior of Irish Mission
1691-1700 Rector of Irish College Poitiers and again in 1703 and remained at Poitiers where he died

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1668 In pen : Taught at Viterbo
1678 In pen : Irish and Greek Colleges Rome, Prefect of Studies
1684 Superior of Irish Mission 02 October 1684, residing in Dublin.
1697-1699 Rector of irish College Poitiers.
“An indefatigable labourer in the vineyard” (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
A very distinguished scholar; Exiled; Rector of Poitiers; Talents are praised by Dr Peter Talbot; Had defended theses “ex universa theologia” in the Roman College in 1667 (cf de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ” and his article “Rome; Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Humanities at Lille (1656-1660) and Paris graduating MA. He then went to the Irish College Rome 25 September 1662, and was Ordained there February 1666, before Ent 20 June 1667 St Andrea, Rome
1669-1671 After First Vows he was sent teaching Humanities at Viterbo.
1671-1672 He was sent as Penitentiary at Loreto.
1672-1674 He was sent Teaching Philosophy at Perugia.
1674-1676 Prefect of Studies at the Greek College Rome.
1676-1681 He was sent as Prefect of Studies at the Irish College Rome.
1681-1682 He was sent to teach Theology at Siena
1684-1690 Sent to Ireland, arriving October 1683. He was appointed Irish Mission Superior on 26 August 1684. His years in office coincided with the Catholic revival under James II. He trued his best to satisfy the many requests for Colleges of the Society.
1690-1691 Remained in Ireland
1691-1700 Appointed Rector of Irish College Poitiers. He remained there after Office and was a Consultor of the College. He died there 24 August 1707
To Father Relly we are indebted for a History of the Irish College, Rome, and the many interesting letters he wrote illustrating the persecution of the Church in Ireland in the early years of the regime of William III

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
James Relly (1684-1687)
James Relly was born in the county of Dublin on 2nd February, 1640. He went to Belgium in 1656, and studied humanities at Lille till 1660, when he went to Paris and took out his degree of Master of Philosophy there in 1662. He accompanied the Archbishop of Armagh, Edmund O'Reilly, to Rome, and was admitted into the Irish College there on 25th September, 1662. In February, 1666 he was ordained priest, and celebrated his first Mass on the 14th of that month in the Church of S Maria Maggiore. He entered the Novitiate of the Society at Sant' Andrea on 20th June, 1667.
After teaching grammar at Viterbo, he acted as Penitentiary at Loreto for one year (1671-72). He then taught a course of philosophy at Perugia; acted as Prefect of Studies at the Greek College in Rome for half a year, when he was transferred in the same capacity to the Irish College in April, 1676. He made his solemn profession of four vows on 15th August, 1677. In 1681 he was appointed Professor of Theology at Siena. Two years later he was sent to Ireland, where he arrived in October, 1683. On 26th August, 1684, he was appointed Superior of the Mission. His years of office fell during the Catholic revival. under James II. Fr Relly tried to satisfy as best he could the many requests for colleges of the Society, and he opened a chapel in Dublin. At the end of his term as Superior he remained in Ireland till 1691, and on the 9th of June of which year he was appointed Rector of the Irish College of Poitiers, a position he held for nine years. He passed the last seven years of his life there as Consultor of the College, and died on 24th August, 1707. To Fr Relly we are indebted for a history of the Irish College in Rome and many letters illustrating the persecution in Ireland during the early years of William III.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father James Relly 1640-1707
James Relly, a Dublin man was the 24th Mission Superior of the Irish Mission from 1684-1687. He was already a priest with his Master’s degree in Philosophy when he entered the Society at Rome in 1667.
His Superiorship fell within the brief period of the Catholic Revival under James II, and thus he was able to open a chapel in Dublin.

His term of office over, he remained in Ireland until 1691, when he was appointed Rector of the Irish College at Poitiers. This post he held for 9 years. He died at Poitiers on August 24th 1707.

We are indebted to him for a history of the Irish College at Rome and also for many letters dealing with the Persecution in Ireland during the early years of William and Mary.

Rice, Stephen, 1625-1699, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2047
  • Person
  • 03 April 1625-07 January 1699

Born: 03 April 1625, Dingle, County Kerry
Entered: 20 May 1648, Kilkenny
Ordained: 13 March 1660, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 03/ November 1664
Died: 07 January 1699, Dublin Residence - Romanae Province (ROM)

Alias James Flent
Superior of Mission 08 October 1672

Had studied 2 years Philosophy before Ent. Taught Humanities 16 years. Was Superior of Irish Mission
1666 Is living near New Ross teaching school at his Boarding School. Preaches Catechetics in the country and does parochial work. Very good. On Mission 5 years. Has good talents with great fitness for catechising and teaching boys.
1679-1682 Minister and Prefect of Boarders at Irish College Poitiers
There is at Clongowes a “Praxis Episcopalis” Ed 1618 in which is written “P Ig. Rice”

1660 or 1662 Sent to Ireland from Professed House at Antwerp
1662 Living in New Ross where he kept a boarding school, and was engaged in Preaching, Catechising etc, and also occasionally acting as PP
1672 Superior of the Mission, and recommended for the same office in 1697 . Father Kelly, Rector at Poitiers, in a letter to the General, recommends Stephen Rice to be the Superior of the Mission again in a letter dated 26 May 1697 (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
He is the author of a long and most interesting history of the Irish Mission SJ 1669-1675 (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
Highly eulogised in letters of the martyred Archbishop Plunkett to the General Oliva, dated Dublin 22 November 1672 and Armagh 31 January 1673
Much praised for learning, zeal, eloquence, holiness etc, by Primate Plunket and Dr Peter Talbot
Note from No Ch Name (actually George) Murphy :
Named in an Italian letter, dated Dublin 22 November 1672, ad written by the Martyr, the Archbishop Oliver Plunket, Primate of Ireland, to Father General Oliva, in which, after expressing his affectionate regard for the Society, and informing him of the meritorious labours of Fathers Rice and Ignatius Brown at Drogheda, he speaks of Father Murphy as a good Theologian, and excellent religious man, a man of great talent, and a distinguished preacher in the Irish language. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of James and Phyllis née Fanning (daughter of Edmund of Limerick) and brother of Br Nicholas Rice (LEFT?)
Studied Humanities and Philosophy under the Jesuits at Kilkenny before Ent 20 May 1648 Kilkenny
A year after First Vows he was sent to Flanders for Regency before Theology at Louvain where he was Ordained 13 March 1660
1662 Sent to Ireland and initially to Limerick
1663-1670 Sent to join Stephen Gellous at New Ross, where he taught Humanities and Rhetoric for the next seven years
1670-1672 Went to Drogheda to organise the College there which was opened by Blessed Oliver Plunket.
1672-1678 Superior of the Mission 08/10/1672. A fresh wave of persecution meant that the schools had to be closed and missionary work carried on in secret. During his term of office the Irish College, Poitiers was established, not only as a school for boys, but also a refuge for old, inform or exiled Irish Missioners. Before he finished Office he wrote at length to the General regarding the Irish Mission 1669-1675.
1678-1682 At the time of the Oates's Plot, 1678, he was arrested and then deported. He went to Poitiers and was Minister of the Irish College until 1682
1682 Sent back to Ireland and Limerick. After the surrender of Limerick he came to Dublin as Consultor of the Mission, and he died there 07 January 1699, and is buried in St. Catherine’s Churchyard

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Stephen Rice (1672-1675)

Stephen Rice, son of James Rice, of Dinglicoush, and Phyllis, daughter of Edmund Tanning, of Limerick, was born at Dingle on 3rd April, 1625. He made his early studies up to philosophy at the College of Kilkenny, where he entered the Novitiate of the Society on 20th May, 1648. In 1651 he was sent to Flanders, where, after the usual course of teaching and study, he was ordained priest on 13th March, 1660, during his fourth year of theology at Louvain. On his return to Ireland he was stationed first at Limerick (1662), but next year he was sent to New Ross, where he taught school for seven years. He made his solemn profession of four vows at Dublin on 3rd November, 1664. In 1670 he went to Drogheda to conduct the College opened there by the Blessed Oliver Plunket. On 8th October, 1672, he was appointed Superior of the Mission. A fresh outburst of persecution caused the closing of our schools, and the ordinary ministrations of the Society had to be carried on in secret. During Fr Rice's term of office the Irish College of Poitiers was founded as a house of refuge for old, infirm, or exiled missioners. Before leaving office he wrote a long report on the work of the Society in Ireland from 1669 to 1675. At the time of Oates's pretended Plot (1678) he was arrested and banished. He went to Poitiers, and acted as Minister of the Irish College till 1682, when he returned to Limerick. After the surrender of Limerick he came to Dublin, as Consultor of the Mission, and died there on 7th January, 1699.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Stephen Rice SJ 1625-1699
Stephen Rice was born in Dingle in 625. Educated at our school in Kilkenny, he entered the noviceship there in 1648. Ordained at Louvain in 1660, the year of the Restoration of Charles II, he was stationed first at Limerick, then at New Ross, in which town he taught school for seven years.

At the request of Blessed Oliver Plunkett he opened a school in Drogheda, where he had 150 pupils, besides 40 Protestant gentlemen who attended classes in 1670.

Two years later he was made Superior of the Mission. During the disturbance caused by the Titus Oates Plot, he went to Poitiers, where he acted as Minister.

However, in 1682 he managed to return to Ireland and he worked in Limerick. After the surrender of that city to the Williamites he came to Dublin as Consultor of the Mission, and he died there in January 7th, 1699.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
RICE, STEPHEN, began his Noviceship at Kilkenny, and in the sequel became a leading man amongst his Brethren. The venerable Primate Archbishop Plunkett, of glorious memory,* in a letter addressed from Dublin on the 22nd of November, 1672, to the General S. J. Father John P. Oliva, extols Father Rice then Superior of his brethren, for his learning, disinterested and indefatigable zeal, fervid eloquence, remarkable discretion, and profound religious virtue; he adds, that this good Father has all the modest diffidence of a Novice: that he is a true son of St. Ignatius, and full of the spirit of the Institute. In a second letter to the same, dated Armagh, 30th of January, 1673, the worthy Archbishop repeats his unqualified commendation of this meritorious Father. His Grace of Dublin, Archbishop P. Talbot, held him in no less esteem. We have this Rev. Superior’s well written report of the Irish Mission of the Society, from the year 1669 to the 15th of July, 1675, and which has furnished several details for these biographical Sketches. I find by a letter dated Poitiers, 20th of May, 1097, that he was thus recommended by its Rector, F. Kelly, to the General Gonzales, to resume the Government of his Brethren in Ireland : “Rev. Father Stephen Rice, who, about 20 years since, was Superior of the Mission, appears to me eminently qualified to fill that office again, unless his age and strength may incapacitate him for the labour”. When the good old man descended into the tomb, I have inquired in vain.

  • The head of this illustrious victim of legal murder, is respectfully preserved in the Convent at Drogheda. How true is the remark, that “Calumny spread, no matter how, will frequently prove an Overmatch for candour, truth, and innocence, until time has applied his Touchstone, and proved the temper of the Metal!”

Roche, Ignatius, d 1639, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2057
  • Person
  • d 26 November 1639

Born: County Wexford
Entered: c 1703, Salamanca, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained:
Died: 26 November 1639, Monterey, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1726-1729 Superior of Irish Mission
1730 Rector of Poitiers

Writes from Waterford 08 January 1734 and 25 May 1739

A Book of the old Waterford Library SJ read “Ign Roche SJ” 1739

Roche, John, 1670-1718, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2059
  • Person
  • 10 July 1670-10 July 1718

Born: 10 July 1670, County Cork
Entered: 07 September 1687, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 1699, Paris, France
Final Vows: 15 August 1703
Died: 10 July 1718, La Flèche, France - Franciae Province (FRA)

Alias de la Roche

MA of Poitiers of Bourges (at entry?)
1693 At Compiègne College FRA
1711-1718 At Amiens teaching Humanities, Rhetoric, Philosophy and Theology
“...whose whole life devolved to the teaching of literature and the higher studies of Philosophy and Theology offers nothing but an almost scrupulous fidelity to the accomplishment of all his duties. Weak health required his Superiors to withdraw him to La Flèche.”
Also known to work as a confessor, visiting the poor, sick and prisoners, He enlisted his students in all of his good works.
(Guillaume Astana, Franc II p 43)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already studied Philosophy before Ent 07 September 1687 Paris
After First Vows he was sent for Regency to Nevers, La Flèche, Compiègne and Arras, and after that sent for Theology to Paris where he was Ordained 1699
After his studies were completed he was sent to teach Philosophy at Moulins for two years, and then he made Tertianship at Rouen.
1703-1712 He spent the next nine years teaching Philosophy at Amiens, La Flèche and Paris.
1712 Then he was sent to La Flèche for a Chair in Theology, and he remained there until his death 10 July 1718
Just before his death he had been invited by the General to join the Irish Mission

Routh, Bernard, 1695-1768, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2073
  • Person
  • 12 February 1696-18 January 1768

Born: 12 February 1696, Guttermanstein, Alsace, Germany
Entered: 01 October 1716, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 04 May 1727, Paris, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1734, La Flèche
Died: 18 January 1768, Mons, Belgium - Franciae Province (FRA)

1730 At College of Bourges FRA teaching Humanities, Rhetoric and Philosophy. Is a Doctor of Arts
1736-1737 Vice Rector Irish College Poitiers (enters himself as “Hibernus”)
1743 At College of Paris, Scriptor
1757-1761 At Professed House Paris
“A man of distinguished talent, highly proficient in all subjects - fit to write or transact business”

Remark in details of Thomas Ronan :
“Bernard Routh says he was born in France of Irish parents (MS p99 and Exaten Vol V p75) - does this refer to Ronan or Routh himself??, as he was born abroad himself at Speyer Dioc is mentioned first beside Ronan”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Perhaps a relative of his fellow Irishman Dr Routh (cf “Biographe Universelle” and Webb’s “Irish Biography”)
A Historian; A Critic; Professor of Irish College Poitiers
Converted Montesquieu (principle source of the theory of separation of powers)
One of the writers of the “Journal de Trécoux” from 1734-1743 (cf about 10 of his books in de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ” under Routh and Mareuil)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Capt William Rothe Kilkenny, and Margaret née O’Dogherty
Had studied at Irish College Poitiers before Ent 01 October 1716 Paris
1718-1724 After First Vows he was sent to La Flèche for Philosophy and then for Regency to Compiègne.
1724-1728 He was then sent to Collège Louis le Grand Paris for Theology, and was ordained there c 1727
1728-1732 After Theology he was sent to Bourges for studies and graduated D Phil, continuing on there to teach.
1732-1736 Sent to teach Philosophy at La Flèche
1736-1738 Rector of Irish College Poitiers.
1738 Over the previous decade his tastes had been developing for literature and he had now some half dozen books to his credit. He was now recalled to Paris and until the dissolution of the Society in France devoted himself to Letters. He was a friend of Charles de Montesquieu, whom he reconciled on his death-bed to the Church.
He died at Mons, France 18 January 1768 and his published works are listed in Somervogel
In spite of his birth abroad, he was regarded by his Irish and French contemporaries as Irish. His name was proposed amongst those of Irish Jesuits abroad for nomination to the Irish Mission and it had even been suggested that Routh should be made Superior of the Irish Mission.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Routh, Bernard
by Patrick M. Geoghegan

Routh, Bernard (1695–1768), Jesuit in France and confessor to Montesquieu, was born 11 February 1695 at Godramstein, Alsace, France, son of Capt. William Rothe, soldier, and Margaret Rothe (née O'Dogherty). From an early age he decided on a career in the priesthood and, after being educated at the Collège des Jésuites Irlandais in Poitiers, he entered (1 October 1716) the Society of Jesus. He studied at La Flèche, then at Compiègne, and finally at the Jesuit college in Paris. An excellent scholar and poet, in 1725 he published ‘Ode à la reine’, in a collection of poems to celebrate the marriage of King Louis XV. He taught at Bourges until 1732 and after that at La Flèche. Ordained a priest (1734), he expressed a preference for the Irish mission and was appointed rector of the Irish college at Poitiers (1736). He loved teaching and revelled in his role as a professor; around this time he also began publishing works on philosophy and theology which would help establish him as one of the leading literary figures in France. His Recherches sur la manière d'inhumer des anciens á l'occasion des tombeaux de civaux en Poitou (1738) was hailed as an important dissertation and displayed much insight and erudition. The Jesuits were impressed with his scholarship, and in 1739 he was summoned to Paris to serve on the editorial staff of the Journal de Trévoux (1739–43). In 1748 he was asked by the Jesuits to visit the Austrian court to represent the Irish catholics.

It was in 1755 that Routh achieved notoriety throughout Europe. The philosopher Montesquieu had contracted a terminal fever and asked for a confessor. The Jesuit Castel was chosen and he, in turn, sent for Routh, who already knew the dying man. Montesquieu decided to make his final confession to Routh, who insisted on permission to publish an account of the proceedings afterwards. Before administering the final sacrament, Routh interrogated Montesquieu about his attitude to the catholic church and its beliefs and demanded a pledge of public conformity in the event of his recovery. Routh remained with Montesquieu for five days in order, as he later said, to assist him on the path to devotion. According to Madame d'Aiguillon, Routh also bullied Montesquieu into handing over all his private papers; while this is disputed, it is clear that Routh had been ordered by his superiors to secure a literary repentance. Routh's treatment of Montesquieu in his final days was the subject of much criticism and was seized on by opponents of the Jesuits and the church.

When the Society of Jesus was suppressed in France in 1764, Routh settled at Mons in the Austrian Netherlands (Belgium), where he was asked to become confessor of the Princess Charlotte de Lorraine. This was his final role before his death on 18 January 1768 at Mons.

James Roche, Critical and miscellaneous essays by an octogenarian (1850), i, 28; O. R. Taylor, ‘Bernard Routh et la mort de Montesquieu’, French Studies, iii (1949), 101–21; Robert Shackleton, Montesquieu: a critical biography (1961); Francis Finegan, ‘The Irish college of Poitiers, 1674–1762’, IER, civ (1965), 30; ODNB

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Bernard Routh SJ 1695-1768
Fr Bernard Routh was a relative of David Roth, Bishop of Ossory, and was born in Ireland on February 11th 1695. He was sent to France in his youth and was educated at the Irish College in Poitiers. On the completion of his studies, he became a Jesuit in 1716.

He taught at Poitiers, where he became noted for his learning and critical talents. He was author of numerous works and editor of a paper in Paris. On the Suppression of the Society in 1762, there were about three thousand Jesuits to be provided for. King Stanislaus provided a refuge for twenty Jesuits in his Duchy of Lorraine. He was one of those who attended Montesquieu in his last moments. The statement he unjustly secured for himself some of that great man’s manuscripts is said in the Biographie Generale to be without foundation. The same dictionary enumerates his works, the principal of which appears to have been “Recherches sur a manière d’Inhumer les Anciens en Poitou” (1738), said to be a rare and interesting memoir.

He died at Mons on January 18th 1768 aged 62.

Sarsfield, John, 1599-1623, Jesuit scholastic

  • IE IJA J/2090
  • Person
  • 1599-22 July 1623

Born: 1599, County Cork
Entered: 17 May 1620, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaine Province (AQUIT)
Died: 22 July 1623, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaine Province (AQUIT)

Studied Rhetoric and Philosophy
1622 In Irish College Poitiers Age 23
1623 At Bordeaux in 1st year Theology Age c22 Soc 3

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1621 Sent to Bordeaux for studies

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had previously graduated MA at Bordeaux before Ent 17 May 1620 Bordeaux
1622 After First Vows he remained in Bordeaux for theology. He showed promise of exceptional brilliance in Theology, but contracted consumption there and died 22 July 1623

Shee, Thomas Patrick, 1673-1735, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2115
  • Person
  • 16 September 1673-01 January 1735

Born: 16 September 1673, County Kilkenny
Entered: 02 october1692, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: 14 April 1705, Collegium Buntruti, Porrentruy, Switzerland
Final Vows: 02 February 1708 Ensisheim
Died: 01 January 1735, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Taught Humanities and Rhetoric. Talent and proficiency above mediocrity. Capable of teaching, of Mission work, of being Superior.
1714 Teaching at College of Sées CAMP
1714-1722 At Episcopal University Strasbourg teaching Humanities, Philosophy and Theology and was an MA
1723 CAMP Catalogue “de Schée” at Bar-le-duc College teaching. On Mission 1 year
1724-1732 Rector of Irish College Poitiers
1733-1735 AT Irish College Poitiers in infirm health

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1728 Rector and Procurator at Irish College Poitiers
His name was O’Shee, perhaps he is the Capt Thomas Shee of Butler’s infantry, who imitated the example of Captain Clinch - that Captain was from Kilkenny and was attainted c 1716

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had begun Priestly studies, probably at Paris before Ent 02 October 1692 Paris
1694-1695 After First Vows he did a year of Rhetoric at Paris
1695-1697 He was sent to CAMP for Philosophy to Pont-à-Mousson
1697-1702 He then spent seven years of Regency teaching Rhetoric at Charleville and Chaumont
1702-1705 He was then sent to Rheims for Theology and he was Ordained there 14 April 1705
1706-1714 His ability in Philosophy and Theology was noted, and so he taught Philosophy for eight years in various Colleges ending at Dijon.
1714-1723 Sent From Dijon to take a Chair in Moral Theology at Strasbourg. In the last year he was also Spiritual Father.
1723-1732 He was sent to the Irish College Poitiers, and became Rector in 1724. Because of earlier mismanagement, the finances of the Colleges were in a chaotic state, but Thomas managed to keep the College in existence and was even able to carry out improvements to the buildings. He remained at Poitiers after finishing as Rector and he died there 01 January 1735

Taylor, Nicholas J, 1644-1678, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2177
  • Person
  • 26 March 1644-26 June 1678

Born: 26 March 1644, Dublin
Entered: 15 October 1663, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained: c 1676
Died: 26 June 1678, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Franciae Province (FRA)

1668-1669 Teaching Humanities at Hesdin in France
1672 At Compiègne College FRA MA Good talent. Teaching Grammar and Humanities
1675 At La Flèche studying Theology teaching Humanities and Rhetoric
1678 Tallier went from FRA to new Irish College at Poitiers AQUIT
1678 a Fr Ignatius Tailor dies at Poitiers 26 June 1678

Thaly, Hugh, 1639-1711, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2180
  • Person
  • 10 November 1638-18 September 1711

Born: 10 November 1638, Kilmore, County Cavan
Entered: 20 September 1659, Nancy, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)
Ordained: 12 March 1671, Pont-à-Mousson, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1677
Died: 18 September 1711, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)

Alias Johnson

1662-1664 At Pont-á-Mousson studying Logic and Physics
1664-1666 At Charlevile College teaching
1666-1667 At Langres College
1667-1668 At Dijon College teaching
1668-1672 At Pont-à-Mousson Studying Theology and then teaching and Prefect of Physicists, later Seminarians
1672 At Rheims College CAMP teaching Humanities and Rhetoric. Good teacher and fit for teaching and Mission
1699 Came to Poitiers and remained. Minister, Rector (1700-1705)
1708 Catalogue Strength good considering his age, but is wholly blind
In Convent OSF at Waterford there is a book with “Resid New Ross ex domo, Rev Hugionis Thalii”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
“Insignis juventutis instructor” up to his old age; Professor of Belles-lettres, Rhetoric and Philosophy for twenty-five years
Rector of Poitiers and Drogheda; Served two years in hospitals
1683 In Dublin
1686 In Drogheda
1708 In Poitiers
He was totally blind for the last eight years of his life; Twenty-four years in Ireland, and some years in Scotland; A holy man (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan :
1661-1664 After First Vows was sent to Pont-à-Mousson for Philosophy.
1664-1648 He spent four years Regency at Charleville, Langres and Divonne.
1648-1671 He then returned to Pont-à-Mousson for Theology and was Ordained there 12 March 1671
1672-1673 Made Tertianship at Nancy
1673-1676 Sent to Ireland and Drogheda
1676-1677 He was then sent to France, to the newly founded Irish College of Poitiers, but seems to have quarrelled there with the Rector, Ignatius Browne over the administration of the College, and was recalled to Ireland by the Mission Superior William O’Rian the following year.
1677 Sent to work at Dublin Residence.
1678 During the Oates's Plot he was living outside Dublin. The General was not happy about Thaly remaining on the Mission and, on the suggestion of O’Rian, himself exiled in Poitiers, the General recalled him to France but Thaly managed to evade the order until the General's death, in spite of many expressed wished by the Mission Consultors. The cause of the difficulties are not clear, though it can be assumed that he was seen as something of a trouble maker, and that some of the difficulties in the early days at Poitiers had been attributed to him. It is thought that he was being sent to CAMP to have some time to reflect.
The new General left him undisturbed, after a suitable caution, and Thaly proved himself a resourceful organiser at the School and Residence of Drogheda, including managing to get a suitable building for an oratory.
During the short lived reign of James II, he began to dabble a little in politics. He got himself into trouble over the as one of the chief witnesses of the Chief Revenue Commissioner, Thomas Sheridan, who had been accused of corruption. Sheridan’s allies suggested that Thaly was merely a “job-hunter” for his own family and friends.
At the same time, he managed to get the General to appoint a French Jesuit as Chaplain to the Viceroy, and when he did not turn up, Thaly installed himself as Viceregal Chaplain in Dublin Castle. The General became very concerned by Thaly’s behaviour, especially his part in the Sheridan case,, and the Mission Superior was instructed that Thaly should never again be allowed to live in Dublin.
So he went to work in Drogheda, but served as a Chaplain at the Siege of Limerick. After the Williamite victory, he was forced to seek shelter in Dublin, where he exercised his ministry under the name “Johnson” until 1699, when he was captured and deported to France.
1700-1705 Rector at Irish College Poitiers. During his administration were sown the seeds of future disputes between the Irish Mission and the College over the funds which supported the College but in part belonged to the Mission. He died at Poitiers 18 September 1711

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Hugh Thaly 1638-1711
Fr Hugh Thaly was a great scholar and instructor of youth in Dublin and elsewhere, was born about 1638 and died at Poitiers on September 18th 1711.

He laboured on the Irish Mission for 24 years and for some time also in Scotland. During the last eight years of his life, like the good Tobias, he was totally blind, and exhibited, as he died, the most perfect patience and resignation.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
THALY,HUGH. This polite scholar and excellent instructor of youth, died in the Irish College of Poitiers, on the 18th of September, 1711, aet. 73. He had laboured in the Irish Mission for 24 years, and for some time had been employed in the vineyard of Scotland. For the last eight years of his life, God was pleased to visit him with total blindness; but, like another Tobias, he exhibited perfect patience and resignation.

Ussher, Stephen, 1701-1762, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2199
  • Person
  • 22 June 1701-10 January 1762

Born: 22 June 1701, Dublin
Entered: 09 November 1718, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1731, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1736, Dublin
Died: 10 January 1762, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Alias Nevill

Grandnephew of John Ussher - RIP 1698

Family had provided two Bishops in Ireland : Anglican Bishop Henry Ussher and Anglican Primate James Ussher

1720 First Vows 11 November 1720 at Pau AQUIT
1720-1723 Philosophy and Theology in AQUIT
1727 At Luçon Seminary under the name of “Neville” teaching Grammar, Humanities and Rhetoric
1727-1732 At Irish College Poitiers studying Theology and in charge of Boarders
1732-1733 Tertianship at Marennes AQUIT
1734-1745 Stephe Neville (vere Usher) is on Irish Mission. Usher is mentioned in Richard Kirwan’s letters (1750-1754) as at Poitiers. He also metions F Reilly and F Cahill as connected with that house.
1745-1751 Rector at Irish College Poitiers
1752 Rector At Irish College Rome
1755-1762 Rector Irish College Poitiers with Thomas Brennan Minister, Thomas Gorman Operarius and William Nowlan Temp Coadjutor

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Three Entries (1&2) Stephen Ussher; (3) Stephen Nevill

(1&2) Stephen Ussher
DOB Ireland; Ent c 1739 Rome or AQUIT (in pen); RIP 1762

1752 In Rome having come 16 October 1751 (in pen)

“Arret de la Cour” says : “Etienne Ussher of the Irish College, Poitiers, died February 10, 1762”

(1) Stephen Nevill
DOB probably Cork; Ent c 1720 AQUIT;

1728 AT Irish College Poitiers in 2nd year Divinity. (CAT of Irish College Poitiers)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
DOB 22 June 1701 Dublin; Ent 09/11/1718 Bordeaux; Ord 1731 Poitiers; RIP 10/01/1762 Poitiers

Son of Patrick and Elizabeth née Creagh (or Nulty?), and grandnephew of John

He had a classical education at Irish College Poitiers before Ent 09 November 1718 Bordeaux

1720-1733 After First Vows he was sent for studies to Pau. He then was sent for four years Regency to AQUIT Colleges, after which he was sent to Grand Collège Poitiers for Theology, and he was Ordained there 1731.
1733-1746 He was sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence, becoming the Superior there in 1736. During this time he also served as a Curate at Mary's Lane Chapel.
1746-1751 Sent as Rector to Irish College Poitiers
1751-1754 Rector of Irish College Rome being replaced 14 June 1754
1754 Sent back to Poitiers to act as Rector again. He died in Office a few weeks before the dispersal of the community due to the dissolving of the Society in France 10 January 1762

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
USHER, STEPHEN. With regret I have to admit that I have barely recovered his name.

Wesley, John, 1662-1721, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2238
  • Person
  • 06 March 1662-20 March 1721

Born: 06 March 1662, County Kildare
Entered: 07 September 1682, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1691, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1700
Died: 20 March 1721, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Studied Philosophy and Theology 7 years in Society
1689-1694 At Irish College Poitiers studying Theology
1694-1695 At Bordeaux on Tertianship
1695-1696 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar - had a talent for Mathematics and History
1697-1698 At Tulles teaching Logic and Physics. Consultor.
1698-1705 At La Rochelle teaching Grammar and Operarius. Prefect of studied and Casuist (1702-1703) and Professor of Lower Schools
1705-1709 At Irish College Poitiers, Minister and Procurator
1711-1716 At La Rochelle, prefect and teaching Humanities, Philosophy and Moral Theology
1717-1718 At Irish College Poitiers
1718-1720 At Fontenoy College, Prefect and again at Poitiers as Minister
1720-1721 At Irish College Poitiers teaching Grammar, Humanities and Philosophy. Prefect of Higher School. Has good judgement and is modest and grave. Tenacious of his own opinion

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica”
There are two very similar Entries (1) John Clare and (2) John Wesley - which follow one another
(1) John Clare
DOB 1662 Kilkenny; Ent 07 September 1682; RIP post 1685
Mentioned in ANG Catalogue 1685 (when he was in Liège, which was ANG, where Wesley was); Left Ireland in 1684
(1) John Wesley
DOB 1662 Leinster; Ent 07 September 1682; RIP post 1717
Professor of Philosophy
1708 Procurator of Irish College Poitiers (in pencil)
1717 At Irish College Poitiers
Mentioned in ANG Catalogue 1685 (when he was in Liège, which was ANG, and Clare is said to be the same) and is called “Wisely, a Kildare name, and the dates 1660 and 07 September 1683 are given (presumably as DOB and Ent?)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1684-1692 After First Vows he was sent for studies to Liège and then Grand Collège Poitiers (AQUIT) where he was Ordained 1691
1692-1696 After studies were completed he made Tertianship, and was then sent to teach Humanities at Fontenay.
1696-1698 He was sent to teach Philosophy at Tulle.
1698-1706 He was then appointed Prefect of Studies at la Rochelle
1706-1710 He was then sent as Procurator to Irish College Poitiers
1710-1716 He was sent back to La Rochelle as Prefect of Studies.
1716 He was sent as Minister to Irish College Poitiers, and he died there 20 March 1721
Wesley always kept up an interest in the Irish Mission. And from the cryptic correspondence of the period we can deduce that he had come into an inheritance which he wished to be devoted to a Jesuit mission in Kildare. But in 1708 the time was not appropriate for such a venture.

White, James, 1660-1722, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2246
  • Person
  • 28 September 1660-05 October 1722

Born: 28 September 1660, An Daingean, County Offaly
Entered: 08 March 1680, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: c 1685, Salamanca, Spain
Final Vows: 28 August 1693
Died: 05 October 1722, St Ignatius College, Valladolid, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)

1690 At Logroño CAST teaching Philosophy
1715-1716 Prefect at Irish College Poitiers (With, Witus)
1720 A St Ignatius College Valladolid, Operarius
Was a Doctor of Divinity, taught Grammar, Philosophy and Theology 19 years

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1703-1709 At Salamanca
1721 At Valladolid
He was in CAST when Hugh Thaly, in a letter of 20 February 1686 earnestly requests that he be sent to the Irish Mission
A letter of his in 1720 is preserved at Salamanca.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Patrick and Isabel née Wafer
Born Sragh, near Philipstown
Had studied at Santiago and begun Theology at Salamanca before Ent 08 March 1680 Villagarcía
1682-1686 After First Vows he was sent on a brief Regency and then to Royal College Salamanca for Theology where he was was Ordained c 1685
1686-1696 After his Tertianship representations were made to have him sent back to the Irish mission but his Spanish superiors, who appreciated White's exceptional ability, detained him. So he was sent to teach at Logroño and then to take a Chair in Theology at Valladolid
1696-1711 He was sent to Compostella, where he held a Chair in Theology and graduated DD
1711-1720 Because there was some dispute between the Cathedral Chapter and the University (where he was teaching) he returned to Valladolid again to a Chair of Theology.
1720 He resigned from teaching and was sent as Operarius to the Jesuit Church at Valladolid where he died 05 October 1722

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
WHITE, JAMES, was in the Province of Castile, in the early part of 1686, as I find in F. Hugh Thaly’s letter of the 20th of February that year. His services were then urgently demanded for the Irish Mission.