Hungary

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Hungary

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Hungary

7 Name results for Hungary

2 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Crowe, Patrick, 1925-2017, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/826
  • Person
  • 05 March 1925-04 July 2017

Born: 05 March 1925, Edenderry, County Offaly
Entered: 07 September 1943, St Mary's, Emo, County Laois
Ordained: 31 July 1957, Milltown Park, Dublin
Professed: 02 February 1961, Clongowes Wood College
Died 04 July 2017, Cherryfield Lodge, Dublin

Part of the Clongowes Wood College, Naas, County Kildare community at the time of death.

Early education at Clongowes Wood College SJ

by 1977 at St Ignatius College Prep San Francisco CA, USA (CAL) Sabbatical

◆ Jesuits in Ireland : https://www.jesuit.ie/news/paddy-crowe-sj-a-quality-educator/

Paddy Crowe SJ – a quality educator
Paddy Crowe SJ died peacefully on Tuesday morning, 4 July, in the wonderful care, love and compassion of the staff at Cherryfield Lodge Nursing Home, Milltown Park, Dublin 6. At his funeral mass in Milltown Park Chapel on 6 July, former community member and friend Bruce Bradley SJ gave the homily. He was buried in the Community Cemetery in Clongowes, Clane, Co. Kildare.

Born on 5 March 1925 in Edenderry, Co Offaly, Paddy was the oldest boy in a large family. He was educated at Clongowes Wood College SJ in Co Kildare before entering the Society of Jesus in 1943. Early on, it was thought he would make a good professor of philosophy, but he had a more active interest in schools. He soon found himself working in education under various roles. At Clongowes Wood College SJ, for example, he became teacher, prefect, rector, and eventually headmaster.

He served as Director of Education Policy and Education Delegate for the Irish Province and worked at several other schools, including Crescent College SJ and Mungret College SJ in Co Limerick, and Belvedere College SJ, Gonzaga College SJ, and Greendale School in Dublin. Referring to his personality, Fr Bradley said: “He was an extrovert and had such a sense of humour. He was bravely adventurous, who loved to travel, have new experiences and make new friends”.

“Educational value,” Paddy said once, “is based largely on personal contact of good people with the young.” Fr Bradley, who worked with him for many years, noted: “In all the schools where he served, he was demanding and firm, but fair. He lived in the continual tension between the old and the new, always reading, questioning, and seeking to move on”.
One of his former students commented: “You always knew where you stood with Fr Crowe”.

Paddy was consultant to Fényi Gyula Jesuit High School, the only Jesuit school in Hungary, founded in 1994. He was heavily involved in the University of Scranton (USA) Scholarship Scheme, which led in time to his honorary doctorate in education, of which he was justly proud.

Later from 1998 to 2009, he returned to Clongowes where he lived among his Jesuit community; acted as spiritual father for students; assisted in a local parish and ministered to the Holy Family Sisters. His mind remained very alert as his physical health deteriorated. As one friend said of him: “He was a great man to have a conversation with but a terrible man to play scrabble with”. He also retained a great interest in computers and loved using up-to-date devices.

His passing is deeply regretted by his family, Jesuit companions, friends, former colleagues and his many students, some of whom posted warm tributes on Facebook. Fr Bradley concluded: “As Paddy arrives at last at the father’s house, we can rejoice with him and for him. Paddy, go without fear. Amen”.

Early Education at Edenderry NS; Knockbeg College, Carlow; Clongowes Wood College SJ

1945-1948 Rathfarnham - Studying Arts at UCD
1948-1951 Tullabeg - Studying Philosophy
1951-1953 Crescent College SJ, Limerick - Regency : Teacher
1953-1954 Clongowes Wood College SJ - Regency : Teacher; Third Line Prefect; Studying for CWC Cert in Education
1954-1958 Milltown Park - Studying Theology
1958-1959 Rathfarnham - Tertianship
1959-1960 Clongowes Wood College SJ - Lower Line Prefect; Teacher
1960-1965 Mungret College SJ - Prefect of Studies; Teacher
1965-1976 Clongowes Wood College SJ - Prefect of Studies; Teacher
1968 Rector
1971 Headmaster
1976-1977 St Ignatius Prep. San Francisco, CA, USA - Sabbatical
1977-1978 Loyola House - Province Special Secretariat
1978-1979 University Hall - Vice Superior; Province Special Secretariat; Director Province Education Policy
1979-1984 Belvedere College SJ - Working in Education; Director Province Education Policy
1980 Headmaster; Teacher; Education Delegate; Colloquium
1984-1987 Campion House - Education Delegate; Director Colloquium
1985 Manager Gonzaga College SJ; Chair Board Gonzaga College SJ; Vice-Superior
1987-1992 Loyola House - Superior; Education Delegate; Director Colloquium
1990 Central Province Admin; Asst Education Delegate; Chair Board Gonzaga College SJ
1992-1995 Clongowes Wood College SJ - Rector; Provincial Team
1995-1998 Belvedere College SJ - Principal of Junior School
1997 Chair Board Cherryfield Lodge
1998 - 2017 Clongowes Wood College SJ - Assists in Clane Parish of St Patrick & St Brigid
1999 Chair Board of Greendale School, Kilbarrack, Dublin
2001 Spiritual Father to Third Line
2006 Ministry to Holy Family Sisters, Clane, Co Kildare
2009 Prays for the Church and the Society at Cherryfield Lodge

FitzGerald, Richard, 1624-1678, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1294
  • Person
  • 25 November 1624-09 March 1678

Born: 25 November 1624, Vienna, Austria
Entered: 1640, Vienna, Austria - Austriacae Province (ASR)
Ordained: 1655, Rome, Italy
Professed: 01 November 1658
Died: 09 March 1678, Vienna, Austria - Austriacae Province (ASR)

Alias Geraldine

Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Born of illustrious Irish parents
Writer; Professor of Theology and Philosophy (cf Balthazar Geraldini in de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”)

Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
After First Vows studied Rhetoric and Philosophy at Vienna. He was so talented that he was chosen to make a public defence of his Philosophical theses.
He then went on Regency to Tyrnau and Sopron (now in Hungary)
Then he went to the Roman College for Theology, showing outstanding ability, and was Ordained there 1655 and graduated D Phil
He then held a Chair of Philosophy at Vienna and also taught Theology there and later at Munich
1671-1674 Rector at Linz College
1674-1678 At Vienna until he died there 09/03/1678

Ladányi, László, 1914-1990, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1553
  • Person
  • 14 January 1914-23 September 1990

Born: 14 January 1914, Diósgyőr, Borsod, Miskolc, Hungary
Entered: 30 July 1936, Hungariae Province (HUN)
Ordained: 08 June 1946, Shanghai, China
Professed: 15 August 1952
Died: 23 September 1990, Canossa Hospital, Hong Kong - Sinensis Province (CHN)

Part of the Ricci Hall, Hong Kong community at the time of death

Transcribed HUN to ExOr; Applied ExOR to HK 1950
by 1949 came to Ricci Hall, Hong Kong (HIB) working 1949-1967

◆ Hong Kong Catholic Archives :
Veteran China Watcher
Father Laszlo Ladányi Dies

Father Laszlo Ladányi S.J., veteran China watcher died of lung cancer on 23 September 1990 at the Canossa Hospital, Hong Kong, aged 76 years.

Laszlo Ladányi was born in Hungary in 1914. He later graduated from the University of Budapest and he also received training in the violin at the Music Academy in Budapest. He entered the Society of Jesus at the age of 22 and arrived in Beijing, China in 1939. He was later transferred to Shanghai where he was ordained to the priesthood in 1946. In mid 1949, Fr. Ladányi came to Hong Kong and was appointed chaplain to university students at the Ricci Hall.

In 1953 Fr. Ladányi founded the China News Analysis (CNA) in Hong Kong, a weekly and later a fortnightly newsletter. Ever since then, he worked as Editor to this publication for the following 30 years. The main purpose of the CNA is to keep missionary circles informed of Mainland China’s developments. The CNA is widely subscribed by those who are interested in the Mainland China affairs.

In 1982, the editorship of the China News Analysis was passed over to the present team of Jesuit priests, but Fr. Ladnay was still deeply engaged in his China studies up to the time he was admitted to Hospital last month.

The funeral took place at 10am on 26 September with a Mass of the Resurrection concelebrated by his Jesuit confreres and friends at St. Margaret’s Church, Happy Valley, Hong Kong. He was buried in the St. Michael’s Catholic Cemetery.
Sunday Examiner Hong Kong - 5 October 1990

In Memory of Father Laszlo Ladany, S.J.
R.I.P.

On 23 September 1990, 9:35am, our beloved Father Ladányi left this world. My mother phoned me from Hong Kong, weeping, and informed me about his death. As soon as the news came, the Chinese Catholics in America passed the information round and all expressed their affection and remembrance of him, as well as their sorrow and prayer for him…

Father Ladányi was a Hungarian, ordained priest in China in 1946. When he was a missionary in China, he already had deep love for China. After mainland China was taken over by the Communists, he was expelled and sent to Hong Kong. He always wanted to be near China and so he stayed in Hong Kong and began his work there. Diligently, spending 40 years as one day, he studied the problem of China with total dedication. In this way, he worked silently for the Church in China to the end of his life.

He was an outstanding political observer. He had a unique understanding of the problem of China. No one could match him for penetrating understanding, foresight, the depth and width of his study in the problem of China. He was a gifted writer, scholar and commentator. He wrote many analyses about China and the present and past situation of the Church in China. His sources made his information very accurate, looking at the question from every angle and written with simple precision so that his Analysis became an essential source of information for others and had much authority. All the Embassies bought and used his China News Analysis for reference. Libraries throughout the world have his writings, which are of the greatest historical value.

But, we are not only commemorating his outstanding work or his life, but paying tribute to his heart which really understood, loved and sympathised with the Church in China - this heart was precious as gold and as bright and crystal-clear as water. This is what we most cherish today and find most worthy of remembrance. His clear and firm stand-point and views always harmonised with the spirit of the faithful Church in China. His sense of Justice, experience and solid knowledge of the facts, moved him to speak from a sense of Justice. He never left anything unsaid which he knew could be said and he always said everything without fear of human respect. He worked with dedication and spoke up for the faithful Church in China. His heart beat as one with the faithful Church in China. He was the intimate companion of the faithful Church in China, and the good understanding teacher and friend of the faithful Church in China.

In the 1950’s the Catholic Church in mainland China was severely crushed. Bishop Kung of Shanghai was arrested. Many priests and Catholics were imprisoned. Only a few Catholic had the chance to flee abroad. It was he, the good shepherd, who organised these exiled sheep, cared for them, gave them guidance in their spiritual life and helped them to keep their faith. When the Trappist Monastery in Yang Jai-ping was persecuted, some of the monks fled to Hong Kong. It was he, their spiritual brother, who consoled them and later helped them to build the monastery and restore their community life.

When my younger sister became very sick in Shanghai Prison, she was allowed to leave the prison for medical treatment and died a year later. It was father Ladányi who crossed to Kowloon during the night to console my sorrowful parents. It was he who always opened wide his arms to embrace with affection the suffering Chinese Catholics. In his simple office, he used to talk intimately with these exiled faithful so that they might enjoy the warmth of a family spirit.

When I arrived Hong Kong in 1979, I carried within myself all the wounds as well as a loving memory of the faithful Church in China. He said to me; “Write it down! Write it down as soon as possible!” I said reluctantly, “I have been imprisoned for so long, I don’t know how to write freely. Also, I have no experience in writing.” He said very earnestly: “Write! When you begin to write, as you go along, you will discover how to write!” So with his encouragement, I finished writing the book entitled “Catholic Children in the Labour Camp” within half a year.

I visited him in his office a number of times, listening to all he had to say. He spoke Mandarin perfectly, sometimes mixed with a few sentences of Cantonese. There was no difference of nationality between us. Sometimes when I saw him two hands trembling because of his sickness, I wanted to give him a helping hand but he always made every effort to arrange everything himself. Sometimes when I saw his desk was in disorder and wanted to put in order for him, he would said, “Not necessary. I am accustomed to it.” Yes, even if your desk was disordered, this would not affect your clear mind and thinking, nor your keen eye-sight. His tall, thin frame conveyed an impression of profound wisdom. His ageing face expressed the warm affection of his heart. It would not be easy to find another good missionary like him, an understanding priest!

Good-bye, Father Ladányi! Best wishes for your journey. The memory of you will never fade from our hearts. But now, your long journey, this important long journey, has made us in this world, think so much of you and your life.

You are another Father Lebbe, the glory of missionaries. May you still continue from Heaven, to protect the Church in China. Bless our faithful brothers and sisters who are still suffering now, who are crushed to the ground and are not understood! Bless those who are exiled in other countries, waiting for the mercy of God to re-establish the Church in China.
By Ho Hoi-ling from America
Sunday Examiner Hong Kong - 9 November 1990

◆ Biographical Notes of the Jesuits in Hong Kong 1926-2000, by Frederick Hok-ming Cheung PhD, Wonder Press Company 2013 ISBN 978 9881223814 :
He was a scholar who published many articles and books which include :
“The Catholic Church in China” (Freedom Press, New York 1987); “The Communist Part of China and Marxism : A Self-Portrait” (Hoover Institute Press, Stanford, 1988); “Law and Legality in China : The Testament of a China-Watcher” (Hurst, London, 1992).

His books are scholarly and influential to the study of modern and contemporary China.

Note from Alan Birmingham Entry
He was the Editor of the “Sunday Examiner” for almost 33 years (1957-1991). For more than twenty years he edited the English writings of László Ladányi in the “China News Analysis”

Meagher, Thomas, 1600-1640, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1740
  • Person
  • 1600-24 November 1640

Born: 1600, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 19 November 1618, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1630, Louvain, Belgium
Died: 24 November 1640, Ireland

Alias O’Meagher

Son of William Macarius and Catherine Butler. Father ordained a priest in 1616 (after mother’s death?) free from all clerical duties and supporting his family.
Thomas studied in Hungary, Ireland and Mechelen under Jesuits - 6 years at Mechelen before Entry
Fellow novice of St Jan Berchmans
Wrote a “MS Treatise de voto” which in in the Salamanca Library
1628 At Louvain, but not in 1633
1637 ROM Catalogue Teacher of Greek, Rhetoric and Poetry. Mediocre in all and fit to teach Humanities

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of William Macharius and Catherine née Butler. Following Catherine’s death (1615), William entered the Priesthood, and was Ordained 1616. He was exempted from duties to look after his family.
Thomas made his studies in Ireland and at Mechelen under the Jesuits before Ent there 19 November 1618 (Mechelen Novitiate Album).
He is named in a report of Robert Nugent to the General in 1640, as an eminent scholar, a pious and prudent man, well versed in Greek and Hebrew literature, and in sacred and profane history; A good Preacher.
Had prepared for the press a volume of “Inscriptions, concerning the heroes of the Old and New Testament”.
1640 Was sent with two companions to act as Chaplains in the Royal Army, and died of fever in the same year. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS; Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of William and Catherine née Butler
After First Vows he was sent for Philosophy to Louvain, and then in Regency showed himself a schoolmaster of ability. He returned to Louvain to study Theology and was Ordained there 1630
1630 Sent to Ireland. No account of his missionary career has survived but he was attracted by scriptural studies and was about to travel Belgium, 1640, to have a book-published when he was appointed Military Chaplain. He died that year in Ireland 24 November 1640
His father, William, on the death of his wife also became a priest

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MAC-GUIRE, THOMAS, (sometimes called Maccharius) was educated it seems in Flanders. F. Robert Nugent reports of him in 1640, that all the Consultors (assembled to consider his degree in the Society) agreed that F. Mac-Guire was a very superior classic scholar, well versed in Greek and Hebrew Literature, and in Sacred and profane History, and a good preacher; that he had ready for the press “a volume of inscriptions, concerning the Heroes of the Old and New Testament” that the work had been much commended by those who read it in Flanders, and prays permission for its publication there. About two months later. F. MacGuire was ordered, with FF. Michael Chamberlain, and Matthew Hartegan, to attend the Royal army. This fatiguing duty brought on Fever; and I find from a postscript of a letter of the said Superior, dated the 22nd of November, 1640, that he had just received intelligence that “this upright, learned, zealous and indefatigable Missionary”, had sunk under it.

Peifer, Johannes, 1860-1948, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1972
  • Person
  • 16 January 1860-17 November 1948

Born: 16 January 1860, Kanzem, Trier, Germany
Entered: 13 September 1880, Turnov Austria - Austriae Province (ASR)
Ordained; 1894
Final vows: 02 February 1896
Died: 17 November 1948, Manresa, Hawthorn, Melbourne, Australia - Australiae Province (ASL)

Transcribed ASR-HUN to HIB : 01 January 1901

◆ Immaculate Conception Church, Hawthorn, Australia 150 Celebrations : https://www.immaculateconceptionaust.com/150anniversary https://f695c25f-f64b-42f7-be8b-f86c240a0861.filesusr.com/ugd/347de3_02c13bd9e734450881fa4ce539b50d78.pdf

Fr Johannes (John) Peifer, a very special priest
Over 150 years, 23 Jesuits have served as Parish Priests at Hawthorn, two of them twice. Nearly one hundred have served as assistant priest, some briefly, some for decades, nine served as migrant chaplains and about forty lived in the community and largely did other works.
Fr Peifer was born in Germany in 1860 and entered the Austrian Province of the Jesuits in 1880. Ordained in 1894, he came to Australia shortly afterwards. After various ministries around the country, he spent 20 years at St Aloysius College in Sydney, then the last 24 years of his life in Hawthorn, where he actively engaged in sodality work and in sick calls. In the confessional his advice was sought by many in difficulties, and he was a well-known figure throughout Hawthorn. By young and old he was held in affectionate regard, and his death in November 1948, aged 88, deprived the Order of one of its oldest and most beloved priests.
Preaching the panegyric at his funeral, Archbishop Mannix said that his life would scarcely ever be written.
‘He was reticent and self-effacing to an extraordinary degree. Nobody ever thought of celebrating his birthday, because nobody knew it, and he did not tell. Jubilees were celebrated
by members of his own Order and by others, but there was no jubilee for Fr. Peifer, who told nobody the date of his ordination. He lived a comparatively unknown and unostentatious, but very full life, content to do God's work as it fell to his lot. Amongst his colleagues he was always genial and alert, and bubbled over with humour. In Hawthorn, continued the Archbishop, many homes will be desolate and many hearts will grieve because Fr. Peifer will be no longer amongst them to advise and console and sympathize. He spent most of his time in Sydney and Hawthorn. But I think it was in Hawthorn he found his real home and his most congenial work. He came to be regarded as almost a legend in Hawthorn. Everybody knew, respected and loved him, and it was a great sorrow to all when recently he had to retire from active work, when he could do no more than continue to pray for the work that he himself had done so much to promote.
Fr. Peifer was a great believer in the power of the written word. In going about his Hawthorn district he was in the habit of distributing Catholic Truth pamphlets in an unostentatious way. I am sure that many people owed their conversion to this gentle, hidden apostolate of Fr. Peifer. In his last days at Caritas Christi Hospice he was able to get up occasionally and go round amongst the patients in that great institution. With each one who was capable of reading he left a Catholic pamphlet.’
By a remarkable coincidence, while the Jesuits and their friends were celebrating the centenary of the coming of Austrian Jesuits to Australia in 1848, the last link with those heroic Jesuit pioneers should go to his reward in Hawthorn. Although Fr Peifer’s life will never be written, it is timely to remember this humble priest who served our church and the wider Hawthorn community so faithfully, during our 150th year.

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
John Peifer was a stout lithe man, very cheerful, and according to all who knew him, a holy priest He entered the Society, 13 September 1880, and did his regency at Kalocsa, Hungary, teaching French and being prefect of discipline. Theology studies were completed at Innsbruck, 1891-94 and tertianship at Lainzerstrasse, Vienna, 1894-95. He returned to Kalocsa, 1895-97, and then 1897-98, went to Szatmar, Hungary. He arrived in Adelaide. 5 December 1898 and worked the Norwood parish for some time.
With his transfer to the Irish province, he taught at Xavier College for a few years and then spent a long period, 1903-23, at St Aloysius' College, Milsons Point, teaching and working at the Star of the Sea Church. He was assigned to the parish of Hawthorn, 1923-48, where he was minister for ten years and directed various sodalities.
He was a well-liked member of the province His manner was charming, his demeanor always cheerful, his humility quite unassumed. Yet he was a man of sound learning, especially linguistically in the classical tongues, in French and in Hungarian, as well as in his native German He was much appreciated both at St Aloysius' College and at Hawthorn, and was the last survivor of the Austrian fathers.

Scharmer, Vincenz, 1858-1923, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/397
  • Person
  • 19 July 1858-23 January 1923

Born: 19 July 1858, Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria
Entered: 14 August 1879, Sevenhill, Australia - Austriaco-Hungaricae Province (ASR-HUN)
Final vows: 08 September 1890
Died: 23 January 1923, Xavier College, Kew, Melbourne, Australia

Transcribed : ASR-HUN to HIB 01 Janaury 1901

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
He was an Austrian Province Brother whom elected to stay with the Irish Fathers when they took responsibility for the Australian Mission in 1901.
1910 He was at Sevenhill
1912 He was at Xavier College, Kew, and he died in Melbourne 23 January 1923

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
Vincent Scharmer entered the Society at St Andra, 14 August 1879, and after vows worked as a carpenter at Kalocsa, Hungary He arrived in Adelaide, 13 December 1883, and, with Josef Conrath, went to the Northern Territory Mission, 24 January 1884. He worked as a builder and carpenter during his time in Australia, first at Rapid Creek, 188489, and then at the Daly River, 1890-99. He also performed whatever domestic duties were required, which included caring for the Aborigines and sacristan. He went to Sevenhill, 1899-10, and finally to Xavier College, Kew, 1910-23.
He was a man of powerful physique, and an excellent carpenter. He was most valuable building structures on the Northern Territory Mission and had a reputation among the Aborigines for proficiency in the use of firearms. He saved the mission station on one occasion from the attack of some Aborigines by firing over their heads.
He had a most picturesque and unusual personality. At Xavier College he was so good with finances that he saved the college large sums of money. He carried out every duty entrusted to him with great thoroughness and even combativeness, for which he was known as “the Old Watch Dog”. He had a rugged appearance and an iron will. in performing functions he cared not for anyone except superiors. Directions were carried out to the letter. He even refused entrance at the Xavier gates to the current mission superior, until his identity was made clear.
There was something of the Prussian drill-sergeant in him. He kept four cats for his cellars, and they were all drilled like dragoons. He did much business over the telephone, and hearing him issuing orders gave one an admiration for the interpretative powers of Australian tradesmen. He was not easy to understand, yet the goods always appeared at the college.
He was also a skilled mechanic, a strenuous worker, and orderly to the last degree. His somewhat dour character was enlivened by a grim kind of humour. He loved a joke. Despite increasing sickness, he continued working for as long as he could stand on his feet. He was, indeed, a true and faithful soldier. with genuine kind-heartedness and much generosity.

Note from Friedrich Schwarz Entry
Frederick Schwarz entered the Society 29 July 1874, and arrived in Adelaide with Josef Conrath and Vinzenz Scharmer, 13 December 1883.

Waldmann, Franz X, 1839-1922, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/433
  • Person
  • 25 November 1839-06 November 1922

Born: 25 November 1839, Pécs, Baranya, Hungary
Entered: 22 May 1864, Turnov, Austria (ASR)
Final vows: 08 December 1874
Died: 06 November 1922, St Aloysius, Sevenhill, Adelaide, Australia

Transcribed : ASR-HUN to HIB 01/01/1901

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
He was an Austrian Province Brother who elected to stay with the Irish Fathers when they took responsibility for the Australian Mission in 1901.
He spent almost all of his life in Australia at Sevenhill and died there 06 November 1922.

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
Francis Xavier Waldrnann entered the Society at Tyrnau, Austria, 22 May 1864, but finished the noviciate at Szathmar, where he worked as cook, sacristan and gardener. He left Vienna for Australia with Leo Rogalski, 3 December 1869, and arrived at Sevenhill on 5 April 1870, where he was cook, storekeeper, baker, and stonemason, for most of his life. His only time away from Sevenhill was 1884-89, at Georgetown, and 1897-98 at Norwood.
Waldmann was a fine craftsman, and a loving one, devoting what time he could find to his craft. His chief monument is the stone carving on the church at Sevenhill. He continued his work when he was very old, feeble and practically blind, working by the feel of the stone. His life was a long, holy and useful one.