Ghent

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Ghent

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Ghent

44 Name results for Ghent

44 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Adams, James, 1737-1802, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/867
  • Person
  • 03 November 1737-07 December 1802

Born: 03 November 1737, Ireland
Entered: 07 September 1756, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: c1767
Died: 07 December 1802, Dublin - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Hacon; Alias Spencer

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Author of some works.

◆ The English Jesuits 1650-1829 Geoffrey Holt SJ : Catholic Record Society 1984
Son of William and Anne or Sarah Spencer
Educated St Omer 1746-1755
1755-1756 Douai
Entered 07/09/1756 Watten
1761Bruges College
1763/4-1767 Liège, Theology
Ordained c 17671767-1768 Ghent, Tertianship
1768 St Aloysius College (Southworth, Croft, Leigh)
1769-1774 St Chad’s College, Aston
1774-1798 London
1798-1802 Dublin

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
ADAMS, JAMES, began his Noviceship at Watten, 7th September, 1756. In the sequel he taught a course of Humanities with distinguished credit at St Omer. After pursuing the quiet tenor of his way as a Missionary for many years, he retired to Dublin in the early part of August, 1802, and died there on the 7th of December, the same year, aged 65. He was the author of the following works :

  1. Early Rules for taking a Likeness. With plates, (from the French of Bonamici), 1 Vol. 8vo. pp. 59, London, 1792.
  2. Oratio Acadcmica, Anglice et Latins conscripta. Octavo, pp. 21, London, 1793.
  3. Euphonologia Linguae Anglicance, Latine et Gallice Scripta. (Inscribed to the Royal Societies of Berlin and London). 1 Vol. Svo. pp. 190, London, 1794. The author was honored with the thanks of the Royal Society, London.
  4. Rule Britannia, or the Flattery of Free Subjects paraphrased and expounded. To which is added, An Academical Discourse in English and Latin, 8vo. pp. 60, London, 1798.
  5. A Sermon preached at the Catholic Chapel of St. Patrick, Sutton Street, Soho Square, on Wednesday, the 7th of March, the Day of Public Fast. 8vo. pp. 34, London, 1798.
  6. The Pronunciation of the English Language Vindicated. 1 vol. 8vo. Edinburgh, 1799.

Q. Was F. Adams the author of the following works mentioned in the catalogue of the British Museum :

  1. The Elements of Reading, 12mo. London, 1791.
  2. The Elements of Useful Knowledge. 12mo. London, 1793.
  3. A View of Universal History. 3 vols. 8vo. London, 1795.
    From a letter of his friend John Moir, dated Edinburgh, 11th Nov. 1801, as well as its answer, it is obvious that the Father had it in contemplation to publish his Tour through the Hebrides. He had been much disgusted with the Tour of that “ungrateful deprecating cynic, Dr. Johnson”.

Ashton, John, 1742-1815, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/879
  • Person
  • 03 May 1742-04 February 1815

Born: 03 May 1742, Ireland
Entered: 07 September 1759, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: c1765
Died: 04 February 1815, Port Tobacco, Maryland, USA - Angliae Province (ANG)

Ent ANG read Theology for 4 years and sent to Marlyand from 1767. Age at death 73

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Sent to the Maryland Mission, where he arrived November 1767, and died there 04 February 1815 aged 73
Note from Ignatius Ashton Entry :
RIP post 1780 Maryland, USA
Probably a brother of John

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
ASHTON, JOHN, was born in Ireland on the 3rd of May, 1742 : was admitted in 1759 : was chiefly employed in the Maryland Mission, where death terminated his zealous labours on the 4th of February, 1815, aet. 73.

Baker, John, 1644-1719, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2283
  • Person
  • 30 March 1644-29 August 1719

Born: 30 March 1644, Madrid, Spain
Entered: 07 September1670, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 04 April 1678
Final Vows: 02 February 1688
Died: 29 August 1719, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1685 Missioner in the Hampshire disctrict
1692 Succeeded Christopher Grene as English Penitentiary at St Peter’s Rome (ANG CAT 1704 shows him still there)

He is named in several letters of ANG Mission Superior John Warner, written to Rome, and in one dated 14 June 1680, he informs the General that John Baker had escaped from England. (Father Warner’s Note and Letter-book)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BAKER, JOHN, admitted a novice at Watten 7th Sept 1670. He succeeded F. Christopher Green, July, 1692, in the office of Penitentiary in St. Peter s at Rome; and died at Watten, 29th Aug. 1719, at. 75.

Bramhall, Bernard, 1698-1772, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/947
  • Person
  • 15 August 1698-27 July 1772

Born: 15 August 1698, County Meath
Entered: 07 September 1721, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: c1734
Final Vows: 02 February 1739
Died 27 July 1772, London, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Baker

Studied at Ghent and St Omer
1727 Teaching Humanities and Philosophy at St Omer
1730 Teaching Syntax at St Omer
1763 was rector of London Mission referred also as Procurator
In ANG Catalogue 1723-1760

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
(1) Bernard Bramhall
Of distinguished talents, extreme industry and grave judgement. Taught Humanities and Philosophy at St Omer. Rector of St Ignatius College London. (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
(2) Bernard Baker
After teaching Humanities and Philosophy in Belgium, he was sent to England, and was Rector of St Ignatius College (London) for some time until 1766.
1722 He was Procurator in London and died there according to a mortuary bill 27 July 1772, but according to a list in the handwriting of William Strickland, of London, a good authority, in February 1773. The ANG Catalogue 1773 also names him as in London.
Richard Plowden, Rector at St Omer 1726, in a letter in the archives, calls him “an excellent scholar, extremely industrious and a grave, judicious man”.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BAKER, BERNARD, (vere Bramhall, Ball) was born in Ireland on the 16th of August, 1698, was admitted into the Society at the age of 23, and was raised to the rank of a Professed Father, on the 2nd of February, 1739. After teaching Humanities and Philosophy, he was sent to London, and was appointed Rector of his Brethren in the College of St. Ignatius, an office which he filled till December, 1762. He died in London on the 27th of July 1772 : but another account says February, 1773.

Butler, John, 1727-1786, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/978
  • Person
  • 08 August 1727-23 June 1786

Born: 08 August 1727, County Waterford
Entered: 07 September 1745, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 16 June 1753, Liège, Belgium
Final Vows: 1763
Died: 23 June 1786, Hereford, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Thompson

Younger Brother of Thomas RIP 1778 (ANG)

Taught at St Omer for 2 years
Missionary

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1778 Three Archbishops and twelve Bishops, the first President of the Parlement de Paris, and the French Foreign Minister, urged his promotion to the See of Limerick. The Propaganda objected to an ex-Jesuit, but the Pope named him. He wrote to his kinsman, the Archbishop of Cashel “I am determined to oppose such a design by every respectable means in my power” To the bishop of his “native diocese” he writes : “Cruel dilemma! All left me to do is to submit to the will of others. But please take particular notice that my submission and resignation are on this condition, that whenever the Society of Jesus be restored, I shall be at full and perfect liberty to enter the same, and retire again to my College, the seat of virtue and real happiness”.
When the Bull came he was at Cahir Castle, and was so distressed that he wrote to Archbishop Butler (of Cashel) : “I decline the preferred honour, because I really think myself incapable of fulfilling the duties of such a station in the Church”. (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Thomas, 8th Lord Cahir and Frances, daughter of Sir Theobald Butler
After First Vows he followed the usual formation and was Ordained at Liège 16 June 1753
1775 Went on Missionary work as a member of the ANG Province in England at Hereford
1778 Nominated to the vacant chair as Bishop of Limerick but declined, and he died at Hereford 20 June 1786

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father John Butler 1727-1786
John Butler, ninth Lord Cahir was born in 1727. Having completed his studies at St Omers, he renounced his title and possessions, and entered the English Province of the Society in 1745. He took charge of the little chapel at Hereford.

In 1778, his relative, Dr James Butler, Archbishop of Cashel, informed him that as the Society had been suppressed, three Archbishops and twelve Bishops of Ireland had sent a postulation to Rome, asking that he be promoted to the vacant See of Limerick. In total confusion, he refused the offer as being unworthy. However, the appointment was made, and at the instance of Dr Egan, Bishop of Waterford, Fr John consented, on the condition that if the Society was restored, he should be free to become a Jesuit once more. He travelled to Ireland and got as far as Cahir, and there, overcome once more by reluctance to take office, he resigned the bishopric, and retired to Hereford, where he died in 1786.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BUTLER, JOHN, son of Thomas,8th Lord Cahir,* by Frances, daughter of Sir Theobald Butler, was born on the 8th of August, 1727 : embraced the pious Institute of St. Ignatius in 1745 ; and was ordained Priest at Liege in 1753. This Rev Father lived to inherit the title of Lord Cahir, and died at Hereford on 20th of June, 1786. It is little known that this humble Jesuit was postulated for Episcopacy. The facts are as follow :
His kinsman, Dr. James Butler, Archbishop of Cashel, by letter dated Thurles, 7th of March, 1778, signified to him, that all the Prelates of Minister, except one, and many other Prelates of the kingdom had cast their eyes upon him, as the most worthy person to fill the See of Limerick, vacant by the death of Dr. (Daniel) Kearney - that he hoped his humility would not be alarmed : and that reading in their joint postulation the will of Almighty God, he would submit to the order of Providence, and resign himself to a burthen which the divine grace would render light to him and advantageous to the Diocese he was invited to govern. To this communication F. Butler returned the annexed answer :

Hereford, March 23, 1778.
Honoured Sir,
I received by the last Post your very friendly letter of the 7th inst. You will not easily conceive my confusion and uneasiness on reading its contents. How flattering soever the prospect of such an honourable Elevation may be, I should act a very bad part indeed, if I did not decline the proffer of such an important station, thoroughly conscious of my incapability, and want of every requisite quality to execute the duties of such an office. I therefore most earnestly beg, and by every sacred motive entreat you, and the other respectable Prelates, will entirely drop all application to his Holiness in behalf of my succeeding to the See of Limerick, as I am determined, by most cogent reasons, to oppose such a design by every respectful means in my power. I request the favor of you to convey in the most grateful and respectful manner, my sincerest thanks to all who have been pleased to entertain so favourable an opinion of me, and hope you will believe me to be, Hond. Sir,
Your most ---
John Butler.

The good Archbishop, in his reply, bearing the Cashell Post mark of April 4th, 1778, informs him that the Postulation had been sent to Rome that it was “backed by the signatures of three Archbishops and twelve Bishops of Ireland, by the Roman Catholic Peerage of Ireland, by the united letters of the Nuncios of Paris and Brussels, of the Archbishop of Paris, of the First President of the Parliament of Paris, and of Monsieur de Vergennes, Ministre des affaires etrangères, to Mousieur de Bernis; and to crown all, by the letters of your most worthy Prelate, Dr. Walraesley, in your favor”. His Grace conjures him “not to hesitate to make a sacrifice of his own private ease and tranquillity to promote more advantageously in a more exalted state, the glory of God, and the welfare of this poor and afflicted Church, and expresses a belief that, when the necessity of acquiesence is so manifest, the Rev. Father would never forgive himself for the fatal consequences that would ensue to Religion from his refusal. The whole of his Grace’s letter, is most earnest and moving; and to conquer the Father’s repugnance, he engaged Dr. Wm Egan, Bishop of Waterford and Lismore, to expostulate with him. He did so in the following beautiful letter :

Honoured Sir,
I have shared with my much esteemed friend, and respected Metropolitan, his Grace of Cashel, in the uneasiness which your letter gave him; and I must beg leave, both from my own inclination, and at his earnest request, to expostulate with you upon the subject of it. By letters which I have just received from Rome, there is no doubt left me of your being appointed to succeed in the See of Limerick, and that in a manner very honourable to you, and to us, notwithstanding a violent opposition as well in behalf of other Candidates, as on account of your particular circumstances. The Propaganda rejected you as an Ex-Jesuit, but his Holiness in attention to the earnest application, which the Prelates of this Province in particular, as well as others, thought it for the interest of Religion, to make in your favor, over-ruled the determination of the Propaganda, and named you. - All this seems to bespeak, that what we so anxiously engaged in, was conformable to the Will of God; He has been graciously pleased to bless with success our endeavours; we were influenced to employ them, from no other motive, than our persuasion, that your being of our Prelacy, would promote his holy service amongst us; the measure had the ardent wishes of all the respectable Catholicks of this kingdom for its success; I know from my Lord Cahir, that this was particularly wished for by him, and that it was equally wished for by the rest of your family. I hope therefore, that you will not attempt to give the least opposition, to what appears, from all these concurrent circumstances, to have been the disposition of heaven; no timidity from your supposed personal disability, no private attachment to a less publick station, no friendly connexions formed elsewhere, but should give way to the call of the Almighty, so manifestly made known to you on this occasion. To judge otherwise would be only the illusion of self-love, and I am so convinced of this, that I pronounce without hesitation to you, that you cannot with a safe conscience decline, however reluctant you may feel yourself, to submit to the charge which you are called upon to undertake. Had the Society to which you once belonged still subsisted, though you could not have sought for an Ecclesiastical Dignity, yet you must have considered yourself conscientiously oblidged to accept of one even at the extremities of the earth, if you had been duly commanded; you would in that case have justly considered the command, as the voice of God, which you ought not to resist : - The voice of God seems to be equally forcible upon you now; you have not sought after the dignity which you are invited to, and if you had sought after it, it might be reasonably suspected that your vocation to it was not from God, but can you, Sir, doubt a moment, but that your vocation to the Episcopacy, which you never thought of aspiring to, is from God, when you are appointed to it by the Vicar of Christ; when you have been postulated for it, by the united unbiassed voices of so many Prelates? I think you cannot reasonably, and I think you would judge with regard to another, as I do with regard to you, were you consulted in similar circumstances. I will own to you, that whilst I rejoice, and you I think ought to acquiesce in our success, from the advantage, which at this most critical moment for religion amongst us, your nomination will be of to it, from your family, and your connexions, to say nothing of your personal qualifications, which I with pleasure hear well spoken of, by those who know you; at the same time 1 say, that I rejoice in our success, from these motives, there is another motive, which ought to make it particularly acceptable to you : it is, that in you, the difficulty which it might be feared, would have continued to prevail against those who had been members of the Society, hath been happily, and for the first time, I believe, in an occasion of this sort, gotten over. Do not then, my dear Sir, disappoint my hopes : lend yourself resignedly and cheerfully to the designs of the Almighty upon you! With the same earnestness with which we have struggled for your promotion, we will give you all the assistance in our power, all the assistance that you can expect from our knowledge and experience of things here, to render your new dignity easy and comfortable to you. You may depend upon every friendship from our good Archbishop, from Dr. Butler, of Cork, from me, from us all. In a word ! The Diocese to which you are appointed, is one of the most respectable in the kingdom, particularly from the consequence, opulence, and number of edifying Catholicks in the City of Limerick, which may be reckoned among the foremost in the British Dominions, for its elegance, riches, trade, and situation; it is but a short, and most charming ride of five and twenty miles from Cahir : but these last are but secondary and human motives; I lay my main stress with you on the glory of God, on the salvation of souls, on the ends of your Ministry, on the good of Religion; and to these motives, surely, every advantage of birth, influence, and talents, with which it hath pleased God to bless you, should be made subservient! You will excuse my writing thus freely to you; besides that my station entitles me to interfere in a matter, wherein the cause of religion appears to me to be so essentially concerned in a matter wherein I took so active a part, I claim a sort of a right with regard to you, to do it, as Bishop of your native Diocese, and from the sincere respect I have for my Lord Cahir, and all his noble family. His Lordship is shortly expected here, at farthest, some time in the next month, and as he will make England, where I suppose him to be actually on his way home, I hope that you will accompany him hither. I flatter myself, that I shall have the pleasure of welcoming you amongst us, at the same time that I will pay my respects to his lordship, I pray in the mean time to be remembered to him, and to the Honorable Mr. Butler with the most respectful attention, I shall say no more to you, I need say no more to you : the Grace and inspiratien of that good God, who gave you to our wishes will, I trust, do the rest with you.
I am with all affection and respect,
Honoured Sir,
Your most obedt. and most hmble. Servt.
WM. EGAN.
My address, if you will honor me with a letter, is
To Dr. Egan, Clonmel, Ireland.

To these appeals the Rev. Father begged leave to express his surprise that such a transaction had been carried on without the least previous intimation to him, adding, “As matters stand, I must sacrifice my tranquillity and happiness in a private station, or subject myself by an opposition to perhaps the severest reflections. Cruel dilemma! Let those then take the blame, who have any ways concurred in such a choice. All left me to do, is to submit to the will of others. I resign myself therefore into your friendly hands, on whom I depend for every assistance. But please to take particular notice, that my submission and resignation are on this condition, that whenever the Society of Jesus be restored, I shall be at full and perfect liberty to re- enter the same, and retire again to my College, the seat of virtue and real happiness”.
On the 25th of April, the Archbishop informed him, that the Sac. Cong, had confirmed on the 29th ult. the choice of the Prelates “and all that is wanting to complete our happiness, is to see you safely arrived in this kingdom to take possession of the See you are named to. I hope you will not delay on the receipt of this. Let nothing alarm you ‘A Domino factum est istud’. Your submission to the Orders of Providence will assure to you every assistance from heaven”.
In May the Rev. Father left England for Ireland in company with his brother Lord Cahir. The Archbishop on the 31st of May, addressed him a note at Cahir Castle of congratulation, promised to wait upon him as soon as possible, and announced the receipt of a letter from Mr. Conwey, Vicar Capitular of Limerick, assuring him that he would meet with the most pleasing reception there both from the Clergy and Laity and that all ranks of People were most impatient for his arrival amongst them. On the 10th July, 1778, the Archbishop, announced that the Bulls so long expected were arrived, and had been forwarded to him from Paris the preceding week; but that an indispensible journey on his part, had prevented him from attending to them before. “I need not tell you the pleasure it gave me to receive them, and how earnestly I wish and hope, that the use which is to be made of them may tend to advance the glory of God and the good of the Diocess of Limerick”. But the arrival of the Bulls served only to distress the humble Priest, and to decide him on declining the proffered dignity, in a mild, most courteous and respectful letter, he cordially thanked the Archbishop for the distinguished zeal and interest he had taken for his promotion; but that he could not make up his mind to accept the heavy responsibility. “I decline the proffered honor, because I really think myself incapable of fulfilling the duties of such a station in the Church”. In the following month, F. Butler returned to Hereford, to the great exultation of his numerous and very attached acquaintance.

  • On the 22nd of January, 1816, Richard Baron Cahir was promoted to the dignity and title of Viscount Cahir and Earl Glengal in the County of Tipperary.

Butler, Thomas, 1718-1779, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2291
  • Person
  • 20 November 1718-04 May 1779

Born: 20 November 1718, Lancashire, England
Entered: 07 September 1739, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1746
Final Vows: 02 February 1757
Died: 04 May 1779, Eyne, Hereford, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Hon Thomas Butler alias Thompson, Baron Caher - Son of Thomas 6th Baron Caher and Frances Butler - Older brother of John RIP 1786

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BUTLER, THOMAS, was born on the 20th of November, 1718, commenced his Noviceship at Watten, on the 7th of September, 1739, and was Professed in the Order on the 2nd of February, 1757. I am informed that he had been Minister of Clermont College at Paris : afterwards he was in Spain, and was there involved in the expulsion of his Brethren, on the 4th of April, 1767. F. Thomas Butler died at Eign adjoining Hereford, (where the Chapel probably was, before the house in Byestreet was purchased) on the 4th of May, 1779. For a short period he had resided at Home Lacy, a seat of the late Duke of Norfolk, about five miles distant from Hereford.

Cassidy, Bernard, 1714-1788, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1034
  • Person
  • 29 September 1714-11 June 1788

Born: 29 September 1714, Ireland
Entered: 07 September 1735, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 24 March 1742
Final Vows: 02 February 1753
Died: 11 June 1788, Thame Park, Oxfordshire, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Stafford

1768 was at Wackworth, Banbury, England (poss Warkworth)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Cassidy alias Stafford (Uncertainty about his real name, the Provincial’s Note-book says vere Stafford, and the 1754 Catalogue says vere Cassidy)
Educated at St Omer before Ent
1746 On the London Mission
1758 On the Mission of Oxburgh, Norfolk
1771 Superior of St Mary’s Residence, Oxford (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
1779 On the Dorchester Mission, near Oxford
On his tombstone “IHS, Bernard Stafford, died July 12th, 1788, aged 76” (Reverend TG Lee, DCL, FSA) and a copy of that inscription on the floor of the chapel at Thame Park. As it is most improbable that he would have been buried under his assumed name, this monumental inscription may be taken as convincing evidence that his real name was Stafford. In the brief notice of Warkworth, Northampton, which formerly belonged to the Holman family, and then passed by an heiress to the Eyres of Derbyshire, it is stated that the only Father of the Society that could be traced there was father Bernard Stafford alias or vere Cassidy, who was residing at Warkworth 1764, and subsequent years, finally at Thame Park, where he died June 11 1788. It is further stated that Mr Holman, the Squire of Warkworth, married the Lady Anastasia Stafford, probably a sister or near relative of Father Stafford. The family connection may have been a reason for Lady Holman’s retaining Father Bernard as Chaplain.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
STAFFORD, BERNARD, (his true name was Cassidy) : he was born in Ireland during the month of December, 1713. At the age of 22 he entered the Novitiate at Watten : and was admitted to the Profession of the Four Vows in London in 1753. For some time he resided at Thame Park, where he died on the 11th of June, 1788. His services on the Mission well deserve remembrance and imitation.

Clarke, John, 1662-1723, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1048
  • Person
  • 17 March 1662-01 May 1723

Born: 17 March 1662, Kilkenny
Entered: 07 September 1681, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1689
Final Vows: 02 February 1699
Died: 01 May 1723, Ghent, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Of same family as Duke de Feltre
Talented and remarkably good memory
Was Master of Novices
Was on Mission at Liège - Missionary to the soldiers at Ghent??; Was in Spain as a Camp Missionet; Prefect of Church at Watten
1693 Preaching and engaged in Church work
1705 Spiritual Father at Ghent
Mentioned in ANG Catalogue 1690, 1693, 1700-5; 1711-14

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Relative of John Philip Mulcaile

“The Apostle of Belgium”
Studied Humanities at St Omer’s
1690 A Tertian at Ghent
1693 A Missioner and Preacher
1696 Camp Missioner in Ghent
1699 For several years a Missioner at Watten
His apostolic career is very similar to that of John Francis Regis, both in labour and fruit. The Colleges of Liège, Watten and Ghent, with their respective neighbourhoods. were the principal scenes of his missionary work, and he was frequently engaged as a camp missioner to the English, Irish and Scotch forces in the Low Countries. he was almost always engaged with his countrymen and in missions in Belgium. We do not trace him in England.
The Annual Letters abound in reports of his labours, and the marvellous results, in which constant and striking miracles are not wanting extending over a period of nearly twenty-nine years. (cf “Records SJ” Vol v, and Annual Letters for Liège, Ghent and Watten)

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father John Clarke SJ 1662-1723
Fr John Clarke was born in Kilkenny in 1662. Educated at St Omer, he entered the Society at Watten Belgium in 1681. All his life he was occupied as a misioner in the Netherlands, mainly as chaplain to the Irish, Scots and English soldiers campaigning there.

In the course of his work he rescued between 2,000 and 3,000 souls from heresy or evil living, mainly among the officers. His chief object in his preaching was to counteract Jansenism, and to recommend the frequent use of the sacraments.

So great was his success as a preacher that whenever he appeared on the streets, crowds pressed round to see and hear him. He laid is down as a necessary condition of success for a missioner “that he throw his whole heart and energy into the work, be unsparing of self in every useful work, and yet place his whole dependence on God”.

This saintly and zealous preacher died at Ghent on May 1st 1723, aged 61.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CLARKE, JOHN The second of this name, whose life was a model of the Apostolic career of St. John Francis Regis, died at Ghent, 1st May, 1723, aet. 61, Soc. 42.

Comerfort, Gerard, 1632-1688, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1079
  • Person
  • 18 July 1632-19 March 1688

Born: 18 July 1632, County Waterford
Entered: 01 November 1651, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 31 March 1657, Liège, Belgium
FinalVows: 15 August 1675, Waterford
Died: 19 March 1688, Irish College, Poitiers, France

1655 Catalogue at Liège in 2 years Theology
1680-1688 Irish College, Poitiers, first as Infirmarian, then as Procurator and Minister
also : Germanus recte Gerard Comerford”; RIP 19 March 1687

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1655 In second year of Theology at Liège - had great talents and made great progress in his studies
1658 Taught Mathematics at Liège
1664 A missioner at St George’s Residence, Worcester district
1667 At College of Holy Apostles, Suffolk district

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already begun Priestly studies before Entry 01 November 1651 ANG
1653-1657 After First Vows he was sent for studies, graduating MA, to Liège for Theology and was Ordained there 31 March 1657
1657-1660 After he made Tertianship, for a time he was Prefect of Studies and taught Mathematics at the Juniorate in Liège. He was considered to be a man of more than ordinary ability, but dogged by ill health.
1660-1667 On the Mission in England, at Northampton, Lincoln and Worcester
1667-1675 His whereabouts from 1667 are unclear, except that he had become a member of the Irish Mission by 1672, and strong evidence that he was already in Ireland by December 1669 and at the Waterford Residence (probably for health reasons) and made Final Vows there 15 August 1675. There is little or no account of his work thereafter on the Irish Mission. Because his earlier associations with England were known to the promoters of the Titus Oates Plot, he escaped to France and served as Minister and Procurator of the Irish College Poitiers until his death there 19 March 1688

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
QUEMERFORD, GERARD, a native of Ireland, joined the English Province of the Society in 1651, aet 19. and was studying his second year of Divinity at Liege in 1655. What relation was he to F. James Quemerford?

Conway, John, 1625-1689, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/2305
  • Person
  • 1625-08 October 1689

Born: 1625, Dunkirk or Ireland
Entered: 17 March 1651, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Died: 08 October 1689, Ghent, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
DOB Ireland; Ent c 1660 as Brother; RIP 09 Novmber 1689 Ghent
In Father Morris’s Transcripts, he is called an Irishman.

(There is another Br John Conway - DOB 1597; Ent 1620; RIP 10 August 1642 Galway)

In Old/16

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CONWAY, JOHN, born in Flanders : died at Ghent, 9th November,1689, aet. 64, Rel. 38.

Conway, William, 1659-1689, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1098
  • Person
  • 1659-25 February 1689

Born: 1659, Flintshire or Ireland
Entered: 14/10/1679, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1688
Died: 25 February 1689, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Conway, William, 1683-1741, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1097
  • Person
  • 14 July 1683-13 September 1741

Born: 14 July 1683, Flintshire or Ireland
Entered: 1702, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1710
Died: 13 September 1741, St Omer, France - - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CONWAY, WILLIAM, admitted in 1702 : was living at Ghent 26 years later, “sine officio” died at St. Omer, 13th September, 1741, set. 59.

Corby, Ambrose, 1605-1649, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1102
  • Person
  • 25 December 1605-11 April 1649

Born: 25 December 1605, Yorkshire or Dublin
Entered: 07 September 1627, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1632, Belgium
Final Vows: 05 August 1641, College of St Omer, France
Died: 11 April 1649, English College, Rome, Italy - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Corbington

Youngest brother of Robert RIP - 1637; Ralph RIP - 1644
Son of Gerard RIP - 1627

There are 4 “Corby” entries
Ambrose Ent 1627
Gerard Ent 1627 (Father of Robert, Ralph and Ambrose)
Robert Ent 1628
Ralf DOB 1598; Ent 1624; RIP 1644 at Tyburn (martyr)
Another Son/Brother Richard, died at St Omer College
Two daughters/sisters, Mary and Catherine, became Benedictine nuns, as did Isabella in 1533 (she died 25/12/1652 a centenarian)
Gerard married to Isabella Richardson, and they moved to Dublin, where his sons were born, and eventually Belgium. He became a Jesuit Brother when he and his wife decided to separate and consecrate themselves to God. All three sons were born in Dublin

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Father Gerard and brothers Robert and Ralph became Jesuits. His mother Isabella and sisters Mary and Catherine became Benedictine nuns.
Sent by his father to St Omer for Humanities
1622 Went to English College Rome for studies 11 October 1622. He won the praises of all there and received Minor Orders.
He was then sent to Belgium, where his father was now living in exile, for health reasons, and Ent 07 September 1627
1645 Minister at Ghent
1649 Was Minister at English College Rome when he died
He wrote and interesting biography about his father Gerard, who in his old age became a Brother of the Society
He taught the “belles lettres” for some years at St Omer, was highly accomplished in Greek and Latin literature, and was distinguished for great modesty, humility, patience and charity towards others, and piety towards God.
Nothing to do with HIB or Irish Mission
(cf “Records SJ” Vol iii p 97 and another volume p 299; de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CORBIE, AMBROSE, born near Durham, on Thursday, 7th December,1604, O.S. as I find in a memorandum. In the Diary of the minister of the English College at Rome, he is recorded to have defended Logic 20th August, 1623 “con honore”. Four years later he embraced “the pious Institute” of the Society, at Watten : was ordained Priest at St. Omer, 20th September, 1633, and raised to the rank of a Professed Father 5th August, 1641; was Confessarius to the English College at Rome, 11th April, 1649. From the classic pen of this young Jesuit, we have “Certamen Triplex, or the Life and Martyrdom of his Brethren Ralph Corbie, of F. T. Holland, and of F. Hen. Morse”, all of S. J., 12mo. Antwerp, 1645, pp. 144, with portraits. This Latin book is in great requisition among collectors.

Corby, Blessed Ralph, 1598-1644, Jesuit priest and Martyr

  • IE IJA J/1103
  • Person
  • 25 March 1598-17 September 1644

Born: 25 March 1598, Dublin
Entered: 1625 - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: pre 1625, Valladolid, Spain
Final Vows: 01 May 1640, Durham
Died: 17 September 1644, Tyburn, London, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Martyr

Middle brother of Robert RIP - 1637; Ambrose RIP - 1649
Son of Gerard RIP - 1627

There are 4 “Corby” entries
Ambrose Ent 1627
Gerard Ent 1627 (Father of Robert, Ralph and Ambrose)
Robert Ent 1628
Another Son/Brother Richard, died at St Omer College
Two daughters/sisters, Mary and Catherine, became Benedictine nuns, as did Isabella in 1533 (she died 25 December 1652 a centenarian)
Gerard married to Isabella Richardson, and they moved to Dublin, where his sons were born, and eventually to Belgium. He became a Jesuit Brother when he and his wife decided to separate and consecrate themselves to God. All three sons were born in Dublin
1628 at Liège studying Theology - in CAT 1628-1636

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Father Gerard and brothers Robert and Ralph became Jesuits. His mother Isabella and sisters Mary and Catherine became Benedictine nuns.
Sent by his father to St Omer for Humanities aged 15
Went to English College Rome then Seville and Valladolid where he was Ordained. He then Ent 1627.
1631 Sent to English Mission. He worked in Durham mostly.
1644 Seized by the Parliamentarian rebels at Hampsterley, while vesting for Mass 18 July 1644, and then committed to Newgate Prison at London 22 July 1644 in the company of his friend John Duckett. They were tried and condemned at the Old Bailey 14 September 1644 (Feast of Exaltation), and sent to the gallows at Tyburn 17 September 1644
His Brother Ambrose wrote and interesting biography about his father Gerard.
He taught the “belles lettres” for some years at St Omer, was highly accomplished in Greek and Latin literature, and was distinguished for great modesty, humility, patience and charity towards others, and piety towards God.
Nothing to do with HIB or Irish Mission
(cf “Records SJ” Vol iii pp 68 seq)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CORBIE, RALPH. This blessed martyr was actually born in Ireland, whither his father was suddenly compelled to fly to escape prosecution at home. Ralph in 1626, united himself to the Society : five years later began his missionary career at Durham and its neighbourhood, and laboured with all the spirit and zeal of the Apostles, until he fell into the snares of his enemies at Horpserley, 8th July, 1644. Put on board a Sunderland vessel for London, he was thrown into Newgate, 22d July, whence he was dragged to Tyburn, 7th September following, O. S., to receive that abundant reward in Heaven, which Christ has insured to those who suffer persecution for the sake of righteousness.

Cross, Bernard, 1715-1785, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1132
  • Person
  • 08 April 1715-22 April 1785

Born: 08 April 1715, County Kilkenny/Tenerife Canary Islands
Entered: 08 May 1737, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained” 1744
Final Vows: 15 August 1755
Died: 22 April 1785, Worcester, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Was on the Mission of Vera Cruz
1764 Rector of St Ignatius College (London) 13 November 1764 for many years
Subsequently he served the Worcester Mission, where he died 22 April 1785 aged 70

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CROSS, BERNARD, born in Tenerife, 8th April, 1715, and on his 22nd birth-day consecrated himself to God in the Society. He was admitted to the profession of the Four Vows on the Feast of the Assumption, 1755. For some time he exercised his missionary functions at Vera Cruz : for several years, I am informed, he was stationed in London, but died at Worcester, 22nd April, 1785; another account say 22nd October, and another 3d February that year. 1 think the first date is the correct one

Cuffe, Frederick, 1887-1951, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/107
  • Person
  • 10 June 1887-06 April 1951

Born: 10 June 1887, Dublin
Entered: 01 February 1907, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly
Ordained: 15 August 1920
Final vows: 02 February 1924
Died: 06 April 1951, Dublin

Part of St Mary's community, Emo, County Laois at time of his death

Early education at Clongowes Wood College SJ.

by 1911 at Leuven Belgium (BELG) studying
by 1912 at Stonyhurst England (ANG) studying

◆ Irish Province News

Irish Province News 26th Year No 3 1951

Obituary :

Fr. Cuffe was born in Dublin on June 10th, 1887. He was educated in the College of the Josephite Fathers, Ghent, Belgium, and at Clongowes. He entered the Society in 1907, and after his Juniorate, studied philosophy at Louvain and St. Mary's Hall, Stonyhurst. As a scholastic he taught in Clongowes, Belvedere and Mungret, besides being Third Line Prefect in Clongowes and Third Club Prefect in Mungret. He studied theology at Milltown Park, where he was ordained in 1920. After his Tertianship at Tullabeg (1922-23), he was appointed Vice-Superior in the Apostolic School, Mungret, a post which he held until 1933. He was then transferred to Clongowes where, in addition to his duties as master, he had charge of the People's Church. In 1943 he was appointed Spiritual Father at St. Mary's, Emo.
During the last few years of his life he suffered from heart trouble, which steadily became more acute. Shortly before Easter of the present year he went to stay with his family at Rathnew, Co. Wicklow, where, it was hoped, a period of complete rest and quiet would revive his fast-ebbing strength, But he was soon attacked with congestion of the lungs. His case became so serious that he was transferred to a nursing home in Leeson St., Dublin, where, fortified with the rites of the Church, he peacefully died at about 7 p.m. on Friday, April 6th.
Fr. Cuffe's personality and character, simple, straightforward, honest, devout, answered in a striking manner to the description of “the just man” in Holy Scripture. For him life had no brain-bewildering, heart-aching problems, but was a plain matter-of-fact business of ordinary duties to be faithfully performed day in day out. Be was of a courteous, cheerful disposition, a pleasant companion to live with, free from every trace of moodiness or low spirits, scrupulously exact in doing the work assigned to him, and ever ready to help in times of stress and strain. He was easily disturbed, it is true, when things went wrong, but impatience was but a passing “shadow of annoyance”, swiftly fleeting across the sunny landscape of his spirit. He was, indeed, incapable of deep and enduring resentment, and I doubt if he ever said a hard word about any of his brethren.
His religious life was cast in the same mould. Upon the deep spiritual foundation laid down by him in the noviceship, he raised the solid structure of his holy life as a Jesuit. The performance of his spiritual exercises, observance of rule, progress in virtue, he never failed to regard as duties of strict obligation, which he fulfilled with edifying exactitude. During the last few months of his life on earth, when physical debility rendered him incapable of even the lightest work, he was most assiduous in prayer, with the rosary or Dolour beads constantly in his hands. Death came to him peacefully; and I can well believe that he answered the Master's call with unruffled tranquility, as though it were part of the day's routine.
To simple-hearted, faithful servants such as Fr. “Freddy” Cuffe Our Lord Himself gives testimony : “Of such is the Kingdom of God”.

Dean, Michael, 1696-1760, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1171
  • Person
  • 29 September 1696-08 July 1760

Born: 29 September 1696, St Germain-en-Laye, Paris, France
Entered: 07 September 1714, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1724
Final Vows: 15 August 1727
Died: 08 July 1760, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

1723 Catalogue and 1737 Catalogue “M Dane Hibernus”
1743 Catalogue Michael Dean
Hogan note : I trace him in the years 1737-49, an Irishman born at Paris, son of John Deane and Francis Plowden. Father was Comptroller of the Household of James II who followed James II to Paris

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
For many years a Missioner of the Holy Apostles, Suffolk, and the Residence of St Thomas of Canterbury, Hampshire.
Among the adherents of James II were Stephen Deane, Mayor of Galway in 1690, and Lieutenant Dean of Lord Bophin’s infantry (”King James Army List” by D’Alton). Dominic Dean of Cong, County Mayo was attained in 1691 (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
(I think the above refers to Thomas Deane RIP 1719, though perhaps they were brothers with Thomas the elder?)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
DEAN, MICHAEL, born on Michaelmas day, 1696 , joined the Society at the age of 18, was long employed in the Hampshire mission : died at Watten, 8th July, 1760.

Deane, Thomas, 1693-1719, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1172
  • Person
  • 02 February 1692-17 September 1719

Born: 02 February 1693, Cadiz, Spain
Entered: 20 December 1709, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1719
Died: 17 September 1719, Ghent, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Plowden

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of John an Irish gentleman and Frances née Plowden ( a daughter of Francis Plowden, who in turn was a son of Edmund Plowden of Plowden Hall, Shropshire, Comptroller of the Household of James II, and who followed his Royal master into exile at St Germain-en-Laye, near Paris)
Sent to the English College Rome for Humanities, and admitted then in Rome.
Dominic Deane of Cong and Dean of Galway were adherents of James II (cf D’Alton’s “Army List of James II; Foley’s Collectanea)
Tobias Dean :
Note attached to Thomas Dean’s Entry about Tobias Dean, said to be a younger brother, DOB 26 October 1700, Ent English College Rome 21 October 1717 in the alias Benedict Plowden, and then left there for Spain 18 September 1718 (Records SJ, Vol vi, p 468)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
PLOWDEN, THOMAS, (alias Dean) born actually in Spain : and admitted an Alumnus of the English College at Rome, in 1706. In vain I search for other details than his death at Ghent, the 17th of September, 1719.

Edmunds, Edward, 1578-1643, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/1251
  • Person
  • 1578-20 September 1643

Born: 1578, Ireland
Entered: 1614, England - Angliae Province (ANG)
Professed: 1630
Died: 20 September 1643, Ghent, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias FitzEdmund
1628 Socius of the Procurator of ANG

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1628 In Madrid
Latin name of Edwardus is Edmundus.
He is called an Irishman in Catalogue ANG 1628 (cf Foley’s "Collectanea")

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
EDMUNDS, EDMUND, of Devonshire. This confidential lay-brother died at Ghent, 20th September, 1643, aet.75, Rel. 27.

Halpin, Thomas, 1819-1878, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1404
  • Person
  • 11 December 1819-18 July 1878

Born: 11 December 1819, Dublin
Entered: 29 September 1837, Ghent, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 02 June 1849, Maynooth, County Kildare
Professed: 02 February 1860
Died: 18 July 1878, Bray, County Wickow

Part of the St Francis Xavier's, Upper Gardiner Street, Dublin community at the time of death

by 1851 at St Beuno’s studying Theol 4
by 1865 at Lowe House St Helen’s Lancashire (ANG)

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
His early education was at Tullabeg and Clongowes.

After First Vows he was sent to Tullabeg first and then Clongowes for Regency. he also studied part of his Theology at Clongowes, and was Ordained in Maynooth by Dr Murray 02 June 1849. He was a man of superior talent and he was appointed head of the Galway College and built the Church and residence there. He also spent some time on the English Mission. Returning to Ireland, he was sent as Operarius at Gardiner St, and remained there until his death 18 July 1878. He actually died in Bray, where he had gone for a change of air. His sermons were admired by all as perfect compositions. A very large number of priests, Secular and religious attended his office at Gardiner St.

Haywood, Francis, 1630-1706, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/1425
  • Person
  • 1630-15 March 1706

Born: 1630, County Meath
Entered: 30 July 1651 Liège, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Final Vows: 02 February 1663
Died: 15 March 1706, Ghent, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Studied Humanities
1678 at Liège - informarian and in charge of the medicines (had knowledge of medecines)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was an educated man and had studied Humanities before Ent.
1694 Socius to Procurator at Antwerp.
1701 & 1704 Infirmarian

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
HAYWOOD, FRANCIS, died at Ghent, 15th of March 1706. In vain do I search for further particulars about him.

Hurley, Thomas, 1890-1976, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/188
  • Person
  • 20 January 1890-13 October 1976

Born: 20 January 1890, Drimoleague, County Cork
Entered: 07 September 1907, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly
Ordained:15 August 1922
Final vows: 02 February 1926
Died: 13 October 1976, St Camillus Hospital, Limerick

Part of the Sacred Heart, The Crescent, Limerick community at the time of death

“Vita Functi” in HIB Catalogue 1978 says RIP date is 15/10, but this is a typo and should be 13/10.

Early education at Clongowes Wood College SJ

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
After some Jesuit studies in Ireland, Thomas Hurley sailed for Australia in 1916 and joined the Xavier College staff, teaching public exam students and taking senior debating. He was rowing master, 1918-20. After final vows in 1927 he spent most of his life teaching in various schools.

◆ Irish Province News

Irish Province News 52nd Year No 2 1977

Obituary :
Fr Thomas Hurley (1890-1976)
On October 13th 1976, at St. Camillus Hospital, Limerick, died Fr Thomas Hurley, SJ
Born on January 20th 1890 at Drimoleague, Co. Cork, he completed his primary education in the local National School, and then went to Clongowes. From there, on September 7th, 1907 he entered the Noviceship at Tullabeg. On completing his Noviceship, he began his Juniorate Studies in the same place - passing to the other side of the Refectory from that of the novices to take his place among his fellow Juniors. From Tullabeg he went to Milltown Park, from where he went for two years to UCD., studying Science. He was then sent to North Brabant for his Philosophy, (1912-1214), after which he began teaching in Belvedere College, Dublin. From 1915 to 1920 he was teaching in St. Xavier's, Melbourne from which he returned to Milltown Park for Theology, and was ordained on August 15th 1922. After Theology, he went to Ghent, Belgium, for his Tertianship: 1924-1925,
He began to lecture in Philosophy and to teach Mathematics in Mungret College in 1925, from where he went to the Crescent in 1928 to teach Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. His teaching career continued when he went to Clongowes in 1933, and when he returned to the Crescent in 1939. This teaching career came to a halt in 1950 when he began a three year period as “Operarius” in the Crescent Church, Limerick.
Concerning Father Hurley’s teaching life, the following words from the Limerick Papers on the occasion of his death reveal something of his dedication as a teacher:
“Father Hurley was a man of great energy and was totally engaged in a variety of activities during his long life. Apart from his very lengthy and successful career as a teacher and missioner, he took a very keen interest in the Irish Language, and for many years brought groups of boys on Summer Courses to Irish Colleges. He wrote some CTS Pamphlets, and also the life of Father Michael Browne, SJ - a Limerick man. For a number of years he took a very keen and practical interest in the activities of the Irish Red Cross Society. He was always available for occasional sermons and Church supply work at short notice”.
During some of his teaching years in the Crescent, Fr. Hurley had, as his Prefect of Studies, Father Edward Andrews, now in Galway. Fr Andrews says: “He was a very painstaking teacher, and I could always rely on good results from his exam classes ... He joined our Community again when I was Rector. He was then only on Church work, and preached very good sermons. Of course, like all of us, he had his critics."
In 1953 Fr Tom Hurley was appointed to the Jesuit Mission and Retreat Staff in Tullabeg, where he remained until 1962. In that year he returned to pastoral work in the Crescent Church, Limerick, and remained at this work until 1976, although failing health interrupted this work very much during about five years before his death.
One who knew Fr Tom Hurley well as a missioner - Fr Willie Hogan, now in the Crescent - writes:
“Father Hurley came on the Mission Staff in 1953 when in his 64th year. While this was a very late beginning in a missioner's work and hence more onerous than for a younger person, Fr Hurley put his heart and soul into it. While not spectacular he was a solidly good missioner, hard-working and devoted to the Confessional. He got on well with the Parochial Clergy, which is a very important thing in the running of a Parish Mission. He was considerate for those working with him, and was ready to entertain and consider suggestions made for the general good of the mission in hand. I lived with him from 1971 onwards in the Crescent. By that time he had failed greatly and lived very much to himself. If I could do so, it is not the period of his life about which I should care to write much: senility is seldom flattering”.
Father Coyne, although somewhat senior in the Society to Father Tom Hurley, remembers that, at least among his contemporaries he was known as “Timothy Tom” - a name given him in the noviceship “as if in an inspired moment by a second-year novice who died recently in Australia. Fr Coyne says also that Fr. Hurley “showed little inclination for games throughout life; a pointer, perhaps, in this direction was the post he held as a Clongowes student in the boys' reading room, where he functioned as assistant librarian, and spent leisure hours in reading”.
In Obituary Notices critics rarely raise a voice, because, I suppose, of an excessive fidelity to the old rule: “de mortuis nil nisi bonum”. Yet if charitable care is made in making them, criticisms may well reveal nothing more than unfortunate consequences of virtues exercised without stint. It is not, for example, really so terrible a fault if an ever helpful and over-working teacher or Church-man surrenders wearily to a chair on returning to his room rather than to the energetic arranging neatly and in order of textbooks, “home-work”, sermon notes, reference books, letters, etc. God understands us, and will take heed and reward the good work that was done, and pay little attention - we can feel sure - to harmless human failings that were revealed in the doing of it.

Lynch, Charles, 1818-1906, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1597
  • Person
  • 21 July 1818-09 May 1906

Born: 21 July 1818, Dublin
Entered: 29 September 1837, Ghent, Belgium (BELG)
Ordained: by 1851
Professed: 25 March 1859
Died: 09 May 1906, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly

Younger brother of Henry Lynch - RIP 1874 and Uncle of Edmund Lynch - RIP 1890

by 1847 in Rome studying
by 1855 in Leuven Belgium (BELG) studying Theology
by 1856 at St Beuno’s Wales (ANG) studying Theology 4
by 1879 at Montauban France (TOLO) teaching
by 1881 at St Marys' Canterbury (FRA) teaching
by 1882 at Antwerp Institute Belgium (BELG) Regency
by 1891 at Pau, France (TOLO)

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Younger brother of Henry Lynch - RIP 1874 and Uncle of Edmund Lynch - RIP 1890
Early education was at Tullabeg, where he was brought by John Grene.
He studied Philosophy and Theology in France and was Ordained there.
He taught in various Colleges and was very proficient in French.
He taught English in Belgium for a while.
His older brother Henry was buried in the Old Cemetery at Rahan, and Charles was buried at the new College Cemetery there.

McCarthy, Peter, 1591-1660, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1692
  • Person
  • 1591-28 December 1660

Born: 1591, Belgium
Entered: 22 September 1617, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 03 April 1627, Mechelen, Belgium
Died: 28 December 1660, Roermond, Netherlands - Belgicae Province (BELG)

Son of Charles and Anne Wynter
Place of birth Trefontanensis - Rome? or could be Cerfontaine in Belgium
Fellow Novice of St Jan Berchmans. Studied at Antwerp
1638 “Fr Peter Carthy Superior in altero exercitu”
1642 at Dunkirk
Taught Humanities and Spiritual Father. On Castrensis Mission

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Charles and Anne née Wynter
Fellow Novice of Jan Berchmans
1638 He and William Boyton were on the Dutch Mission; He was Chaplain-in-Chief or Head Camp Missioner;
He was “Trifontanensis” by birth

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Charles (from the noble family de Clancar) an offier in the Spanish Army, and Anna née Wynter (she was Flemish)
He had already studied Humanities at the Jesuit College in Antwerp before Ent 22 September 1617 Mechelen
At Mechelen one of his fellow Novices was Jan Berchmans
After First Vows be was sent for studies in Philosophy to Antwerp and then Louvain. He then did three years Regency at BELG Colleges.
1694 He then returned to Louvain for Theology, and he was Ordained at Mechelen 03 April 1627
After Ordination he was in BELG as Operarius and frequently as a Military Chaplain. His longest periods of service were at Breda and Dunkirk, but he also worked at Ghent, Brussels and Roermond, where he spent the las four years of his life, dying there 28 December 1660
Not regarded as a “foreigner” in Ireland, he was frequently asked for by William Bathe for the Irish Mission. His capacity for languages (he was fluent in eight) meant it was decided he would be more useful remaining in Belgium, particularly because of his special qualities as a Military Chaplain, where his facility in languages meant he could minister to many different races of the Spanish Army based in the Low Countries.

Morris, Christopher W, 1607-1667, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1771
  • Person
  • 1607-01 August 1667

Born: 1605, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales
Entered: 1626 Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1635 Liège, Belgium
Final Vows: 19 October 1642, Liège, Belgium
Died: 01 August 1667, St Omer France - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Very learned Theologian, knew twelve languages and music.
Of ANG, he was about six years in Ireland.
1636 Tertian at Ghent.
1639 Professor of Philosophy for some years at Liège.
He does not appear in the 1649 ANG CAT, as he was taken prisoner on his way to Spain by an English pirate ship, and carried off to Ireland.
Mercure Verdier - Visitor to the Irish Mission - met him and mentioned him in a letter to General Caraffa 24 June 1649, as a truly religious and exceedingly learned man, both in Theology and Philosophy, a great linguist, being acquainted with eleven languages, besides Greek, skilled in music, of a modest demeanour and robust health. He added “We have few Missioners in our Province like him, ready for everything”. He laboured in Ireland for about five years.
1651 and 1655 He was again at Liège
1660 Professor of Theology at Brussels, and died at St Omer’s College 01 August 1667 aged 64

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MORRIS, CHRISTOPHER, born in Wales in 1607 : at the age of 19 joined the Society and became a Professed Father on the 19th of October, 1642. After filling the chair of Philosophy at Liege, he was ordered to Spain; but was taken by an English ship and carried, to Ireland, where he was engaged as a Tutor to a Nobleman’s son who little profited by his advice and instruction. Pere Verdier who met him in Ireland, reports him to the General, Vincent Caraffa, on the 24th of June 1649, as “vir vere religiosus, et eximié doclus in Theologicis et Philosophicis disciplinis en linguarum undecim praesertim Graeece peritus : scit Musicam : est modesto vultu : robusta vatetudine; and he adds : in nostra Provincia paucos similes habemus operarios ad omnia, instar illius, paratus”. It is painful to conclude with saying, that I can offer the indulgent Reader no further information of this worthy and highly gifted Father, excepting that he died at St. Omer on the 1st of August, 1667.

Murphy, Melchior, 1664-1736, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1802
  • Person
  • 16 October 1664,-13 February 1736

Born: 16 October 1664, Brussels, Belgium
Entered: 07 September 1684, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 21 March 1693
Final Vows: 23 October 1695
Died: 13 February 1736, Liège, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
DOB 06/10/1664/5 Brussels; Ent 1684/5; FV 23/10/1695; RIP 14/02/1736 Liège aged 72
1701 At Blois with a pupil
1704 At Watten as a Missioner and a Prefect of the Church
1724 At Liège, as a Missioner, and where he died 14/02/1736

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MURPHY, MELCHIOR. All that I can learn of this venerable Father is, that he was formed a Spiritual Coadjutor of the Society, on the 23rd of October, 1695, and that he died at Liege, on the 14th of February, 1736.

Murphy, Richard, 1716-1794, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 23 July 1716-14 May 1794

Born: 23 July 1716, London England
Entered: 07 September 1723, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1741, Liège, Belgium
Final Vows: 02 February 1752
Died: 14 May 1794, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Murphy or Morphy alias Turner
DOB 23 July 1716 London; Ent 07 September 1734; Ord 1740/1 Liège; FV 02 February 1752 Stella Hall, Northumberland; RIP 14 April 1794 Salisbury aged 78
1746 At College of the Immaculate Conception, Derbyshire. He was then sent to St John the Evangelist Residence in Durham, and served the mission of Stella Hall for some years.
1774 He retired to Salisbury, where he died 14 April 1794. His is buried on the east side of the Cathedral cloister, where a tablet to his memory was erected.

◆ In Chronological Catalogue Sheet
◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
TURNER, RICHARD. His true name was name was Murphy, was born in England on the 23rd of July, 1716 : after studying Humanities at St. Omer, began his Noviceship at Watten in the 18th year of his age, and was Professed on the 2nd of February, 1752, whilst serving the Mission of Stella Hall, in Northumberland. For the last twenty years of his life this worthy Father resided at Salisbury. He was buried on the East side of the Cathedral Cloister of that city, with this inscription : To the Memory of The Rev. Richard Turner, Who died on the 14th of May, 1794, Aged 77 years. R.I.P.

Nihill, Edward, 1752-1806, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1830
  • Person
  • 18 January 1752-04 November 1806

Born: 18 January 1752, Antigua, West Indies
Entered: 07 September 1769, Ghent Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1776
Died: 04 November 1806, Trinidad, West Indies - Angliae Province (ANG)

Brother of John (ANG) RIP date and place not recorded, but likely in West Indies

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Note from Bishop Laurence Arthur Nihell Entry
There were three other Nihell’s SJ. One was the brother of the Bishop, John and Edward who DOB at Antigua, and entered the Society at Ghent in 1768 and 1769. Edward died a victim of charity attending negroes at Trinidad in 1826 (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ In Chronological Catalogue Sheet
◆ CATSJ I-Y has Ent 1769 (cf Cat Chr and Foley p546)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NIHELL,EDWARD, born in Antigua, the 18th of January, 1752 : in the 17th year of his age embraced the pious institute of St. Ignatius. At the time of the expulsion of his English Brethren from Bruges, he was one of the Masters; and subsequently at Liege, filled the same employment. Here he was ordained Priest, and said his first Mass, on the 6th of June, 1776. Twelve years later, he succeeded the Reverend Charles Forrester, as the Missionary at Wardour. After discharging his functions for 14 years, so as to endear his memory for ever, to that Congregation, he left for Trinidad, and there fell a victim of Charity, on the 4th of November, 1806, in attending the poor Negroes. He was truly a man of much merit, esteemed for sound sense, and an amiable temper; “full of kindness and goodness”.

O'Brien, Peter, 1735-1807, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1861
  • Person
  • 28 March 1735-05 March 1807

Born: 28 March 1735, Ireland
Entered: 07 February 1754, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1759
Final Vows: 02 February 1770
Died: 05 March 1807, Newhall, Chelmsford, Essex, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Readmitted to Society 1803

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :

Two Entries
Brian or O’Brien or Briant
DOB 28 March 1735 Ireland; Ent 07 February 1754 Watten; FV 02 February 1770; RIP 28/02 or 05 March 1807 Newhall, Chelmsford aged 72
1766 He was a Missioner in Liverpool.
He spent ten years in the West India Mission, and in 1773 was in Antigua. Returning to England on account of ill health, he was sent to Newhall, Chelmsford, and died there 18/02 or 05 March 1807 aged 72
He had re-entered and renewed his Vows in the Restored Society when he died.

◆ In Old/15 (1) and Chronological Catalogue Sheet

◆ CATSJ A-H has “Briant alias O’Brien”; DOB 28 March 1735; Ent 1754 pr 1752
In ANG Cat of 1763
1767 Missionary

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
O’BRIEN, PETER, was born on the 28th of March, 1735, and entered the Novitiate at Watten, on the 7th of September, 1754, after defending Philosophy with great credit. Losing sight of him for many years, I renew acquaintance with him at Newhall, Essex, where the venerable Father rendered his soul to God, in July, 1807, or as another account in forms me, on the 28th of February, that year.

O'Connell, Michael, 1688-1726, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1876
  • Person
  • 28 September 1688-29 December 1726

Born: 28 September 1688, Ireland
Entered: 07 September 1707, Hodder, Stonyhurst, England - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1715
Died: 29 December 1726, St Ignatius College, London, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

1714 at Liège studying Theology

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Three Entries (1) Michael O’Connell; (2) No Ch Name Connell; (3) Michael Connell
(1) Michael O’Connell
DOB 28 23 September 1688 Ireland; Ent 07 September 1707; RIP 1726 England
1714 Second year Theology at Liège
1723 Procurator at Ghent
Minister at Valladolid; Of good talent and singular prudence (Foley’s Collectanea)
(2) No Ch Name Connell
DOB Ireland; Ent pre 1716; RIP post 1716
(3) Michael Connell
DOB 23 September 1688 Ireland; Ent 07 September 1707 ANG; RIP 1726 England
1719-1724 Minister and Procurator at Ghent
1724 Minister at Valladolid

O'Neill, William, 1711-1770, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1943
  • Person
  • 20 April 1711-11 July 1770

Born: 20 April 1714, Ireland or St Germain-en-Laye, Paris
Entered: 07 September1732, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Final Vows: 02 February 1743
Died: 11 July 1770, Waterperry, Oxfordshire, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Nelson

Son of John and Elizabeth (Gradell or Gradwell)
Younger brother of John O'Neill (Gradell) RIP 1760

1740 ANG Catalogue in 3rd years Theology
1768 Prefect of the Church at Ghent Novitiate
In Foley p539, Hogan writes “William O’Neill”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Brother of John O’Neil (Gradell) - RIP 1760
One Catalogue says he was Irish, another that he was born at the Court of St Germain (the exiled Stuarts)
1743 Confessor to the nuns of Hoogsteete - there is a tradition in the Throchmorton that there was an O’Neil Library at Buckland House, Oxford
(cf https://archive.org/stream/historyofpostref00stap/historyofpostref00stap_djvu.txt)
1757 Serving in the Yorkshire District
1768 Prefect of the Church at the Novitiate Ghent (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NELSON, WILLIAM, born in Ireland, on the 20th of April, 1714. His Family name was O’Neil. This worthy Father died at Waterperry, in Oxfordshire, on the 11th of July, 1770. Soc. 38.

O'Reilly, Philip Joseph, 1719-1775, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1950
  • Person
  • 19 November 1719-24 January 1775

Born: 19 November 1719, Ardcath, County Meath
Entered: 26 September 1741, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 01 May 1750, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 02 February 1766
Died: 24 January 1775, Dublin

Older brother of Myles O’Reilly - RIP 1799

Son of Patrick and Mary (O’Reilly); brother of Myles
Studied Humanities at Ghent
1743-1745 In Pholosophy at Antwerp
1745-1746 Teaching at Dunkirk
1746-1750 In Theology at Louvain
1750 At Amazon River Mission, or the Courou Mission S America, or on the Indian Mission since 1751, or 1757 in Paris Province FRA; or in the FLAN-BEL Province since 1751. “Joseph Philip O’Reilly missioned among the savages of Guiana for 14 years. This last survivor and sole representative of the Company of Jesus among the poor savages was expelled by the French in 1765” (Marshall’s Xtian Missions) Many letters he sent to in Flemish his brother Miles are at Burgundian Library. (loose Hogan note)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Patrick and Mary née O’Reilly. Older brother of Miles.
Studied Humanities under the Dominicans at Lierre for two years, and then for four under the Jesuits at Ghent.
1741 Received by the FLAN Provincial at Ghent and sent to Mechelen for his Noviceship.
1743-1745 At Antwerp studying Philosophy
1745-1747 Regency at Dunkirk
1747-1751 Studied Theology at Louvain for four years.
1751 Sent to West Indies, began at the Amazon, and then in the Indies went through the severest hardships, which he narrates with much joy in Flemish letters to his brother Miles - these have been edited by Father Morris with a brief sketch of his life.
1765 Sent to the Maryland Mission
1769 Sent to first to Belgium and then Ireland, dying in Dublin 24/01/1775.
1771 Catalogue Sent to Maryland again?
According to Marshall’s “Missions” Vol iii, p 74, “The French in 1763 expelled from Guiana, the venerable Father O’Reilly, the last survivor and sole representative of the Company of Jesus among the savages - with the result that - in 1766 religion was dying out among the whites as well as among the coloured races”
Carayon in his “Guyane Francaise” says Father O’Reilly was expelled in 1765.
His letters are in the Burgundian Library, Brussels MSS 6689, written in Flemish and dated Cayenne, 27 March and 25 September 1751, 19 June 1753 and 10 September 1754.

◆ Fr John MacErlean SJ :
Made Latin studies in Belgium and then Ent at Mechelen in 1741
1750 Having completed Theology at Louvain he left for the Mission of Cayenne in French Guyana, arriving in 1751
1751 At Courou (Kourou), French Guyana labouring among indigenous tribes for almost a dozen years
1763 At the expulsion of Jesuits from French territories, he was the last Jesuit to leave, and is said to have gone to Spanish Missions along the Orinoco
1765 Arrived at the English Maryland Mission
1769 Returned to Ireland worked in Dublin, where he died in 1775

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Patrick and Maria née O’Reilly. Brother of Myles RIP Antwerp 1799
Early education was in Belgium before Ent 26 September 1741 Mechelen; RIP 24 January 1775 Dublin
1743-1751 After First Vows he was sent to Antwerp and Louvain for studies and was Ordained there 1750.
1751-1763 When his formation was complete he was sent to the French Mission in Cayenne, French Guyana. There he worked with the Indian tribes for twelve years. When Jesuits were expelled from all of France and her territories, he was the last Jesuit to leave. When he left Cayenne, he is said to have gone to the Spanish Missions along the Orinoco, and from there to the ANG Mission in Maryland. The rest of his missionary life up to the Suppression is unclear. It would appear that he returned to Ireland after the Suppression and died in Dublin a year later 24 January 1775.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Philip O’Reilly 1719-1755
Fr Philip O’Reilly was born at Ardcath County Meath in 1719. He went to Belgium for his education where he joined the Society at Mechelen in 1741.

He left for the Mission of Cayenne in French Guyana in 1750, where he laboured for over a dozen years among the Indians at Kourou. On the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1763, he was the last Jesuit to leave his post.

He went for a short time to the Spanish Missions along the Orinoco and thence in 1765 to the English Mission of Maryland,

In 1769 he returned to Ireland and died in Dublin in 1775.

Ottevaere, Camillus, 1870-1946, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1962
  • Person
  • 14 September 1870-06 September 1946

Born: 14 September 1870, Ghent, Belgium
Entered: 24 September 1890, Drongen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1901
Final vows: 02 February 1909
Died: 06 September 1946, Drongen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)

by 1916 came to Gardiner St (HIB) working 1915-1919

Petre, Charles, 1646-1712, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1980
  • Person
  • 04 November 1646-18 January 1712

Born: 04 November 1646, Cranham, Essex, England
Entered: 07 September 1667, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 04 April 1673
Died: 18 January 1712, St Omer’s College, St Omer, Hauts-de-France, France - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Spencer
Son of Sir Francis, 1st Bart and Elizabeth (Gage) of Cranham; brother of Sir Edward alias Spencer (ANG) RIP 15 May 1699 and William alias Gage (ANG) RIP 22 February 1722

◆ The English Jesuits 1650-1829 Geoffrey Holt SJ : Catholic Record Society 1984
1687 London (Fenchurch Street school, Superior)
1688 In prison in Dover
1690 Ireland

Came with three others (Joseph Plowden, Andrew Poulton and Matthew Wright) under former ANG Provincial, John Warner, in 1689-1690 and was a Missioner in Ireland, Fr Warner as Confessor, the others in schools, and preaching in the country

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
PETRE, CHARLES, was younger brother of the celebrated F. Edward Petre. Under the article Charles Palmer, we have mentioned the Savoy College. Besides this, another College was founded by King James II, in nearly the heart of London, and attached to the Bavarian Chapel. At Lady-day, 1688, seven members of the Society began their residence here, and F. Charles Petre was appointed Superior of his Brethren regular discipline was observed. The morning and Evening discourses, every Sunday, were frequented by eager audiences : upwards of 200 persons were reconciled to the Catholic Church. The school indeed was not so frequented as the Savoy College, but promised well, when the destructive revolution burst forth. F. Charles P. consulted his safety by flight, but was discovered and committed to Dover Jail; yet was treated with humanity, and discharged shortly after. Retiring to St. Omer, he filled the office of Procurator, and ended his days there on the 18th of Jan. 1712.
N.B. I suspect several of the Petres who entered the society, were the descendants from Thomas (third son of John, 1st Lord,) Petre, who was seated at Cranham and Fidlers, in Essex.

Pippard, Luke, 1716-1761, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1986
  • Person
  • 29 September 1716-05 January 1761

Born: 29 September 1716, London, England / Ireland
Entered: 07 September 1733, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1742
Final Vows: 02 February 1744
Died: 05 January 1761, Crondon Park, Essex, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ Old/15 (1) and Chronological Catalogue Sheet as Stanfield

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
STANFIELD, LUKE (alias Pippard) born in London 29th Sept. 1716, made a Spiritual Coadjutor 1748, fifteen years after his admission into the Society ; died In England on the 5th of January, 1761.

Pole, Michael, 1687-1748, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1993
  • Person
  • 20 August 1687-23 April 1748

Born: 20 August 1687, Yorkshire, England
Entered: 07 September 1707, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1716
Died: 23 April 1748, Odstock Wiltshire, or Canford Magna, Dorset, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ The English Jesuits 1650-1829 Geoffrey Holt SJ : Catholic Record Society 1984
1720-1723 In Ireland

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
POLE, MICHAEL. I meet with two members so called.
The 2nd was the Incumbent at Wardour for some time. He died in England, 23rd of April 1748, aet. 61. Soc, 41. He was also called Foxe.

Porter, Nicholas, 1724-1802, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1996
  • Person
  • 10 December 1724-25 August 1802

Born: 10 September 1724, El Puerto de Santa Maria, Cadiz, Spain
Entered: 07 September 1741, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1748
Final Vows: 02 February 1759
Died: 25 August 1802, Chiesa del Gesù, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

1772 ROM Catalogue At English College Rome Spiritual Father of Church, Repetitor, Consultor

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Born El Puerto de Santa Maria, Cadiz, Spain of Irish parents
Probably a kinsman of Nicholas Porter, merchant and Mayor of Waterford in 1689.
1754 Missioner at the College of the Holy Apostles, Suffolk
1763 Spiritual Father at English College Rome briefly and then Valladolid (ANG Catalogue 1763)
1767 Banished with his brethren from Spain 14/ April 1767
1771 At English College Rome as Spiritual Father
Minister at Ghent; Prefect at St Omer

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
PORTER, NICHOLAS, born at Porto S. Maria, near Cadix, the 10th of September, 1724. His Father was English : his Mother was Spanish. In 1741, he entered the Novitiate, and 18 years later became a Professed Father. For a short time he lived in the English College at Rome; thence departing for Spain, was involved in the storm that burst on his brethren, the 4th of April, 1767, and was banished from that kingdom. Previous to the general suppression of the Order, this good-natured little man settled himself in Rome, and for a short time was Spiritual Father in the English College there, but subsequently accepted the situation of Tutor to the sons of Mr. Denham, the Banker in Strada Rosella. When that Banker failed, F. Porter retired to St Carlo : and strange to say, got himself initiated in the Third Order of St. Francis. Soon after this, he quitted Rome for Naples, and attached himself to the Family of Palomba, wealthy Merchants in that City. In 1797, he returned to Rome, and was admitted into the Giesu, where he was a fixture until his pious death, on the 25th of August, 1802, set. 78.

Quinn, James, 1698-1745, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2021
  • Person
  • 23 September 1698-27 November 1745

Born: 23 September 1698, London, England
Entered: 07 September 1717, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Final Vows: 10 June 1735
Died: 27 November 1745, Choptank River, Maryland, USA - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries
DOB 15 September 1698 London of Irish parents; Ent 07 September 1717; FV 10 June 1735 Maryland; RIP 27 November 1745 aged 47
pre 1728 sent to Maryland Mission
1745 Accidentally killed getting off a ferry boat that was being dragged by his horse on Chaptawk (sic) River (MAR CAT)

◆ In Old/18
◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
QUIN, JAMES, born on the 15th of September, 1698. On the 7th of September, 1717, he entered the Novitiate : was admitted to the rank of a Professed Father, on the 16th of June, 1735, in Maryland, and died in that Mission, on the 27th of November, 1745.

Sall, Andrew FitzBennet, 1612-1686, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2084
  • Person
  • 20 December 1612-20 January 1686

Born: 20 December 1612, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 20 December 1635, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained 19 April 1642, Liège, Belgium
Final Vows: 19 May 1645
Died: 20 January 1686, Cashel Residence, County Tipperary

Superior of Mission 13 October 1663

Andrew Fitzbennet Sall & Andrew Fitzjohn Sall - very difficult to distinguish which dates belong to which
1639 At Watten as novice; 1639 At Liège in Theology
1642 At Liège in 4th Year Theology; 1642 At Villagarcía as novice
1645 At Compostella
1649 At Valladolid Age 27 Preaching and teaching Philosophy and Theology
1651 At Salamanca Lector Controversias
and
1655 At Oviedo Operarius and teaching Controversias
1658 At Pamplona College teaching Philosophy and Controversies. Was Rector of Irish Seminary at St Martin
1660 At Palencia College CAST
1665 In Dublin
1667 Superior of Irish Jesuit Mission
and
1657 Andrew Sall priests - about being left at liberty by the Marshalls at Waterford (Is this him?) cf Arch HIB Vol VI p 184
1650 Catalogue Marked at Clonmel in 1649. Amongst those declared fit to be Superior of Irish Seminaries in Spain. Now in Tertianship. Age 33, from Cashel, Ent 1636, came to Mission 1644. Is now Superior at Clonmel Residence
1655 Catalogue is not in CAST - confessor
1666 Catalogue Superior of Mission, lives mostly in Dublin. After 13 months imprisonment was exiled to France for 4 years. Was on the Mission 24 years. Also described as living at Cashel preaching and administering the Sacraments. A powerful adversary of the Jansenists and heretics. Is 2 years on the Mission (Foley thinks this is a nephew)
Report of 1666 is signed by “A Sallus” and he observes “for the last 2 years no one has died in this Mission - no one was dismissed thanks be to God”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was a fellow student with Fathers John Clare and Andrew Lincoln at CAST

1642 A Fourth Year’s Divine at Liège (ANG CAT) - did four years Theology at Liège (1639-1642)
1644 Sent to Irish Mission
1648 Superior at Clonmel
1654 Rector of Irish College Salamanca, succeeding Father Reade in 1651
1666 Superior of Irish Mission residing in Dublin; Imprisoned for 13 months and deported for four years to France;

He was tried for his life twice; “valde bonus, et candidi animi”;
Was on the Irish Mission twenty-four years
Wrote a long life of Fr Yong SJ
(cf Foley’s Collectanea)

Left the following account of the fruit yielded by Irish College Salamanca AMDG :
“Sent to the Irish Mission, in less than sixty years three hundred and eighty-nine good Theologians for the defence of our faith, of whom thirty suffered cruel fortunes and martyrdom; One Primate, four Archbishops, five Bishops, nine Provincials of various religious Orders, thirteen illustrious writers, twenty Doctors of Theology, besides a great number of whose actions and dignities we have not heard, but who are known in Heaven, which has been thickly peopled by the illustrious children of the Church of Ireland”

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Bennet Sall and cousin of Andrew Fitzjohn Sall
Had studied Classics at Clonmel and Cashel under John Young and then went to Belgium and studied Philosophy at Irish College Douai before Ent 20 December 1635 Watten
1638-1642 After First Vows he was sent to Liège for Theology and was Ordained there 19 April 1642
1642-1643 Made Teriianship at Ghent
1643-1649 Sent to Ireland and Clonmel where he taught Humanities
1649-1658 Superior at Cashel Residence until the Cromwellian occupation there when he moved to Waterford (1652)
1658 Arrested and thrown in prison 22 January 1658. Through the intercession of the Portuguese in London an order for his release was sent by Cromwell to the authorities in Ireland, who agreed unwillingly adding other conditions of their own, and he was released 22 February 1659
1659 Joined Thomas Quin in Brittany
1662-1663 Sent to Ireland around the same time as Quin in October, he arrived in Waterford, until his appointment as Superior of the Mission
1663-1666 Appointed Superior of the Mission 13 October 1663 at Dublin. At Dublin where the controversy over Peter Walsh's Remonstrance was uppermost in all minds, he distinguished himself by his defence of the faith and the rights of the Holy See. He was summoned to appear before the Lord Deputy and Council on 11 July, 1664, but as nothing could be proved against him he was freed from further harm. At the National Congregation of the Clergy of Ireland he refused to sign any of the “ Sorbonne Propositions”, 22 June, 1666.
During his term of office, Father Sall wrote reports on the state of affairs in Ireland for the years 1663, 1664 and 1665
1666 On the appointment of his successor 03 July 1666, he returned to his native district to exercise his ministry. It is likely enough he chose to leave Dublin to be near his cousin Andrew Fitzjohn Sall who was already causing anxiety by his failure to measure up to the standard of self-denial in obedience and poverty expected of him by his religious profession. The two cousins were now working in the same district. But if the former Mission Superior tried to influence his cousin in the right direction, his efforts proved in vain. (Fitsjohn Aall apostatised in Cashel 1674 and he died in Dublin 1682)
1675 At the Spring Assizes at Clonmel, 1675, Andrew was summoned to hear sentence of deportation passed on him - he had been cited by the Mayor of Cashel - but as he was unable to attend through illness, he received a respite until the following Assizes. On the next occasion sentence of deportation was deferred. In the event, the sentence of deportation was never executed. But, from the fragmentary records of the Clonmel Assizes of that period we can conclude that twice yearly up almost to the time of his death he had to submit to the harassment of making appearances in Court.
He died at the Cashel Residence 20 January 1686

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962

Andrew Sall (1663-1666)

Andrew Sall, son of Bennett Sall, was born at Cashel on 20th December, 1612. He studied classics at Clonmel and Cashel under Fr John Young: proceeded to Belgium and studied philosophy at Douay. On 20th December, 1635, he entered the Novitiate of the English Province at Watten in Belgium. He made his theology at Liège, where he was ordained priest on 19th April, 1642. After making his tertianship at Ghent, he returned to Ireland in 1644, and was engaged at Clonmel teaching humanities for five years. From 1649 to 1652 he was Superior of the Residence of Cashel, and for the next four years he laboured at Waterford, being for the last half of that time the only Jesuit there, In June, 1654, he made his solemn profession of four vows in Waterford. On 22nd January, 1656, he was betrayed by local spies, and confined in prison. Through the intercession of the Portuguese Ambassador in London an order for his release was sent by Cromwell to the Irish authorities, who granted it very unwillingly, adding conditions of their own. He was released on 22nd February, 1659, and went to Brittany, where he joined Fr Thomas Quin. Returning to Ireland about the same time as Fr Quin returned (October, 1662), he worked at Waterford, until his appointment as Superior of the Mission on 13th October, 1663, brought him to Dublin. At Dublin, where the controversy touching Peter Walsh's Remonstrance kept all minds in a ferment, he distinguished himself by his defence of the faith and championship of the rights of the Holy See. He was summoned to appear before the Lord Deputy and Council on 11th July, 1664, but as nothing could be proved against him, he was freed from further molestation. At the National Congregation of the Clergy of Ireland he refused to sign any of the Sorbonne Propositions (22nd June, 1666). During his term of office Fr Sall wrote reports on the state of affairs in Ireland for the years 1663, 1664, and 1665, After laying down his office of Superior, he continued to labour in the vineyard of the Lord for twenty years at Dublin, where he died on 20th January, 1686.

Addendum (1) Andrew Sall : From a recent accession to the National Library, MS 4908-9, we have been able to establish that Fr. Andrew Sall was living in Clonmel at least between the years 1675-1684.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Andrew Fitzbennett Sall SJ 1612-1686
Fr Andrew Sall, like St Jude, suffered form the disadvantage of having the same name as the traitor, Fr Andrew Sall, who apostatised. For that reason he us usually given the cognomen Fitzbennett, from the name of his father Bennett Sall. He was born in Cashel on November 20th 1612. He studied the classics at Clomel and Cashel under Fr John Young, entering the Society at Watten, in Belgium, in 1635.

On his return to Ireland in 1644, he taught for five years at Clonmel. He then became Superior of the Residence at Cashel 1649-1652. He spent the next four years in Waterford, being for the last half of that time the only Jesuit there.

On January 22nd 1654, he was taken by spies and confined in prison. Through the influence of the Portuguese Ambassador in London an order came from Cromwell for his release, and he was permitted to proceed to Brittany where he joined Fr Thomas Quin.

He was then appointed Superior of the Mission 1663-1666.

At Dublin, where the controversy over Peter Walsh’s “Remonstrance” kept all minds in ferment, he distinguished himself by his defence of the Faith and the Holy See. He was summoned to appear before the Lord Deputy in 1664 but was let free.

At the National Congregation of the Clergy of Ireland he refused to sign any of the Sorbonne Propositions.

Laying down office in 1666, he laboured for twenty years on the Mission, dying in Dublin on January 20th 1686. The scene of his labours was Clonmel, 1675-1684.

Stephens, John, 1602-1671, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2153
  • Person
  • 13 July 1602-06 March 1671

Born: 13 July 1602, Worcester or Gloucester, England
Entered: 17 November 1624, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1633, Liège, Belgium
Final Vows: 04 May 1640
Died: 06 March 1671, Ghent, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Campion and Scripsam

◆ The English Jesuits 1650-1829 Geoffrey Holt SJ : Catholic Record Society 1984
1646-1648 Sent to Ireland

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
STEVENS, JOHN. I meet with two Members of this name. The first was a Reverend Father and an able Scholar, born in Gloucestershire A.D. 1603 : was admitted into the Society at the age of 21 : was professed on the 4th of May, 1640 : was Rector of the English College at Rome from 1659 to 1663 : at the expiration of his office was called to Liege to govern his brethren there for the space of three years. I think he died there on the 10th of February, 1667.

Tasburgh, Thomas, 1675-1727, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2176
  • Person
  • 29 September 1673-05 July 1727

Born: 29 September 1673, Bodney, Norfolk, England
Entered: 07 September 1691, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1700
Final Vows: 21 March 1704
Died: 05 July 1727, Dublin - Angliae Province (ANG)

Son of John and Elizabeth (Darell)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of John and his second wife Elizabeth
Early education at St Omer’s College France
1701 At College of the Holy Apostles, Suffolk
1704 St Ignatius College London, until near the time of his death
He died in Dublin 05 July 1727 in the odour of sanctity and was buried, it is believed, at St Michan’s. Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS states “In a letter of the Rv Dean Meyler, 08 June 1832, from 79, Marlborough St, Dublin, that worthy gentleman says ‘Many miracles were performed at the tomb of this Father, and his remains were, in consequence, almost carried away by the people. There is at present, in the possession of one of the Priests of Dublin, a finger belonging to this very holy man, the applications of which has been followed by many extraordinary and rapid cures, some of them even to my knowledge”.
Father R O’Callaghan’s sister was cured by an application of the above relic (Hogan)
Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS also says :
In connection with this family and Father Thomas Tasburgh’s relic, so famous for the miraculous cures effected by its application, Father Edmund Hogan has sent us the following communication
“In the abbey of Ross Co Galway, over the vault of the Lynches of Ballycurrin, is a slab with the inscription : ‘The arms of ye Ancient Family of Tasburg, of Tasburgh, afterwards of St Peter’s Hall, in ye Manor of Southelman, in Suffolok, now of Felzton in said County (Flixton or Feixtown) ....... This Monument was erected by Ellen Lynch, of Lydican, and wife of Peregrine Tasburgh, who died the 5th February, 1710”.
The late Bishop Blake of Dromore, who preached Father Betagh’s panegyric, collected a great number of cases of cures by Father Tasburgh’s relics, and had an intention of publishing a tract on the subject. The celebrated Dr Cahill was to have his leg cut off by Surgeon O’Reilly, he applied Father Tasburgh’s finger to his leg and disappointed the surgeons.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John and Elizabeth née Darrell
Early education was under the Jesuits at St Omer, France.
After First Vows he followed the usual course of studies in Europe, was Ordained and then returned to work as a priest in England
The circumstances of his arrival in Ireland are simply not known. It may be suggested that he came to for reasons of health or as Chaplain to some Anglo-Irish Catholic household. All that is known with certainty is that he was only a short time in Dublin when he died 05 July 1727
He died with the repute of high sanctity. Nearly a century after his death it was reported that many wonders had taken place at his tomb and that one of his fingers was treasured as a relic by a Dublin priest

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Thomas Tasburh 1673-1727
Fr Tasburg was probably an Englishman, as we find two other Jesuits of the same name listed in the English Catalogues. He is honoured in an Irish Menology, because he was for years attached to the parish of St Michan Dublin, where he died in 1727 on the 6th July, and was buried in the vaults.

Bu the concurrent testimony of many, though not juridically proved, miraculous cures were often effected by the application of his relics. One witness states that Fr Richard O’Callaghan SJ, then living with the family in Church Street, where one of his sisters was for years incurably affected by a spinal disease, he procured a finger of the deceased Fr Tasburg, and with the prescribed prayers applied it to the diseased parts which were immediately cured. The famous Dean Meyler, Parish Priest of St Andrew’s testifies :
“Many miracles were performed at the tomb of this Father, and all his remains were in consequence carried away by the people. There is at present in the possession of one of the priests of Dublin a finger belonging to this very holy man, the application of which has been followed by many extraordinary and rapid cures, some of them to my own knowledge”.

Fr Tasburg was born in 1673 and laboured for some time on the Mission in London before coming to Dublin.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
TASBURGH, THOMAS, joined the Society on the 7th of September, 1691; made a Spiritual Coadjutor on the 21st of March, 1704 : was stationed in London during the early part of the last Century; but for some time before his death resided in Dublin, in great repute for Sanctity. He died in that city on the 5th of July, N.S. 1727, aet. 54. and I think was buried at St. Michan’s. In a letter of the Rev. Mr. Meylor, dated 8th of June, 1832, from 79, Marlborough street, Dublin, that worthy gentleman says, “Many miracles were performed at the tomb of this Father; and its remains were in consequence almost carried away by the people. There is at present, in the possession of one of the Priests in Dublin, a finger belonging to this very holy man, the application of which has been followed by many extraordinary and rapid cures; some of them to my own knowledge.

White, William, 1632-1688, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2258
  • Person
  • 1632-26 February 1688

Born: 1632, Ireland or Carnarvonshire, Wales
Entered: 4 December 1658, Ireland or Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 21 May 1657 pre entry
Died: 26 February 1688 England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Son of John and Mary (Eswards) of Neigwl, LLandegwwning, Caernarvonshire, Wales

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He is mentioned in Fr Morris’s Louvain Transcripts.

(Note the William White who Ent 1601 and was “valetudinarius” in 1621.)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
WHITE, WILLIAM, is said to have died in England on the 26th of February, 1688.

Wright, Joseph, 1698-1760, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2270
  • Person
  • 31 December 1698-14 March 1760

Born: 31 December 1698, Portugal
Entered: 31 March 1720, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Final Vows: 1731
Died: 14 March 1760, Ghent, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Son of Edmund

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries
DOB 30 December 1698 of Irish parents Portugal; Ent 31 March 1720; FV 1731; RIP 14 March 1762 Ghent aged 62 (Necrology)
1720-1730 On the Mission at Wardour Castle, Wiltshire - also was on Mission at Southend
1741 At Liège preparing for the Mission (presumably ANG)
1753 At Norwich

◆ CATSJ I-Y has
DOB 10th or 30 March 1698 Portugal of Irish parents; Ent 30 March 1720; (all CAT 1723)
Peter Wright 30 March 1720 (loose Hogan note)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
WRIGHT, JOSEPH, was admitted on the 31st of March, 1720 : eleven years later was ranked amongst the Spiritual Coadjutors. I find that he was a Missionary at Wardour and Southend, for some time. He died in England on the 14th of March, 1760, aet. 61.

Wright, Matthew, 1647-1711, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2271
  • Person
  • 20 September 1647-22 August 1711

Born: 20 September 1647, Madrid, Spain
Entered: 18 February 1668, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 09 April 1678
Died: 22 August 1711, Dunkirk, Hauts-de-France, France - Angliae Province (ANG)

Son of Sir Benjamin and Jane (Williams) of Cranham Hall, Essex

◆ Came with three others (Charles Petre, Joseph Plowden and Andrew Poulton) under former ANG Provincial, John Warner, in 1689-1690 and was a Missioner in Ireland, Fr Warner as Confessor, the others in schools, and preaching in the country
(Cousin of Charles Petre??)

◆ The English Jesuits 1650-1829 Geoffrey Holt SJ : Catholic Record Society 1984
1684-1687 St Omer
1689-1690 Ireland
1691-1692 Ghent

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
WRIGHT, MATTHEW, admitted on the 18th of February, 1668: was rector of Watten from 1694 to 1698 : occurs Prefect of Studies at St. Omer s College in 1704 : for the Four last years of his life was Rector of Ghent, but actually died at Dunkirk, on the 22nd of August, 1711, aet. 64.