Bordeaux

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Bordeaux

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Bordeaux

38 Name results for Bordeaux

34 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Barnewall, John, 1576-1617, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/893
  • Person
  • 23 June 1576-11 August 1617

Born: 23 June 1576, Stackallen Castle, County Meath
Entered: Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG) (cf Tournai Diary MS n 1016, fol 351, Archives de l’État, Brussels)
Ordained: 04 April 1609, Mechelen, Belgium
Final vows: 1616
Died: 11 August 1617, Drogheda, Co Louth - Romanae Province (ROM)

Studied Humanities in Ireland and also studied in Douay. Taught Grammar and Greek. Master of Arts.
In 1609 came from BELG to AQUIT on matters re Irish Mission
From 1609 to 1611 was in Professed House in Bordeaux
1616 looking after Irish Mission
His father, Robert Barnewall is called “Seigneur de Stackalais. His mother is Alsona Brandon.
He renounced his Stackallen inheritance

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronolgica” :
Son of Robert Lord Stackallen and Alsona née Brandon - he renounced his inheritance of Stackallen
Studied Humanities partly in Ireland and partly with his Philosophy at Douai graduating MA
He is shortly referred to in a letter from Fr Lawndry (Holiwood) to Richard Conway 11/08/1617 (IER Arril 1872 p 292)
He arrived in Ireland in 1617 (??)
Professor of Greek; besides the Breviary he recited daily the Office of the Blessed Virgin; was styled the “poor man’s Apostle”; most zealous and obedient, “omnium virtutum specimen” says Holywood.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Robert and Alison neé Brandon
Had already achieved an MA before Ent 07/10/1599 Tournai
1601 After First Vows spent four years in Regency, then completed his studies at Douai and Louvain and was ordained at Mechelen, 4 April, 1609
1609-1611 At Bordeaux
1611 A member of the Dublin Residence, he exercised his ministry in Kildare, later in Dublin and finally in Drogheda where he died 11 August 1617
Father Holywood in his Annual Letter aluding to Father Barnewall' s death, described him as an 'apostle of the poor'

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father John Barnwell SJ 1576-1614
John Barnwell was born in Stackallen Castle County Meath in 1576 of a noble Norman family which gave many members to the Society. Like William Bathe, John Barnwell renounced his inheritance of Stackallen and entered the Society at Tournai in 1599.

He came to Ireland in 1609 and worked as a missionary in the neighbourhood of Drogheda. He was known as the poor man’s apostle. Besides the Breviary, he recited daily the Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary,

He died near Drogheda in 1617.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BARNEWALL, JOHN, I find by F. Richard Daton s letter from Bordeaux, 13th of January, 1615, that F. Barnewall was then detained in that city by illness, and unfit to proceed to the Mission, where his services were much wanted. But seven years later I find him called to Ireland.

Bellew, Michael, 1825-1868, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/916
  • Person
  • 27 July 1825-29 October 1868

Born: 27 July 1825, Mountbellew, County Galway
Entered: 28 August 1845, St Andrea, Rome, Italy (ROM)
Ordained: 1858
Final vows: 02 February 1865
Died: 29 October 1868, St Francis Xavier's, Upper Gardiner Street, Dublin

Younger brother of Christopher RIP 1867

by 1855 in Palermo, Sicily Italy (SIC) studying Philosophy
by 1856 Studying at St Beuno’s Wales (ANG)
by 1859 at Paderborn Germany (GER) studying Theology
by 1868 at Burgundy Residence France (TOLO) health

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Son of an Irish Baronet (probably the Galway Parliamentarians of the 18th and 19th Centuries). Younger brother of Christopher RIP 1867, but Entered four years before him. Their home was frequently visited by Jesuits, and this helped develop a great love in Christopher for the Society.

He was sent to Rome for his Novitiate, but he was not long there when his strength began to fail. General Roothaan, seeing how valuable a man he might be in the future, sent him to Issenheim (FRA) to complete his Noviceship. When he had completed his study of Rhetoric, he came to the Day School in Dublin, where he trained the boys to great piety. Then he was sent to Clongowes as a Prefect.
1855 He was sent to St Beuno’s for Theology, spending his 2nd Year at Montauban, his 3rd at Belvedere, and his 4th at Paderborn.
After Ordination he was sent to Belvedere for a year.
1860 He was Minister at Tullabeg
1861 He was an Operarius and teacher in Galway.
1864-1867 He was appointed Rector at Galway 26 July 1864, taking his Final Vows there 22 February 1865.
1867 His health broke down, and he was sent to the South of France - James Tuite was appointed Vice-rector in his place. When he returned to Ireland, he stayed at Gardiner St, and died there 29 October 1868.

Bermingham , Nicholas, 1721-1758, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/919
  • Person
  • 26 November 1721-30 June 1758

Born: 26 November 1721, County Galway
Entered: 28 September 1740, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1750/1
Final Vows: 02 February 1756
Died: 30 June 1758, Galway Residence

Alias D’Arcy

First Vows 22 November 1742
1741-1750 At Fontenoy College (AQUIT) - taught Grammar, Humanities and Rhetoric. Studied Theology
1749 at Bordeaux teaching Grammar and Rhetoric
1755-1758 in Ireland where he died

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Taught Humanities and Rhetoric for six years
1752-1755 In Galway
Battersby says he died 30 June 1758 by 1758 is added with a cross before it in HIB Catalogue

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had completed two years Philosophy before Entry 28 September 1740 Bordeaux
1742 After noviceship he completed Philosophy and spent four years Regency at Fontenoy before Theology. Ordained 1750/1
1752 Returned to Ireland and assigned to Galway Residence. He remained there on missionary work until his death 30 June, 1758

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BIRMINGHAM, NICHOLAS. He sometimes passed by the name of Darcy. He was born on the 26th of November, 1721, and entered the Order at Bordeaux, at the age of 19. After finishing his studies and teaching Humanities for six years, he was sent to the Mission, and in that capacity was employed in Galway. But his course was short: for eight years later viz, on the 30th of June, 1758, he was called to receive the reward of his labours.

Bourke, Thomas, 1588-1651, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/932
  • Person
  • 24 June 1588-12 December 1651

Born: 24 June 1588, Limerick City
Entered: 06 October 1607, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: c 1615
Died: 12 December 1651, Limerick Residence

Alias de Burgo

Parents Thomas de Burgo and Jane Arthur were a distinguished family
Studied at Limerick and Douai - became an MA 19 August 1607 : a good classical scholar, reconciling many to the Church, Professor of Theology (Verdier)
1617 Is in France studying Theology at Bordeaux
1621 Catalogue : On the Irish Mission 9 years, has talent and judgement but lacks prudence and experience. Is a valetudinarian and slow. Confessor.
1622 Catalogue In Western Munster
1626 Catalogue : “Thomas Burkeus” in Ireland
1636 has talent but cannot progress due to ill health
1649 Is in Limerick

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries : de Burgo (1) and Burke (2)
(1) de Burgo
DOB 01 July 1580 or 24 June 1588 Limerick; Ent 21st or 06 October 1607 Tournai; RIP Limerick (?) after 1650
Son of Thomas de Burgo and Mary née Arthur
Studied at Limerick and Douai, graduating MA 19 August 1607 -
“A good classical scholar; Professor of Theology; Noted Preacher; Has reconciled many to the Church” - Mercure Verdier, Visitor to Irish Mission
(2) Burke
DOB 1586 Limerick; Ent 1608 Tournai;
Son of Thomas de Burgo and Mary née Arthur
“A good classical scholar; Professor of Theology; Noted Preacher; Has reconciled many to the Church” - Mercure Verdier, Visitor to Irish Mission
Reconciled : Burke is probably de Burgo named in the Diary of Tourney, December 21, 1607 as DOB 24 June 1588; Admitted 19 August 1607 and Ent 21 December 1607 Tournai;
1617 In France
Letter of 04 November 1611 from Thomas Lawndry (Christopher Holiwood) to Mission Superior Richard Conway he is mentioned as assisting Nicholas Leynach in the west part of the Southern Province (Irish Ecclesiastical Record, April 1874)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Thomas and Joanna née Arthur
Studied Humanities in Ireland graduating MA before Ent 06 October 1607
Early years after First Vows not easily traced.
1615 Returned to Ireland as priest but yet to complete his studies.
1616 Sent to Bordeaux to complete his studies.
On his return to Ireland he was assigned to the Residence in Limerick where he spent the rest of his life. For many years he taught Humanities at the Jesuit school there. He died 12 December, 1651

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BURKE, THOMAS, was of a good family, and entered the Society in 1606. F. Verdier reports of him that he was an excellent Classic Scholar - that he had been Professor of Polemic Divinity, and was famed at Limerick, where he was settled, as a Preacher and that he had reconciled many to the Catholic Church. After the summer of 1649, I can trace him no longer.

Buckley, Robert, 1619-1680, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2290
  • Person
  • 14 August 1619-27 July 1680

Born: 14 August 1619, Wales
Entered: 24 August 1640, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1649 Bordeaux
Final Vows: 25 April 1658
Died: 27 July 1680, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

Appears in Old/15 and CATSJ A-H

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BUCKLEY, ROBERT, of Wales, was appointed to the Penitentiary, at St. Peter’s, in October, 1672; died at Rome, 6th July, (another account says 27th of July) 1680, aet. 61, Soc. 40.

Cahill, Philip, 1672-1738, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/998
  • Person
  • 02 July 1672-08 June 1738

Born: 02 July 1672, County Waterford
Entered: 13 October 1710, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Died: 08 June 1738, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1711-1717 at Irish College Poitiers as Cook
1723 Cook and Emptor at Palencia College
1724-1730 at Irish College Poitiers
1733-1738 at Irish College Poitiers
“strong, humble and modest. Rather slow at work”

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
From entry for the next 15 years he was at various houses in AQUIT
1725-1738 Assistant Bursar at Irish College Poitiers. This included a brief sojourn in the Irish Mission in 1731 from which he returned due to ill health. he died at Irish College Poitiers 08 June 1738

Comerfort, Richard, 1580-1620, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1080
  • Person
  • 22 November 1580-21 April 1620

Born: 22 November 1580, Waterford
Entered: 11 January 1605, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1609, Rome Italy
Died: 21 April 1620, Waterford - Romanae Province (ROM)

Alias Comerton

Had studied 2 years Philosophy and 1 year Theology before entry
1609 at Ingolstadt after 4 years Theology repeating studies
1609-1610 Sent to Ireland with Daton and Briones
1610-1611 Librarian at Limoges
1611 at College of Limousin doing Theology
1614 Teaching Theology at Limoges
1615-1616 called to the Irish Mission
1617 in Ireland

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica”
Brother of James 1st and Thomas
1607 Was in Rome and received a letter from his brother James dated Madrid 28 September 1607. He was in bad health that year and Father Archer recommends his being sent to the Irish Mission (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS, who calls him Quemford)
1609 In Bordeaux
1617 He appears in Ireland (IER 1874)
(Comerton entry suggests that he was Rector at Salamanca 1621-1624, but this is more likely to have been James Comerford 1st)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ
Brother of James (Senior) and Thomas (infra)
Had studied at the Irish College Salamanca before Ent 11 January 1605 Rome on the same days as his brother Thomas
1607 After First Vows he was sent to resume Theology studies - most likely in Rome - and was Ordained there 1609;
1609 Arrived with Richard Daton in Bordeaux. Both had been sent to and were on their way to Ireland but in fact both were detained in France for some years.
Richard taught Philosophy for four years at Limoges College
1617 Arrived in Ireland and Waterford where he remained until his death there in 1620

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
QUEMERFORD,RICHARD. He was in bad health at Rome in the autumn of 1607, and F. Archer recommended his being sent to the Irish Mission.

Cormick, Patrick, 1658-1721, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1109
  • Person
  • 11 April 1658-15 November 1721

Born: 11 April 1658, Dublin
Entered: 13 November 1673 - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Professed: 02 February 1691
Died: 15 November 1721, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1675 First Vows 17 November 1675
1687-91 Missioner in Siam

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
First Vows 17 November 1675 AQUIT

Cotter, Patrick, 1659-1721, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1116
  • Person
  • 15 August 1659-18 June 1721

Born: 15 August 1659, County Cork
Entered: 14 September 1681, Toulouse, France - Tolosanae Province (TOLO)
Ordained: 1690, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1697
Died: 18 June 1721, Tulle, Limousin, Aquitaine, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1688-1692 Studies Theology, first at Bordeaux then at Poitiers
1693 at College of Saintes AQUIT teaching Humanities and Grammar
1695 at College Périgord, teaching Humanities, Logic and Physics
1696 Tertianship at Bordeaux
1699 at Agen College teaching Logic
1699-1721 at Tulle College Spiritual Father, Teaching Casuistics
Never returned to Ireland. Gentle, prudent clear judgement excellent teacher and administrator

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Philosophy before Ent 1681 Toulouse
After First Vows he spent five years Regency in TOLO Colleges, and then Transcribed to AQUIT
He resumed studies at Bordeaux but completed them at Poitiers, where he was Ordained 1690
He then returned to teach at Humanities at AQUIT Colleges
1686-1699 Sent to hold a Chair of Philosophy at Périgord and then later at Agen
1699 He volunteered to come to the Irish Mission, but he was sent as Spiritual Director and Professor of Theology to Tulle and spent twenty two years there. He became a noted Preacher and died at Tulle 18 June 1721
Contemporary documents speak of his ability for teaching and governing as well as his success in Preaching and Spiritual Direction

Daton, Richard, 1579-1617, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1166
  • Person
  • 1579-10 July 1617

Born: 1579, County Kilkenny
Entered: 05 November 1602, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1609, Ingolstadt, Germany
Died: 10 July 1617, Slíabh Luachra, Co Cork - Acquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Alias : Downes; Walsh

Had studied 2 years Philosophy before entry
1606 At Ingolstadt (GER) 1st year Theology with now 3 years Philosophy
1607 Came from Venice (VEM) to Germany. Was “repetitor domesticus physicoru”
1609 He and Fr Richard Comerfortius came to Ireland from Germany. Future Superior of Mission
1609-1610 Is at Professed House Bordeaux from Irish Mission
1610-1612 Teaching Philosophy at “Petrichorae” (Périgueux); or He, Richard Comerfort and Thomas Briones sent to Ireland; or in 1611 in Périgueux College teaching Philosophy
1612-1615 Teaching Philosophy at Bordeaux. Destined for Ireland
A Fr Richard Daton is mentioned as having studied at Douai in 1613

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Dayton or Daton alias Downes
1615 At Bordeaux (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
A Writer; A most popular Preacher; In the highest favour and esteem of the people of Limerick for his virtue and learning.
He edited Fr O’Carney’s sermons
(cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Philosophy at Douai before Ent 05 November 1602 Rome
After First Vows he resumed his studies at Rome, but he was sent to Ingolstadt for health reasons, and there Ordained in 1609
1609-1616 He was on his way to Ireland with Richard Comerford but both were held, Daton at Périgueux and Bordeaux by the AQUIT Provincial to teach Philosophy at Périgueux (1610-1612) and Bordeaux (1612-1616)
1616 Returned to Ireland for a very brief time as he was struck down by brain fever. He was very hospitably received by a Catholic noblewomen and and carefully nursed to his death at Slíabh Luachra Co Cork 11 July 1617

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Richard Daton 1579-1617
Richard Daton was born in Kilkenny in 1579. His name is sometime taken as equivalent to Downes, by some authors.

He entered the Society in 1602. He is mentioned as being in Bordeaux in 1607. As a priest he laboured in the Munster area, was a most popular preacher and held in the highest esteem by the people of Limerick for his virtue and learning.

He had some claim to be considered a writer, inasmuch as he edited the sermons of Fr Barnaby O’Kearney SJ.

He died near Slieveclocher County Cork on July 10th 1617.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
DATON, (alias Downes) RICHARD. I meet with him in August, 1607. He was at Bordeaux eight years later.

Dillon de Coughlan, Joseph, 1669-1737, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1185
  • Person
  • 19 March 1669-01 January 1737

Born: 19 March 1669, Athlone, County Westmeath
Entered: 14 January 1687, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1698, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 16 March 1704
Died: 01 January 1737, Limoges, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1689 First Vows 15 January 1689
1693-1694 at Tulles College AQUIT
1695 Teaching Rhetoric at Nantes College AQUIT
1696 Teaching Rhetoric at La Rochelle College AQUIT
1700 Teaching Rhetoric at Poitiers
1703 Teaching Philosophy at La Rochelle
1705 Teaching at Tulles and FV
1711 At Agen College teaching and Preaching. Prefect of the School
1714 At Limoges College
1717 At Bordeaux College
1722-1723 Minister of Irish College Poitiers

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had started Philosophy before Ent 14 January 1687 Bordeaux
1689-1690 After First Vows he was sent to Philosophy to Pau
1690-1696 He was sent for six years of Regency at Tulle, Saintes and La Rochelle. He then studied Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and was Ordained there in 1698
Towards the end of his Tertianship, he asked the General to serve on the Irish Mission. The General was concerned about the political state of the country and so was not inclined to send him there. A little later the General relented, but at that time the Mission Superior did not want any new arrivals, as he believed it might jeopardise the work and lives of those already there.
In AQUIT he had a distinguished career as Professor and later a Missioner.
1722-1723 Minister at Poitiers
Died at Limoges 1727

Durran, Thomas, d 1706, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1240
  • Person
  • d 12 January 1706

Born: Dublin
Entered: Bordeaux, France, in Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT);
Transcribed to Aragon Province (ARA);
Died: 12 January 1706, Valencia, Spain - Aragon Province (ARA)

Ferriter, Peter, 1667-1693, Jesuit scholastic

  • IE IJA J/1284
  • Person
  • 14 June 1667-24 October 1693

Born: 14 June 1667, Ireland
Entered: 15 January 1688, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Died: 24 October 1693, Fontenay, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1688 Taught Grammar at Angoulême
1689-1693 Taught Grammar at La Rochelle AQUIT
First Vows at La Rochelle 16 January 1690

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Probably had some studies done before Ent 15 January 1688 Bordeaux
1690 After First Vows sent to La Rochelle for Regency but then transferred to Fontenoy where he died 24 October 1693

Fleming, Richard, 1542-1590, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1314
  • Person
  • 1542-26 August 1590

Born: 1542, County Westmeath
Entered: 1561, Louvain, Belgium - Franciae Province (FRA)
First Vows: 24 June 1563, Louvain, Belgium
Ordained: 16 December 1569
Professed: 14 June 1576, received by Peter Canisius
Died: 26 August 1590, Pont-à-Mousson, France - Franciae Province (FRA)

1565-1566 Theology in Roman College and German College. Master of Arts
1567 CAT Teaching Logic at Dillingen - sent from Rome by Fr de Borgia. Peter Canisius at Dillingen then - Fleming brought a letter to him from Borgia in Rome
1570 Licenced, Teaching Theology at school. Confessor
1572 At Ingolstadt
1576 Was Professor in France (Vatical Arch Inghilterra). Rector of Bordeaux College
1577 Sought by Fr Genat from Fr General for Pont-à-Mousson
1583 In Pont-à-Mousson teaching Theology Doctor of Philosophy and Theology. Chancellor 1584-1585
Wrote first Catalogue of Irish Saints - published by Fitzsimon
Fr General wrote to him at Bordeaux referring to him as Socius to Maldonatus

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica”
He was a man of great virtue; A Writer; First Chancellor and Professor of Theology at Pont à Mousson, also Professor at Clermont and Paris (succeeding the celebrated Maldonatus)
The Blessed Virgin revealed to him in Paris that Fr Aquaviva would be elected General of the Society (cf Fr Hogan’s Irish list). Sacchini Part V Hist. Soc. mentions this prediction at Paris in 1581, of the election of Fr Claudius Aquaviva as general of the Society. He is mentioned in the “L’Université de Pont-à-Mousson” by Fr Nicolas Abram SJ (publised by Fr Carayon SJ, Paris 1870) - “He was of a noble Irish family and of noble and religious bearing”; Probably the “Richard” mentioned in Shirley’s letters; Stanihurst in “Description of Ireland” 1586 says “..of him I hear agreat report, to be an absolute Divine and Professor thereof”. His name stands first in the list taken from the original in Vol II Anglia Hist. in ARSI. He appeared to Fr Derbyshire after his death.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Richard Fleming 1540-1592
Our most eminent and honoured Theologian of the early years of the Penal times was Fr Richard Fleming. Born in 1540, in what was afterwards known as Westmeath, he came from the family of the Lords of Slane, a family which later have an Archbishop to the See of Dublin. Richard entered rthe Society in 1561, the year the first Irish Jesuit, Fr David Wolfe, landed at Cork.

He became the first Chancellor of the University founded at Pont-à-Mousson by the Cardinal of Lorraine in 1573. Two years later he was called upon to fill the chaor of Theology at the College of Clermont, Paris, vacated by the celebrated Maldonatus. This eminent post he held for nine or ten years, professing with ever increasing success amid the full blaze of Parisian party spirit.

He retired to Pont-à-Mousson wher he died on August 25th 1590. Before his death he had a vision of Our Lady, in which he was lefd into the General Congregation then in session in Rome, and heard Our Lady say to the Electors “Choose Claudio Acquaviva as General”.

Jautard, Jean Clair, 1741-1821, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1474
  • Person
  • 29 May 1741-25 October 1821

Born: 29 May 1741, Bordeaux, France
Entered: 20 September 1756, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Final Vows: 15 August 1821
Died: 25 October 1821, Clongowes Wood College, Naas, Co Kildare

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was a former pupil and penitent of Father O’Halloran
1763 A Regent in 4th year at La Rochelle (Arrêt de la Cour)
1791 Came to seek shelter in Ireland with his old Professor of Philosophy and Confessor, and was received with open arms by the ex-Jesuits and good Catholics of Dublin. When speaking of the Ancienne Compagnie, tears would fill his eyes. Every day he would recite the Litany of the Saints and Blessed of the Society, and shed abundant tears when pronouncing the hallowed names. He entered the Restored Society.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Claude Jautard 1756-1821
At Clongowes College in October 25th 1821 died Fr Claude Jautard, a Frenchman, born at Bordeaux in 1756. He was one of the few surviving Fathers of the Old Society, of which he could seldom speak without shedding tears.

Retiring from political storms, then raging in his native land, he had taken refuge in Ireland, 25 years before his death. At the time of the Restoration, he sought and obtained readmission. He was wont to recite daily a litany compiled from the names of Jesuit Saints and Beati, at the end of which he would ask himself whether his own lot would one day be among these saints in heaven, and on these occasions, he could not restrain himself from shedding copious floods of tears.

He was most faithful in observing common life in its minutest details, and even when far advanced in years and well nigh bent to the ground with age, he would creep out every day to the altar to offer the Holy Sacrifice.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
JAUTARD, CLODIUS, a native of France; but after living sometime at Clongowes, died there on the 25th ot October,1821.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

Kelly, James, 1712-1762, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1513
  • Person
  • 01 May 1712-13 January 1762

Born: 01 May 1712, Ireland or France
Entered: 11 October 1732, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 21 December 1744, Bordeaux, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1749
Died: 13 January 1762, Unknown

Distinguished talent - aptitude for all the sciences. Judgement and prudence beyond his years
1734-1739 Taught Grammar, Rhetoric, Humanities at Bordeaux College
1740 At La Rochelle College teaching
1743 At Bordeaux College taught Rhetoric, Humanities
1749-1761 At Poitiers teaching Rhetoric, Humanities - Talent and proficiency far above the average. Vice-Rector in 1762 at time of suppression

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1755 Professor of Rhetoric at Grand Collège Poitiers. He was also Vice-rector of the Seminary and of the Irish College. (cf Arrêt de la Cour du Parlement de Paris, 1763).
On 11 December 1755 he delivered an address with the view of proving that “To admit all prejudices is an excess of weakness; to reject them all is an excess of rashness” (Mercure de France, April 1756, Vil i, pp 118-120)
1762 Vice-Rector at Irish College Poitiers.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
The fact that his name is never considered in correspondence for the Irish Mission, suggests that he was born or brought up in France of Irish parents but spoke neither English nor Irish.
1734-1736 After First Vows he was sent for Regency to Angoulême
1736-1738 He was then sent to Bordeaux for Philosophy studies, and received Minor Orders there 06 April 1737.
1738-1742 Sent to La Rochelle for further Regency
1742-1746 He was then sent to Bordeaux again for Theology where he was Ordained 1745
The next three years are a little unclear, but at the end of formation he was sent to Grand Collège Poitiers where initially he taught Rhetoric, but later Philosophy and Theology. He was still at Poitiers on the eve of the dissolution of the Society in France. With other Jesuit professors of the Grand Collège Poitiers he was accused by the Gallican and Jansenists on the faculty of Poitiers University of teaching false doctrines. On the death of Stephen Ussher the last Rector, he was briefly appointed Superior before the confiscation.
His name disappears from CATS after 01 February 1762
To judge from the estimates of his character and ability to be found in contemporary catalogi, James Kelly was a highly talented man with extraordinary intellectual ability.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
KELLY, JAMES. I meet with him as Superior of his brethren in Ireland on the 2nd of October, 1684. He was then residing in Dublin. In the years 1697, 1698, 1699, he occurs Rector of the Seminary at Poitiers. In a letter of the 6th of April, 1714, it is stated in general terms that he had died abroad some time before, “indefcssus in Vinca laborator”.

Lavery, Charles, 1670-1725, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1557
  • Person
  • 1670-07 August 1725

Born: 1670, Magheralin, County Down
Entered: 06 January 1698, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1697, Rome - pre Entry
Final Vows: 02 February 1709
Died: 07 August 1725, Dublin - Romanae Province (ROM)

Completed his studies before Ent
1700 At Bordeaux College teaching Grammar
1705 At Xaintes (Saintes) College (AQUIT) teaching Humanities and Philosophy and studying Philosophy and Theology
1706-1708 At Poitiers
1714-1717 At Poitiers Spiritual Father
1717 CAT Good talent, learned and speaks elegantly. It is wished he had greater love of poverty. When on Mission people complained he was irascible and wanting in meekness and humility

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Patrick and Mary of Ulster. Probably a brother of Susan Lavery OSB, a nun, of Dunkirk (Foley’s Collectanea Vol vi p 439)
He was one of James II Demies sent to Magdalen College, Oxford, 1687
Entered the English College Rome for Higher Studies 30 March 1689.
Professor of Philosophy; Eloquent Preacher; Charming in conversation
1708 and 1714 In Ireland (HIB Catalogues)
1717 At Poitiers

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied Irish College Rome and was already a Priest 1697 Rome, before Ent 06 January 1698 Bordeaux
1700-1707 After First Vows he taught Humanities at Bordeaux, Nantes and Poitiers
1707-1714 Sent to Ireland and Dublin and worked in the Dublin district.
1714-1717 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Spiritual Father
1717 Sent to Dublin and worked as an Assistant Priest until his death there 07 August 1725

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Charles Lavery SJ 1670-1717
Fr Charles Lavery was born at Magheralin County Down in 1670. He entered Magdalen College Oxford, as one of James II demie or foundationers At this time great efforts were being made to obtain for the Fathers a firm footing in the University. Although both Christ Church and University College were governed by Catholics, the chief hope was placed in Magdalen, which had been given by the King to his Catholic subjects. In 1688 however, all fifteen demies at the College were expelled. Charles Lavery first went to Rome and entered the English College. He returned to Ireland without taking orders, and he entered the Society in 1697.

He was appointed Professor of Philosophy. In addition, he was an eloquent preacher and a gifted conversationalist. His name is found as having been in Ireland in 1708 and 1714.

He died in Poitiers in 1717.

MacEgan, Florence, 1719-1781, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1626
  • Person
  • 24 April 1719-07 December 1781

Born: 24 April 1719, Ireland or Carcassonne, France
Entered: 24 October 1737, Naples, Italy - Neapolitanae Province (NAP)
Ordained: c 1748, Rome, Italy
Final Vows: 02 February 1755
Died: 07 December 1781, Rome, Italy - Neapolitanae Province (NAP)

1740 College Maximo Naples
1743 At College Theatino (Chieti) NAP - good talent but a fiery temper
1754 At Barletta College, now a Missioner
1758 Not in NAP Catalogue
1757-1758 AT Bordeaux College
1761 At Chieti College teaching Mathematics and preaching - has very good talent. Minister, Concionator, Lector, Missionarius
1767 Expelled from Benevento into the Roman States with 600 Neapolitan Jesuits
1775 Is still alive

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Four Entries : Joseph Malgan (1&2); Florence McEgan (2&3)
(1&2) Joseph Malgan
Died in Rome the same day and is probably identical with Florence McEgan (cf John Thorpe’s letter in Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
(3&4) Florence McEgan
Had been a Captain in the Neapolitan army and had a distinguished bearing before Ent
Rector of Benevento College at the Suppression.
He was reputed and excellent Preacher (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS and Hogan’s List)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
All Catalogue entries described Florence as Irish, except the NAP one which suggested that he had been borne at Carcassone, in France. It is certainly true that he had been educated in France
After First Vows sent for studies in Rhetoric and Philosophy at Naples and then Regency at Chieti
1745 He was sent to Naples for Theology. At the end of his first year he was transferred to Rome and continued his Theology studies and the Roman College and he was Ordained there c 1748.
1749-1750 After completing his studies he was sent to the Professed House in Rome as a Secretary to the French Assistancy
1750-1754 He was sent back to Naples, taught Humanities for two years and then sent to Barletta on Mission work.
1755-1758 Sent teaching to AQUIT, including two years teaching at the Irish College Poitiers.
1758 Sent to Bordeaux as Minister.
1760 Back in NAP he was a Missionary in Chieti and Barletta.
Little is known about his life after the Suppression, and he was in Terracina on the eve of that Suppression, when he wrote in French to some priest colleagues 29 April 1772 of the trials they were dealing with. According to later authorities he died in Rome 07 December 1781

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MAC-EGAN, FLORENCE, was born on the 4th of April, 1719, and was admitted into the Order of the Province of Naples, on the 24th of October, 1737. He was raised to the rank of a Professed Father, on the 2nd of February, 1755, and died at Rome, on the 7th of December, 1781. He had the reputation of being an excellent preacher. See p. 60 of the Second Supplement Bibliothecae Scriptorum Soc. Jesu, Romae. 1816.

MALGAN, JOSEPH. This Irish Father, as I find in a letter of F. Thorpe, died suddenly at Rome, on the 7th of December, 1781; but I can glean no further particulars, and am almost inclined to suspect that this is the same person as F. Mac-Egan.

Manby, John, 1675-1749, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1668
  • Person
  • 01 August 1675-04 October 1749

Born: 01 August 1675, County Derry
Entered: 06 December 1690, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1703, Poitiers, France
Final Vows 1711
Died: 04 October 1749, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Was older brother of Peter Manby - RIP 1752

“Was brother of Peter Manby SJ and a far superior man”
First Vows at Pau 07 December 1692
1694 At Pau College AQUIT studying Logic
1695 At Périgord teaching Grammar
1698 At Tulles College teaching Humanities
1699 James (recte John) At Fontenoy teaching Rhetoric
1700-1723 At Poitiers teaching Humanities, Rhetoric. Subtle intellect, fit to teach Sciences. Acute cultivated mind. Taught at “Magno” College” too
1723 At Bordeaux College teaching Humanities
1730 At Poitiers Infirmus
“John Maachy” (recte John Manby?) 04 October 1749

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Peter (Dean of Derry an afterwards received into the Church). Older brother of Peter
1692-1694 After First Vows he studied Philosophy at Pau
1694-1699 He was sent for Regency at Périgueux, Tulle and Fontenoy, before continuing Philosophy and then studying Theology, both at Grand Collège Poitiers, where he was Ordained
1703 He was sent to teach Humanities at Poitiers, except for two years at La Rochelle.
He died at Poitiers between 1746 and 1749

McGrath, John Xavier, 1702-1755, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1714
  • Person
  • 14 February 1702-25 November 1755

Born: 14 February 1702, Shanakill, Rathgormack, County Waterford
Entered: 12 November 1721, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: c 1732/3, Poitiers, France
Died: 25 November 1755, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1723-1727 Taught Grammar and Humanities (at Poitiers?)/ First Vows 17 November 1726
1727 At Tulles teaching Humanities
1729-1733 Studying Theology at Poitiers
1733-1734 Tertianship at Marans AQUIT
1735-1737 Teaching Philosophy at Fontenoy AQUIT
1738-1740 In Ireland
1740-1742 At Poitiers, Minister and teaching
1743 At Luçon N of Rochelle or Limoges
1744-1747 At Fontenoy College Minister
1752-1755 Superior of Cleracensis (Clavacensi) - Clarens, Switzerland

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
He had already studied Philosophy before Ent 12 November 1721 Bordeaux
After First Vows he was sent on Regency to Tulle, Agen, and Angoulême,
1729-1723 He was sent for Theology first for a year at Bordeaux and then to Grand Collège Poitiers where he was Ordained 1732/3
1733-1735 Tertianship at Marennes and then spent a year at Irish College Poitiers
1735-1737 Taught Philosophy at Fontenoy
1737-1739 Sent to Ireland and Limerick Residence
1739-1742 Sent to be Minister at Irish College Poitiers
1742-1751 Sent on various missions as Minister, Operarius and Missioner in various places of AQUIT
1751-1754 Rector of Irish College Poitiers 26 Ocotber 1751
1754 Sent to Bordeaux due to ill health, and he died there 25 November 1755

Morony, Joseph, 1714-1758, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1770
  • Person
  • 19 March 1714-15 July 1785, Dublin

Born: 19 March 1714, Ballykeefe, County Limerick
Entered: 03 September 1734, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1743, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 04 June 1752
Died: 15 July 1785, Dublin - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Taught Humanities 6 years
1736-1738 & 1740-1741 Taught Grammar
1738-1747 Prefect of Boarders, Teaching Rhetoric, Studying Theology at Irish College Poitiers - Minister 1745-1747
1755 At least from this date in Ireland
1761 In Ireland towards end of 1761 (notice sent by Fr Corcoran & notice on an old stone, on which IHS at Limerick and Morony family
“Wonder if 1739-1740 dates are correct as original MS has 1640-1641 & 1639-1640, and the writer is very orderly”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1746-1785 A Writer and a celebrated Preacher in Limerick, Cork, Waterford and Dublin
Taught Humanities, and was Procurator at Poitiers.
1746 & 1756 In Limerick
In his book, printed in 1796, he is said to have been “lately living in Dublin.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Bordeaux before Ent 03 September 1734 Bordeaux
1736-1739 After First Vows he was sent on Regency teaching to Tulle and as Prefect at the Irish College Poitiers.
1739-1741 Sent on two further years of Regency at Agen and Luçon
1741-1746 Sent for Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and he was Ordained there in 1743
1746-1747 Sent to Ireland and spent a year at Clonmel
1747-1773 Sent to Limerick where most of his working life was spent. At Limerick he proved himself not only a successful schoolmaster but enjoyed a high reputation as a Preacher throughout Munster. According to the census of 1766 he conducted his school at Jail Lane, near Athlunkard St.
1773 At the Suppression of the Society, 1773, he closed his school and went to live in Dublin. He was one of the signatories of 7 February, 1774, Accepting the brief of the Suppression. He died in Dublin 15 July 1785
Such was the esteem in which his memory was held as a preacher that eleven years after his death, two volumes of his sermons were published by the aid of the generous subscriptions of his many admirers

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Joseph Moroney SJ 1714-1785
Fr Joseph Moroney was born on March 19th 1714 at Ballykeefe, Mungret, Limerick. He joined the Jesuits at Bordeaux in 1734.

Twelve years later he was sent to Ireland, where he became famous as a preacher, in Limerick, Waterford and Munster in general, but mainly in Limerick. According to a census, he conducted a school at Gaol Lane, Limerick, but on the Suppression of the Society, the school ceased to function in 1783.

He published his sermons in two volumes. They are plain instructions without any evidence of great genius or eloquence, but then he is not the only great orator who reads rather poorly in print.

Fr Moroney ended his days in Dublin where he died in 1785.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note :
Joseph Morony
Those marked with * were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MORONY, JOSEPH,was born at Limerick, on the 19th of March 1714, and joined the Society at Bordeaux, on the 4th of September, 1734. Twelve years later he came to the Mission, and was placed in his native city. On the 28th of June, 1752, he was numbered with the Professed Fathers. F. Joseph Morony became celebrated as a Preacher in Limerick, Waterford, and several parts of the Province of Munster, and left 2 Vols. of discourses printed in Dublin 12mo, 1796. The 1st Vol. contains 260pp : the 2nd 309 pp. A good judge informs me they were solid instructions in a plain stile, but without any evidence of great genius or eloquence. 1 think he died in Dublin.

Born: 19 March 1714, Ballykeefe, County Limerick
Entered: 03 September 1734, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1743, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 04 June 1752
Died: 15 July 1785, Dublin - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Taught Humanities 6 years
1736-1738 & 1740-1741 Taught Grammar
1738-1747 Prefect of Boarders, Teaching Rhetoric, Studying Theology at Irish College Poitiers - Minister 1745-1747
1755 At least from this date in Ireland
1761 In Ireland towards end of 1761 (notice sent by Fr Corcoran & notice on an old stone, on which IHS at Limerick and Morony family
“Wonder if 1739-1740 dates are correct as original MS has 1640-1641 & 1639-1640, and the writer is very orderly”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1746-1785 A Writer and a celebrated Preacher in Limerick, Cork, Waterford and Dublin
Taught Humanities, and was Procurator at Poitiers.
1746 & 1756 In Limerick
In his book, printed in 1796, he is said to have been “lately living in Dublin.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied at Bordeaux before Ent 03 September 1734 Bordeaux
1736-1739 After First Vows he was sent on Regency teaching to Tulle and as Prefect at the Irish College Poitiers.
1739-1741 Sent on two further years of Regency at Agen and Luçon
1741-1746 Sent for Theology at Grand Collège Poitiers and he was Ordained there in 1743
1746-1747 Sent to Ireland and spent a year at Clonmel
1747-1773 Sent to Limerick where most of his working life was spent. At Limerick he proved himself not only a successful schoolmaster but enjoyed a high reputation as a Preacher throughout Munster. According to the census of 1766 he conducted his school at Jail Lane, near Athlunkard St.
1773 At the Suppression of the Society, 1773, he closed his school and went to live in Dublin. He was one of the signatories of 7 February, 1774, Accepting the brief of the Suppression. He died in Dublin 15 July 1785
Such was the esteem in which his memory was held as a preacher that eleven years after his death, two volumes of his sermons were published by the aid of the generous subscriptions of his many admirers

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Joseph Moroney SJ 1714-1785
Fr Joseph Moroney was born on March 19th 1714 at Ballykeefe, Mungret, Limerick. He joined the Jesuits at Bordeaux in 1734.

Twelve years later he was sent to Ireland, where he became famous as a preacher, in Limerick, Waterford and Munster in general, but mainly in Limerick. According to a census, he conducted a school at Gaol Lane, Limerick, but on the Suppression of the Society, the school ceased to function in 1783.

He published his sermons in two volumes. They are plain instructions without any evidence of great genius or eloquence, but then he is not the only great orator who reads rather poorly in print.

Fr Moroney ended his days in Dublin where he died in 1785.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note :
Joseph Morony
Those marked with * were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
MORONY, JOSEPH,was born at Limerick, on the 19th of March 1714, and joined the Society at Bordeaux, on the 4th of September, 1734. Twelve years later he came to the Mission, and was placed in his native city. On the 28th of June, 1752, he was numbered with the Professed Fathers. F. Joseph Morony became celebrated as a Preacher in Limerick, Waterford, and several parts of the Province of Munster, and left 2 Vols. of discourses printed in Dublin 12mo, 1796. The 1st Vol. contains 260pp : the 2nd 309 pp. A good judge informs me they were solid instructions in a plain stile, but without any evidence of great genius or eloquence. 1 think he died in Dublin.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

Netterville, Robert, 1583-1684, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1825
  • Person
  • 23 October 1583-17 July 1644

Born: 23 October 1583. County Meath
Entered: 23 October 1604, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM) & Naples, Italy - Neapolitan Province (NAP)
Ordained: 1610, Naples, Italy
Final vows: 1624
Died: 17 July 1644, Drogheda, County Louth - Described as "Martyr"

Uncle of Nicholas Nettweville, RIP 1697 and Christopher Netterville, RIP 1651

Originally received into Society by Fr Bernard Olivier on 30 August 1604. Then received 23 October 1604 at Novitiate in Rome , and after 1st Probation 22 November 1604 went to Naples to continue Aged 22
1606-1611 In Naples College studying Logic, 3 years Philosophy and 3 Theology
1617 In Meath Age 35 Soc 13
1621 CAT In Meath Age 38 Soc 17 Mission 7. Strength middling. Good talent and judgement. Not very circumspect. Sanguineus and rather lazy. A Preacher
1625 At Irish College Lisbon
1622-1637 In Dublin district
Master of Arts, Minister 3 years, Irish Mission 12

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was Minister in Naples
1615 Came to Ireland from Sicily
1621 In Kildare
Dragged from his bed by the rebel Parliamentary soldiers at Drogheda 15 June 1649, cruelly beaten with clubs, causing his death four days layer aged 67. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS, IER. Tanner’s “Martyr SJ” and Drew’s “Fasti SJ”)
A most meritorious Missioner (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1606-1612 After First Vows he studied at Naples where he was Ordained 1610, ad then he did for two further years of study at Naples.
1613-1614 Made Tertianship at the College of Massa.
1614-1615 He was sent to Ireland with John Shee, but illness kept him at Bordeaux until 1615
1615-1623 Arrived in Ireland and the Dublin Residence, exercising Ministry in the surrounding Counties of Kildare and Meath.
1623-1625 He set out for Spain bringing a group of Irish Seminarians for the Irish Colleges. On arrival he secured interviews with the Ambassador of England and the secretary of the Prince of Wales for whom negotiations were in progress to conclude a marriage agreement with one of the Spanish Infantas. In these interviews he received reassurances that religious persecution would cease in Ireland as soon as the royal match was made. In August of that same year he went to the Irish College, Lisbon, and during his stay there was accused by the Archbishop of Cashel/Dublin of failing in impartiality with regard to the admission of students from the four provinces of Ireland to the Irish Colleges of the Peninsula. One outcome was that he was called back to Ireland in the Spring of 1625
1625-1641 Returned to Ireland and Dublin until the City was controlled by the Puritans
1641 He was based in North Leinster. He was captured and put to death by Scots Covenanters under Munroe who made an incursion as far as North Westmeath in June and July 1644.
The correct Date of Death is 17 July 1644. Some Jesuit writers gave his year of death at 1649 to coincide with the massacre at Drogheda. It is probable that the Roman necrologist mistook Netterville for Robert Bathe, who died in Kilkenny 1649

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Robert Netterville SJ 1583-1649
Robert Netterville was born in Meath in 1583, brother of Viscount Netterville and uncle of Frs Nicholas and Christopher Netterville. He became a Jesuit in 1604 in Italy.

For the rest of his life he was stationed at our Residence in Drogheda. When that city was besieged by Cromwell, Fr Robert was now an old man and confined to bed with his infirmities. But old age and infirmity did not save him from the fury of the Cromwellians. He was dragged from his bed and trailed along the ground, being violently knocked against each obstacle that presented itself on the way. Then he was beaten with clubs, and when many of his bones were broken he was cast on the highway. Catholics came during the night, bore him away and hid him somewhere. Four days after, having fought the good fight, he departed as we would expect to receive the martyr’s crown.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NETTERVILLE, ROBERT. This venerable old man, rich in labors and merits, was dragged from his bed by the Parliamentary soldiers at Drogheda, on the 15th of June, 1619, and so unmercifully beaten with clubs, that he died four days later “Per domum raptatus, tum fustibus contusus, effractisque ad collum et humcros ossibus (15 Junii, 1649) relictus est semivivus, et quarto post die abiit è vita”.
Ex libro Collectancorum signato F. olim in Archiv, Coll. Angl. Romae. - See Tanner , Drews.

Ó Cahan, Matthew, 1703-1739, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1847
  • Person
  • 21 September 1703-15 September 1739

Born: 21 September 1703, Lisbon, Portugal
Entered: 13 September 1720, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1730, Bordeaux, France
Final Vows: 1737
Died: 15 September 1739, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1733-1737 At Irish College Poitiers teaching Humanities and Rhetoric
of Irish parentage

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education in Philosophy was at Irish College Poitiers
1722-1728 After First Vows he spent six years Regency and Périgueux and La Rochelle.
1728-1732 He then was set for Theology at Bordeaux and was Ordained 1730
1732-1733 He was sent teaching at Agen for a year
1733 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Procurator, where he worked until he died 15 September 1739. He was regarded by his contemporaries as a man of deeply religious virtue
Ignatius Kelly and his successor, Thomas Hennessy both tried to have Matthew assigned to the Irish Mission. This is but one of many instances where Irish Jesuits regarded Jesuits born abroad of Irish parents as belonging potentially to their Mission in Ireland.

O'Connell, Maurice, 1622-1687, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1875
  • Person
  • 1622-31 March 1687

Born: 1622, Castlegregory, County Kerry
Entered: 20 January 1641, St Andrea, Rome, Italy (ROM)
Ordained: 1647, Rome, Italy
Died: 31 March 1687, County Cork

Alias Henriquez

1649 was at Ross in Ireland
1652 Catalogue M Conauld of Kerry and Rome 1641 or 1642 on Mission 1649 is a formed Spir Coad.
1666 Catalogue M Connelle is near Cork catechising and assisting in missionary work. He was once arrested but soon set free.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied Moral Theology for two years. Knew Irish, Italian and Latin.
Taught lower school for three years.
1649 Sent to Ireland and was teaching at New Ross. (HIB Catalogue 1650) Was a great Preacher and “thaumaturgus” (Miracle worker).
1666 Living near Cork working as Missioner, Catechising etc. He was also imprisoned for his faith. (cf Foley’s Collectanea) He had then been on the Mission 17 years.
Eulogised in the Annual Letters 1671-1674, and styled the “Thaumaturgus” of the island. Kerry seems to have been the chief base for his apostolic works. He was cruelly outraged and persecuted, and died at Cork 31 March 1687, aged 72.
No doubt that he was of the “Liberator” family - Daniel O'Connell. He is called “nobilis” in the contemporary account sent to Rome

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Cornelius of Cahir (a townland of Corcoguiney, Killiny parish near Castlegregory) and Maria née Watre (sic).
Three of Maurice's uncles were priests; Richard, afterwards Bishop of Ardfert, Maurice, an Augustinian and Donough a diocesan priest of Ardfert
Had studied Humanities at Bordeaux 1638-1640 before Ent 20 January 1641 Rome
1643-1647 After First Vows he was sent to study at the Roman College and was Ordained there c 1647.
1647-1648 Sent as Minister at Sezze College
1648 Sent to Ireland via Bordeaux and New Ross. He was appointed to teach but as he does not seem to have known any English, it can only be supposed that the schoolboys at New Ross used Irish or spoken Latin as the languages of the classroom. He himself was known to speak Irish, Italian and French. In Mercure Verdier’s Report to the General (1649), he speaks of his zeal and industry.
During the “Commonwealth” period he moved to Kerry, and then after the restoration moved to Cork working there until he died 31 March 1687
While working in Cork he won the veneration of the poor and persecuted amongst whom he was commonly regarded as a “Thaumaturgus” /Miracle Worker”
During the Oates Plot his name appeared on a list of Priests sent to the Government.
A kinsman, Daniel - in religion, Robert, O. M. Cap.- and collaborator in writing the Commentarius Rinuccinianus mentions Maurice in that work.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Maurice Connell SJ 1615-1687
Fr Maurice Connell was born in the Kingdom of Kerry in 1615. He entered the Society in Rome in 1641.

On his return to Ireland he was stationed fors at New Ross, and then at Cork, where he laboured as a missioner and catechist. In the Annual Letters of 1671-1674, he is spoken of as “the Thaumaturgus of Ireland” Fr Oliver says of him “he was truly an eye to the blind, a foot to the lame and a true father to the poor”.

Like his Blessed Master he went about doing good, and like Him, was cruelly outraged and persecuted. He was for some time imprisoned for the faith.

He died on March 31st 1678 at the age of 72.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CONNELL, MAURICE, “genere nobili oriundus”. The Annual Letters from 1671 to 1674, shew how powerful this Father was in word and in work, insomuch that he might be called “hujus Insulae Thaumaturgus”. Kerry seems to have been the theatre of his Apostolic labors. He was truly an eye to the blind and a foot to the lame, and the Father of the poor. Like his blessed Master, he went about doing good; and like him he was cruelly outraged and persecuted. He was living in July, 1675, “sexagenario major”.

O'Halloran, Joseph Ignatius, 1718-1800, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1910
  • Person
  • 24 March 1718-04 November 1800

Born: 24 March 1718, County Limerick
Entered: 15 August 1738, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1748/9, Poitiers, France
Professed: 15 August 1753
Died: 04 November 1800, Townsend Street, Dublin

1749 At Bordeaux College teaching Grammar and Rhetoric 6 years
1757-1758 At Bordeaux College teaching Humanities, Rhetoric, Physics, Philosophy and Logic
1761 At La Rochelle teaching Theology
Generally called Ignatius O’Halloran after found shelter at house of O’Halloran at Karock north of Limerick. In Clinton’s “True Devotion” called Dr O’Halloran Townsend St
In Carlow College there is a “Bonacina” with “Joseph O’Halloran Soc Iesu”
1791 Joseph O’Halloran of Dublin condemned the Oath of Allegiance
On 13th May 1770 Nano Nagle says “Ever since Mr O’Halloran has been here who has been informed of the truth of everything, nobody can interest himself more than he does for its success”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Father Gavin of ANG, is of his family.
1763 Had been Professor of Scholastic Theology at La Rochelle, and living at Rue des Cordiers, Paris, and the “Hotel garni, dit Hotel de S Pierre, chez le Seingneur Pantouffe” (Arrêt de la Cour du Parlement de Paris)
Ferrar’s 1787 “History of Limerick”, p 370, says that “he was born 19 March 1718; Was the elder brother of the famous Dr Sylvester O’Halloran; He was educated at the Jesuit College, Bordeaux, and intended to devote himself to the study of ‘physic’, but after a distinguished course of Philosophy, he entered the Novitiate as a Professor of Philosophy. He was the first to open the eyes of Bordeaux University to the futility of the Descartes principles. While Professor of Rhetoric, he published some fugitive pieces of merit, much applauded. Some of his religious tracts have already been printed. his Lectures on Philosophy were being prepared for press when he was appointed to the Chair of Divinity, in which he made no inconsiderable figure, till compelled by the Revolution of the Society (sic) to return to his native land, where he has distinguished himself by his zeal in instructing the ignorant, and by his talents in the pulpit. His sermons alone, when printed, will be no small gratification to the friends of religion and morality”. (Ferrar was a Protestant)
He went to Cork with Lord Dunboyne.
He was the early Confessor of Thomas Moore, the poet, who speaks of him in his “Travels of an Irish Gentleman”.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Michael and Mary née MacDonnell (of the Clarach family). Elder brother of the celebrated physician and historian, Dr. Sylvester O'Halloran
Had already studied Philosophy before Ent 1738 Bordeaux
1740-1745 After First Vows he was sent for Regency to La Rochelle
1745-1749 Sent to Grand Collège Poitiers for Theology and was Ordained there 1748/49
1749-1756 After his formation was completed he held a Chair of Philosophy at Bordeaux for seven years, and then a Chair of Dogmatic Theology at La Rochelle, and he was still there in 1761 at the expulsion of the Society from France
1763 Returned to Ireland and spent 10 years in Cork, until the total Suppression of the Society. He lived and worked at the Cork residence with Patrick Doran, both of them ministering at St Mary’s Chapel. He was known as a notable Preacher, but also a Catechist with children.
1773 After Suppression, he joined his colleagues in Dublin and signed their formal acceptance of the Brief of Suppression 04 February 1774. He was then incardinated in Dublin and a Curate at Townsend St Chapel (the predecessor of Westland Row) and died in Dublin 04 November 1800
1765 A Bill of Indictment was issued against “Joseph Halloran, Popish Priest and Jesuit (who is the person, along with the local Bishop had the daring insolence, publicly in a Popish Chapel near Shandon Church to set at defiance of the laws of the realm, by reflecting on and attempting to overthrow the fundamentals of the Established Church and in contempt of the indulgence given to Papists by our mild and gracious government) for endeavouring to pervert some of his Majesty’s Protestant subjects, and persuading them to embrace the erroneous doctrines of Popery”. It is possible that the case never came to Court, and there is no record of it. It may have been argued that a Catholic ceremony with doors could not be regarded as a public occasion.
1771 He was again reported for a similar offence “A gentleman of the tribe of Loyola, agreed with his Bishop to have public disputations on the consistency of the two religions. The Jesuit undertook to support the Protestants - the Bishop Popery. This controversy was carried on many days at the Chapel, to the entire refutation of the Protestant divine. The audience testified their joy by repeated shouts for this defeat by the strong arguments f his Lordship (as he is styled among them). This public insult to the laws, though known to every person in the town, did not raise a champion to assist the good-natured Jesuit, either amongst our magistrates or clergy. Alaz! They were employed in their departments, in sharing the loaves and fishes. However, a champion at length appeared - an honest cooper, with more zeal than wit, objected to some tenets urged by the Bishop, to his great confusion and dismay. Thus ended the farce, but the poor cooper paid dearly for his temerity. A party was made against him, who have since driven him to beggary and ruin”.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Joseph O’Halloran 1718-1800
Joseph Ignatius O’Halloran was born in the North Liberties of Limerick in 1718. He was educated at the Jesuit College Bordeaux. He intended to become a doctor of Medicine, but he changed his mind and entered the Society at Bordeaux in 1745.

Appointed Professor of Philosophy, he was the first to open the eyes of the University of Bordeaux to the merits of the systems of Descartes and Newton. He was successively Professor of Rhetoric, Philosophy and Divinity at Bordeaux. Some fugitive pieces of great merit were written by him and were much admired by the University.

On the Suppression of the Society he returned to Ireland. He accompanied Dr Butler (Lord Dunboyne) to Cork and was attached to the North Chapel for years. From Cork he came to Dublin where he died on November 4th 1800, and he is buried the vaults of St Michan’s Church.

The following is an extract from Tom Moore’s “Travels of an Irish Gentleman” :
“I used set off early in the morning to ----- St Chapel, trembling all over with awe at the task that was before me, but resolved to tell the wordy. How vividly do I even at this moment remember, kneeling down by the confessional, and feeling my heart beat quicker as the sliding panel in the side opened, and I saw the meek and venerable form of Fr O’Halloran stooping to hear my whispered list of sins. The paternal look of the old man, the gentleness of his voice, even in rebuke, the encouraging hopes he gave of mercy as the sure reward of contrition and reformation – all these recollections come freshly ever to mind”.

◆ MacErlean Cat Miss HIB SJ 1670-1770
Loose Note : Joseph O’Halloran
Those marked with
were working in Dublin when on 07 February 1774 they subscribed their submission to the Brief of Suppression
John Ward was unavoidably absent and subscribed later
Michael Fitzgerald, John St Leger and Paul Power were stationed at Waterford
Nicholas Barron and Joseph Morony were stationed at Cork
Edward Keating was then PP in Wexford

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
O’HALLORAN, JOSEPH IGNATIUS, born in Limerick, in 1726. After having passed his course of Philosophy with singular reputation under the Jesuits at Bordeaux, he entered their Novitiate. Appointed to the chair of Philosophy in that City, he had the merit and courage of introducing the Newtonian System. Promoted to the Professorship of Theology, he maintained his increasing reputation, until the persecutions of his Order compelled him to return to his native Country. Accompanying Lord Dunboyne to Cork, he spent several years in that City, where attaching himself to the North Chapel, he commenced Public Catechism, was most assiduous in the Confessional, and in preparing Children for their first Communion. He greatly distinguished himself by his talents in the Pulpit and was universally respected as a saintly Missioner, as a man of elevated mind, gentlemanly manners, and most prepossessing in his appearance.
This is the Reverend Father alluded to pp. 79-80 Vol 1. “Travels of an Irish Gentleman in search of Religion” by Thomas Moore Esq.
That he died in Dublin during the month of November, 1800, is certain and probably was buried in the vault of St. Michan s Church, where reposed the ashes of several of his BB.

◆ Fr Joseph McDonnell SJ Past and Present Notes :
16th February 1811 At the advance ages of 73, Father Betagh, PP of the St Michael Rosemary Lane Parish Dublin, Vicar General of the Dublin Archdiocese died. His death was looked upon as almost a national calamity. Shops and businesses were closed on the day of his funeral. His name and qualities were on the lips of everyone. He was an ex-Jesuit, the link between the Old and New Society in Ireland.

Among his many works was the foundation of two schools for boys : one a Classical school in Sall’s Court, the other a Night School in Skinner’s Row. One pupil received particular care - Peter Kenney - as he believed there might be great things to come from him in the future. “I have not long to be with you, but never fear, I’m rearing up a cock that will crow louder and sweeter for yopu than I ever did” he told his parishioners. Peter Kenney was to be “founder” of the restored Society in Ireland.

There were seventeen Jesuits in Ireland at the Suppression : John Ward, Clement Kelly, Edward Keating, John St Leger, Nicholas Barron, John Austin, Peter Berrill, James Moroney, Michael Cawood, Michael Fitzgerald, John Fullam, Paul Power, John Barron, Joseph O’Halloran, James Mulcaile, Richard O’Callaghan and Thomas Betagh. These men believed in the future restoration, and they husbanded their resources and succeeded in handing down to their successors a considerable sum of money, which had been saved by them.

A letter from the Acting General Father Thaddeus Brezozowski, dated St Petersburg 14/06/1806 was addressed to the only two survivors, Betagh and O’Callaghan. He thanked them for their work and their union with those in Russia, and suggested that the restoration was close at hand.

A letter from Nicholas Sewell, dated Stonyhurst 07/07/1809 to Betagh gives details of Irishmen being sent to Sicily for studies : Bartholomew Esmonde, Paul Ferley, Charles Aylmer, Robert St Leger, Edmund Cogan and James Butler. Peter Kenney and Matthew Gahan had preceded them. These were the foundation stones of the Restored Society.

Returning to Ireland, Kenney, Gahan and John Ryan took residence at No3 George’s Hill. Two years later, with the monies saved for them, Kenney bought Clongowes as a College for boys and a House of Studies for Jesuits. From a diary fragment of Aylmer, we learn that Kenney was Superior of the Irish Mission and Prefect of Studies, Aylmer was Minister, Claude Jautard, a survivor of the old Society in France was Spiritual Father, Butler was Professor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology, Ferley was professor of Logic and Metaphysics, Esmonde was Superior of Scholastics and they were joined by St Leger and William Dinan. Gahan was described as a Missioner at Francis St Dublin and Confessor to the Poor Clares and irish Sisters of Charity at Harold’s Cross and Summerhill. Ryan was a Missioner in St Paul’s, Arran Quay, Dublin. Among the Scholastics, Brothers and Masters were : Brothers Fraser, Levins, Connor, Bracken, Sherlock, Moran, Mullen and McGlade.

Trouble was not long coming. Protestants were upset that the Jesuits were in Ireland and sent a petition was sent to Parliament, suggesting that the Vow of Obedience to the Pope meant they could not have an Oath of Allegiance to the King. In addition, the expulsion of Jesuits from all of Europe had been a good thing. Kenney’s influence and diplomatic skills resulted in gaining support from Protestants in the locality of Clongowes, and a counter petition was presented by the Duke of Leinster on behalf of the Jesuits. This moment passed, but anto Jesuit feelings were mounting, such as in the Orange faction, and they managed to get an enquiry into the Jesuits and Peter Kenney and they appeared before the Irish Chief Secretary and Provy Council. Peter Kenney’s persuasive and oratorical skills won the day and the enquiry group said they were satisfied and impressed.

Over the years the Mission grew into a Province with Joseph Lentaigne as first Provincial in 1860. In 1885 the first outward undertaking was the setting up of an Irish Mission to Australia by Lentaigne and William Kelly, and this Mission grew exponentially from very humble beginnings.

Later the performance of the Jesuits in managing UCD with little or no money, and then outperforming what were known as the “Queen’s Colleges” forced the issue of injustice against Catholics in Ireland in the matter of University education. It is William Delaney who headed up the effort and create the National University of Ireland under endowment from the Government.from the Government.

O'Hartegan, Matthew, 1600-1666, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1912
  • Person
  • 1600-02 May 1666

Born: 1600, Limerick
Entered: 08 January 1626, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1633, Bordeaux, France
Final vows: 15 August 1641, Waterford
Died: 02 May 1666, Grand Collège, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Was already a “Jurista”. Had studied 2 years Philosophy and 2 Jurisprudence on Ent
1628 First Vows 09 January 1628
1628-1630 At Pau College AQUIT taught Grammar
1630-1636 At Bordeaux Collège studying Theology, teaching Grammar and Philosophy
1636-1637 Minister at La Rochelle
1637 In Ireland for 4 years
1647-1648 Taught Physics at Bordeaux
1648-1650 At Pau College teaching Philosophy
1650-1651 Minister and Consultor at Périgord Collège; 1651-1652 At Tulle Collège teaching Grammar; 1655-1656 At Poitiers (MIn & Cons)
1656-1657 Superior of Bayonne Mission
1657-1660 At Agen College Consultor and teaching Physics, also a Casuist there
1660-1666 At Poitiers Confessor and later infirmus (Verdier Rector at that time)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
(In Pen) First Vows 09 January 1628; RIP Poitiers 1665 (Sommervogel)
1659 He was probably Superior of the Mission as “Nathaniel Hart” (but this is also ascribed to Richard Shelton, who was Superior of Irish Mission)
He was a much esteemed Agent of the Confederation at the French Court; Prudent, and much liked by the Nuncio in Paris. He had been sent over by the Catholics of Ireland to beg assistance from the King in their distress, the kingdom presenting a scene of general conflagration and bloodshed, the Catholics fighting for freedom of conscience, and their lawful King against the Puritans (Letter of Robert Nugent 24 April 1642). When in Paris the petition of the twenty-five thousand Irish - driven by persecution to St Kitts - arrived. Father Hartegan offered himself as one of two Fathers to be sent for their spiritual relief - Letter of Father Hartegan 30 Marhc 1643 (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
Often mentioned by Nuncio to Ireland Rinuccini
Considered a religious and clever man.
A correspondent of Wadding. Several of his letters are in Carte’s “Ormond” and Mr Gilberty’s works on “Irish History”
He volunteered to help the Irish at St Kitts (cf Foley’s Collectanea).

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already studied Philosophy and Jurisprudence and had graduated MA before Ent 08 January 1626 Bordeaux
1628-1630 After First Vows he was sent on Regency to Agen,
1630-1634 He was then sent to Bordeaux for Theology where he was Ordained 1633
1634-1636 Sent to Pau to teach Philosophy
1636-1637 Sent as Minister at La Rochelle
1637-1642 Sent to Ireland. No record of his work except that he made FV at Waterford 15 August 1641. It may be reasonable to surmise that he was known to the newly constituted “Confederation of Kilkenny”, as he was instructed to represent them the following year in France - the Mission Superior duly notified the General of this business.
1642-1646 Sent to France to take charge of what might be called the Embassy of Ireland in France on behalf of the Supreme Council of the Confederation of Kilkenny. He was at Beziers June 4, Lyon July 15 and settled in Paris as “Agent” August 8th until May 1646 when, having finished or resigned his mission he returned to Bordeaux. He along with Geoffrey Baron (nephew of Luke Wadding OFM) were formally appointed as agents at the French Court.
1646 After he resigned his post, he continued to live in Paris and then moved to Bordeaux. In the course of his court business, he had managed to earn the distrust of Queen Henrietta, wife of Charles I. Letters on the Queen and supposedly written by O’Hartegan were seized and published in London. They were considered a forgery, however they were also used as a favourite weapon of counter-diplomacy, and even the Supreme Council were not convinced that O’Hartegan had written them - the originals of which were never produced.
1648 Two years after his return to Bordeaux, The General Carafa asked the AQUIT Provincial to summon a Meeting of Consultors to choose a priest of their Province to conduct an extraordinary Visitation of the Irish Mission, and O’Hartegan was invited to take part in the consultation. The choice fell on Mercure Verdier, who possibly owed some of his grasp of the political-religious situation in Ireland to O’Hartegan.
He was never to return to Ireland and was sent to teach at various Colleges in AQUIT. he taught Philosophy at Bordeaux (1646-1648), at Pau (1648-1650) and Agen (1657-1660) . He conducted weight AQUIT business at Paris, and briefly was Superior at Bayonne.
1660 He was sent to Grand Collège Poitiers as Operarius, and he died there 02 May 1666

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
O'Hartegan, Matthew
by Aoife Duignan

O'Hartegan, Matthew (1600–66), Jesuit priest and confederate agent, was born in August 1600 in Limerick. Originally intending to pursue a lay career, he studied philosophy and jurisprudence, and was awarded an MA, but subsequently entered the Society of Jesus at Bordeaux on 8 January 1626. After a short period of regency at Agen, he began theological studies at Bordeaux in 1630. He was ordained in spring 1633, and thereafter became professor of philosophy at Pau. He was transferred as minister to the college of La Rochelle in 1636, and at the end of that year was assigned to the Irish mission. There are no records of his term in Ireland, except that he made his solemn profession at Waterford, on 15 August 1641. He acted on behalf of the Catholic Confederate Association in Paris in 1642, and he and Geoffrey Barron (qv) were officially appointed agents to the French court by the supreme council on 23 July 1643. His efforts to ensure the continued support of France and to procure aid involved him in contact with the papal nuncio in France, Grimaldi, Cardinal Mazarin, and Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.

In March 1645 the confederate supreme council expressed concern at a number of letters allegedly written by O'Hartegan, which criticised the influence on the council of Charles I's viceroy, James Butler (qv), marquess of Ormond. Although the council stated that it believed the letters to be forged, O'Hartegan's suitability to act for the association was increasingly called into question, with concerns over his ‘vanitye, and exaltation of himselfe’ and ‘disrespect and scandalous calumnyes by him’ (Gilbert, Ir. confed., iv, 205). He also alienated Henrietta Maria, who doubted the sincerity of his desire for peace.

In regular contact with GianBattista Rinuccini (qv) in Paris, he organised the nuncio's passage to Ireland. Rinuccini discussed the possibility of O'Hartegan's returning to his religious duties in October 1645; he ultimately finished or resigned his agency in Paris in May 1646 and returned to Bordeaux. Despite this, he retained an interest in developments in Ireland, and continued to voice his suspicions about the integrity of royal intentions. The general of the Society of Jesus, Father Caraffa, made a request to the provincial at Bordeaux 1648 to choose a priest for an examination of the Irish mission. O'Hartegan was deeply involved in this process, and the ultimate choice, Mercure Verdier, owed much of his familiarity with the complex politico-religious situation in Ireland to O'Hartegan. However, O'Hartegan was never again recalled to the Irish mission. He held a number of posts in his own province of Aquitaine, including professor of philosophy at Bordeaux (1646–8), and at Pau (1648–50). In the mid 1650s the general of the society expressed concern about the spiritual welfare of Irish inhabitants on the island of St Kitts, prompting O'Hartegan's offer to settle there; however, he does not appear to have gone to the West Indies. He held the professorship of philosophy at Agen 1657–60 and also conducted much weighty business for his province at Paris, briefly acting as superior at Bayonne. In 1660 he was assigned to the Grand College of Poitiers where he served as operarius until his death on 2 May 1666.

Francis Finnegan, ‘A biographical dictionary of Irish Jesuits in the time of the society's third mission, 1598–1773’, Milltown Park MSS, Irish Jesuit Archives, Dublin; G. Aiazzi (ed.), The embassy in Ireland of Monsignor G. B. Rinuccini, archbishop of Fermo, in the years 1645–9, trans. Annie Hutton (1873); Gilbert, Ir. confed., iii, 68–73, 107–9, 186, 233–4, 261; iv, xx–xv, 1, 36–38, 119, 203–6, 377–8; HMC, Report on Franciscan manuscripts preserved at the convent, Merchants' Quay, Dublin (1906), 150, 197, 201, 231; NHI, iii (1976), 598; L. McRedmond, To the greater glory: a history of the Irish Jesuits (1991), 67, 82; J. Lowe (ed.), Clanricarde letter book (1993), 149; Micheál Ó Siochrú, Confederate Ireland, 1642–1649: a constitutional and political analysis (1999), 51, 263

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Mathew O’Hartegan SJ 1600-1666
Fr Matthew O’Hartegan was born in St John’s Parish Limerick, and he entered the Society in 1626.

Together with Frs Michael Chamberlain and Thomas Maguire, he was appointed Chaplain to the Confederate Forces in Ireland in 1642.The same year he was sent by the Confederation of Kilkenny as accredited Irish Agent to the King of France. A great deal of controversy exists as to the success of his mission. At any rate, he was recalled in 1645.

The rest of his life was spent in the Province of Aquitaine, to which he belonged. He died at Poitiers about 1666.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
O’HARTEGAN , MATTHEW. A letter of F. Robert Nugent dated from Ireland, the 24th of April, 1642, shows, that F. Hartegan had just been sent over to France by the Catholic National Association, and the Bishops, to solicit the aid of his Most Christian Majesty. He states that Ireland presented a spectacle of general conflagration and bloodshed, and that the Catholics were fighting for freedom of conscience, for their legitimate King, and for their country, against the Puritans. F. Hartegan during the year he spent in this negotiation displayed much ardour; but his success was not equal to his expectations. This may have been owing to the extreme illness of Cardinal Richlieu. Another object was then taken up in Letter keeping with his religious profession. I learn from his own letter, dated Paris, the 30th of March, 1643, that Pere Jordan Forrestier, the Procurator of the Provinces of France, had placed in his hands on the 25th of March, the petition of 25,000 Irishmen, who by the persecution and iniquity of the times had been forced to expatriate themselves, and settle in St. Kitts, and the adjoining isles. Their petition had been brought over by the French Admiral Du Poenry, who backed their petition for two Irish Jesuits to be sent to them to administer the consolations of Religion to their destitute and afflicted countrymen. F. Hartegan offered himself for this Mission, and represented his vigour of constitution, his knowledge of the Irish, English, and French languages, and his vehement desire of labouring in this or any other similar Mission. Probably his wish was granted, for afterwards he disappears altogether.

Perryman, Robert, d 1635, Jesuit scholastic

  • IE IJA J/1978
  • Person
  • d 09 March 1675, Poitiers

Entered: 1655, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Died: 09 March 1675, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

◆ CATSJ I-Y has
Ent 1755 Bordeaux
1755-1757 At Irish College Poitiers

Plunkett, Patrick, 1704-1733, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1990
  • Person
  • 1704-26 December 1733

Born: 1704, Connaught
Entered: 13 September 1720, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: c 1732, Poitiers, France
Died: 26 December 1733, Galway Residence - Romanae Province (ROM)

At time of entry the only Connaught man in the Society (Ignatius Roche letter of 1732)
1723-1727 at College of Pau AQUIT teaching Grammar
1727-1729 At Limoges teaching Humanities and Rhetoric
1729 At Angoulême
1729-1733 At Irish College Poitiers studying Theology

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1722-1724 After First Vows he was sent to study Philosophy at Pau
1724-1729 He was then sent on Regency teaching at Limoges and Angoulême.
1729-1733 At the request of the Irish Mission Superior he was then sent to Grand Collège Poitiers for Theology and was Ordained there c 1732
1733 Sent to Ireland following repeated prayer and requests, but died three months later at the Galway Residence 26 December 1733. He had been in poor health during his studies

Plunkett, Thomas, 1627-1697, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1992
  • Person
  • 1627-26 February 1697

Born: 1627, Dublin
Entered: 11 November 1647, Kilkenny
Ordained: c 1654, Bordeaux, France
Died: 26 February 1697, Dublin Residence, Dublin

1650-1653 Studied Theology at Bordeaux (1651 Age 25 Soc 3 - had good talent and proficiency more than mediocre. Fit to teach Grammar and Philosophy, and above mediocre in Theology)
1653-1654 Studied Theology at Poitiers
1654-1655 Taught Grammar ad Philosophy at La Rochelle
1655 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar
1656-1660 At La Rochelle, now a priest, Age 31 teaching Grammar
1660-1661 At Angoulême
1661-1662 At Agen
1663 Teaching 2nd Class at Bordeaux
1665 At Tulles Age 36
1666-1667 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar
1667-1669 At Loudun Operarius
1670 Goes to Ireland or from 1669

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1650 Sent for Theology to AQUIT

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
He had already completed his Philosophy studies before Ent 11 November 1647 Kilkenny
After First Vows was sent to Bordeaux for studies and was Ordained there c 1654
1655-1667 For the next twelve years he taught at various AQUIT Colleges and was an Operarius until he was sent to Ireland
1669 Sent to Ireland and Dublin, where he worked mostly outside the city until after the Oates Plot. He died at the Dublin Residence 27 February 1697 and was buried at the St. Catherine's churchyard

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
PLUNKETT, THOMAS. Began his Noviceship at Kilkenny. After taking the simple Vows he was sent, as I find in F. John Young’s letter, dated Galway, April 20th, 1650, with Daniel Dowgan, or Dugan, to the Province of Aquitaine, to study Theology. From that time until the announcement of his death in Dublin, on 26th February, 1697, I can learn nothing of his Biography.

Reade, Simon, 1672-1731, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2030
  • Person
  • 01 January 1672-01 February 1731

Born: 01 January 1672, Dublin
Entered: 31 July 1696, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1703/4, Poitiers, France
Died: 01 February 1731, Dublin Residence - Romanae Province (ROM)

Studied 2 years Philosophy and 3 Theology, and taught Grammar in Society
1703-1706 Minister and in Theology at Poitiers
1706-1707 Tertianship at Marans
1707-1710 At Residence Saint-Macaire AQUIT teaching Humanities and Prefect of the Church
1711-1715 Spiritual Father at Poitiers
1717 Catalogue Prof 4 Vows. Is now with a noble family in the country giving edification. Is grave and modest, good judgement and a lover of poverty, chastity and obedience. Talent for Mission work and fit to be a Confessor. Assigned to ROM Province
Some of his books printed after 1696 are at Clongowes

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1717 In Ireland, living with some gentleman’s family, and a zealous and solid religious.
Entries in old books show he belonged to the Dublin Residence.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education was at Irish College Poitiers, and he had already commenced Priestly studies there before Ent 30 July 1696 Rome
1698-1701 After First Vows he was sent for a year of Regency to Sezze College, and then, and the instructions of the General, sent for Philosophy to Lyons (LUGD)
1701-1706 Sent to Grand Collège Poitiers (AQUIT) to continue his Theology studies and where he was Ordained 1703/04. During this time he served as Minister at the Irish College.
1706-1707 Made Tertianship at Marennes
1707-1711 Sent teaching Humanities at St Macaire, near Bordeaux. he was also Prefect of the Church at St Macaire.
1711-1715 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Spiritual Father
1715-1725 Sent to Ireland for health reasons and worked in the Dublin area, working from the house of a nobleman in the Dublin area.
1725 Assistant Priest in a Dublin city parish and he died there 01 February 1731

Sarsfield, John, 1599-1623, Jesuit scholastic

  • IE IJA J/2090
  • Person
  • 1599-22 July 1623

Born: 1599, County Cork
Entered: 17 May 1620, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaine Province (AQUIT)
Died: 22 July 1623, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaine Province (AQUIT)

Studied Rhetoric and Philosophy
1622 In Irish College Poitiers Age 23
1623 At Bordeaux in 1st year Theology Age c22 Soc 3

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1621 Sent to Bordeaux for studies

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had previously graduated MA at Bordeaux before Ent 17 May 1620 Bordeaux
1622 After First Vows he remained in Bordeaux for theology. He showed promise of exceptional brilliance in Theology, but contracted consumption there and died 22 July 1623

Saurin, Matthew, 1828-1901, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/394
  • Person
  • 12 February 1825-10 May 1901

Born: 12 February 1825, Duleek, County Meath
Entered: 24 September 1849, Amiens, France (FRA)
Ordained: Maynooth - pre Entry
Final vows: 15 August 1862
Died: 10 May 1901, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly

by 1855 at Moulins College (LUGD) for Regency
by 1865 at Bordeaux Residence France (TOLO) health
by 1870 at Mongré Collège, Villefranche-sur-Mer (LUGD) working
by 1886 at Charleroi Belgium (BELG) Teaching

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
He entered Maynooth for his own Diocese, and was a classmate of the future Bishop, Dr Nulty. After Ordination he felt a different call and applied to the Society.

After First Vows he was sent to Tullabeg where he taught Grammar for two years.
He then returned to France for further Regency.
1857-1865 He returned to Ireland, and he taught at Belvedere, Limerick and Clongowes.
1865 He was at the Bordeaux Residence.
1866-1869 He was back in Ireland in Milltown and Gardiner St.
1867 The famous “Convent Case : Saurin v Star” was tried was tried in the English Courts, in which Matthew’s sister, A Mercy Sister, took an action against her Superioress and Community of the Mercy Convent Hull for the harsh treatment of expulsion. (cf https://archive.org/details/greatconventcase00joseuoft/page/n3/mode/2up) It was decided that Matthew should live outside the jurisdiction of the Courts, lest he be called as a witness, and so he lived in the Continent.
On his return home he was stationed at Dublin.
1872-1884 He was sent to Tullabeg as a Missioner for twelve years.
1884-1889 He was at Clongowes and Mungret, except for a year that he spent at Charleroi in Belgium.
1899 Early in this year he had an accident at Clongowes, when he fell down the steps near the Dispenser’s Office and broke his hip. It was apparently impossible to set it properly, with the result that he could no longer walk. After a very active life - he was a very keen sportsman which he called “Hunting” - it was a very difficult transition for him. However, he never complained, though on one occasions, being told that the Novices had gone out for a walk, he said “Oh, how I wish I could go out too”, and then added with a flash of his old humour “Horses and dogs!”
He died at Tullabeg 10 May 1901 deeply regretted by all who knew him, as his bright humorous ways made him a welcome addition to every community.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Matthew Saurin SJ 1825-1901
At Tullabeg on May 10th 1901 died Fr Matthew Saurin, deeply regretted by all, for he was a man of bright and humorous disposition, which made him a welcome addition to the various communities he lived in..

He was born at Duleek on February 12th 1825 and was ordained priest at Maynooth for his native Diocese of Meath. Shortly after his ordination, he felt the call to religious life and accordingly entered the Society in 1849.

Fr Saurin’s main work in the Society was as a missioner on the Mission Staff, in the couse of which he was stationed at Tullabeg for twelve years. On retiring from the strenuous work of a missioner from 1884-1899, he was stationed at Mungret and Clongowes. It was in the latter house that he met with an accident to his hip bone. At age 74 it was impossible to set it properly, and from then on he was deprived of the use of his legs.

After a very active life that he had led, for he took a very keen interest in al kinds of field sports which he called “hunting”, this life of inactivity must have been very irksome to him. However, he never complained. Once only was he ever heard to make a remark which showed he felt the tedium of his illness. One day he was told that the novices had gone out for a walk. “Oh” he said “how I wish I could go out for a walk too”. But immediately, he added with a flash of his old humour, “However, if Almighty God has need of my legs He is welcome to them”.

Shein, Thomas, 1633-1663, Jesuit scholastic

  • IE IJA J/2122
  • Person
  • 1633-24 February 1663

Born: 1633, County Limerick
Entered: 20 February 1654, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Died: 24 February 1663, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

On Entry, talent very good, judgement prompt and mature - fit to discharge any duty in the Society
1655-1657 At Bordeaux teaching Grammar
1658 At Pau College (or Bordeaux) teaching Humanities
1659-1660 At Angoulême teaching 1st class. “Has a subtle mind - very proficient in Philosophy and Humanities. Polite learning. Prudent beyond his years.
1665 Not in AQUIT Catalogue

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
He was probably studying Philosophy at Bordeaux before Ent 20 February 1654 Bordeaux
After First Vows he was sent on Regency to a College in Bordeaux (1656-1658) and then at Angoulême before returning to Bordeaux for Theology. He died before Ordination 24 February 1663

Sheridan, John Brinsley, 1840-1877, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/400
  • Person
  • 20 October 1840-23 February 1877

Born 20 October 1840, Trim, County Meath
Entered: 04 September 1863, Milltown Park, Dublin
Ordained: 23 July 1871
Died: 23 February 1877, Milltown Park, Dublin

by 1865 at Bordeaux Residence France (TOLO)
by 1869 at Rome Italy (ROM) studying Theology
by 1870 at Angers France (FRA) health

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Had studied Humanities and Philosophy at Maynooth before Entry.

After first Vows he was sent to Clongowes for Regency, and here it emerged that his health was not very robust, and so he was sent to France for rest.
He was then sent to the Roman College for Theology, but he had to stop that and went to Aix-en-Chapelle (Aachen) recovering his health.
He then returned to Milltown to complete his studies and was Ordained there 23 July 1871.
Until his death 23 February 1877 he was a confirmed invalid, and so he remained at Milltown for the rest of his days.
He was very gently and remarkable for his devotion to the Holy Angels.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father John Brinsley Sheridan 1840-1877
Fr Sheridan was born in Trim County Meath on October 26th 1840. He studied Humanities and Philosophy at Maynooth, where he was distinguished for his piety He entered the Society at Milltown Park in 1863.

The years spent at Clongowes showed that his health was far from robust, and he was sent to France for a change and rest. He then went on to Rome to study Theology, but was compelled to give up study, and he retired to Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen) for a year.

He returned to Milltown in 1870, and the following year he was ordained priest. Until his death seven years later, he was a confirmed invalid.

He died in February 1877, being remarkable for his devotion to the Holy Angels.

Stritch, John, 1616-1681, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2162
  • Person
  • 1616-11 January 1681

Born: 1616, Co Limerick
Entered: 22 July 1640, Bordeaux, France (AQUIT) - Aquitainiae Province
Ordained: 1648, Galway
Died: 11 January 1681, La Rochelle, France - Aquitainiae Province

Alias de Stricke

1646 At La Rochelle teaching Grammar
1648 Went to Ireland with Frs Mercurian and Verdier (Fr Verdier returned before 1649, for in this and the following year he taught Theology at Bordeaux)
1651 AQUIT CAT On the Martinique Mission
1666 CAT Is living at Limerick where he revived the Sodailty of BVM. He teaches Humanities, is Preaching, Catechising and administering the Sacraments. Was on the Mission in the Indies 12 years. On Irish Mission 4 years.
1666 Thomas Stritch SJ teaches school
1670 Fr Stritche was in Ireland, Limerick or Ennis (Arch Ir Coll Rome I 85-87)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1648 At Bordeaux
1649 Came to Ireland with Mercure Verdier - Visitor to Irish Mission - and was Ordained by the Nuncio
Twelve years a Missioner in West Indies
1662-1666 In Limerick, Preaching, Catechising, administering the Sacraments and teaching Humanities. (HIB CAT 1666 - ARSI)
He had extraordinary adventures, which are told in Hogan’s “Irish Exiles in St Kitt’s”.

◆ Fr John MacErlean SJ :
1647 Teaching at La Rochelle and chosen to accompany Fr Mecure Verdure as Socius and interpreter for his Visitation of the Irish Mission
When the Irish Visitation was finished he returned to France for further studies and then volunteered for the West Indies Mission, where there were thousands of Irish exiles who needed spiritual support.
1650 Arrives in Martinique and went from there to Guadaloupe to work with the Irish, English and negro people
1662 Failing health necessitated return to Europe.
1663-1679 Came to Ireland and worked in Limerick, and then was banished to France at the time of the Titus Oates plot in 1679
1680 Arrived at La Rochelle in poor health and died the following year there

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had made Priestly studies and graduated MA probably at Bordeaux before Ent 1640 Bordeaux
After First Vows he was sent teaching in AQUIT Colleges for six years, and was then designated as a travelling companion for Mercure Verdier on the occasion of his Visitation of the Irish Mission 1648-1649.
After Verdier and Stritch’s arrival in Ireland, John was Ordained Priest by the Nuncio at Galway.
During the Visitation of the Mission he was interpreter for Father Verdier. At the end of the Visitation, he returned with Verdier to France and was assigned to the task of completing his theological studies at Bordeaux.
1650-1662 He had volunteered for the missions and arrived in Martinique in 1650. From there he travelled on to Guadelupe where he worked among the Irish, the English and the negroes until in 1662 failing health forced him to return to Europe
1663-1679 Came to Ireland and worked in Limerick, and then was banished to France at the time of the Titus Oates plot in 1679
1680 Arrived in poor health at La Rochelle and died there the following year 11 January 1681

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father John Stritch SJ 1616-1681
Fr John Stritch was born in Limerick in 1616. He entered the Society at Bordeaux in 1640.

While teaching at La Rochelle in 1647 he was chosen to act as Socius and interpreter to Fr Mercure Verdier during his Visitation of the Irish Mission.

His studies completed he volunteered for the West Indies Mission. Arriving at St Kitt’s he was welcomed and bless by the Irish slaves there, heard the confessions of 3,000 of them and then passed on disguised as a timber merchant to Mount Serrat where great numbers of Irish were employed as woodcutters. He revealed his real character to the, and he spent the mornings administering the Sactraments, and the day in hewing wood to throw the dust in the eyes of the English. Meanwhile, the heretics, jealous of the religious consolations of the Catholics of St Kitts, transported 150 of them to Crab Island and left them to die of starvation. Fr Stritch got together as many of the Irish in St Kitts as he could, and he passed with them to the French island of Guadeloupe, where he lived a long time with them, now and then going in disguise to help the Irish on the other islands. He converted in his excursions about 80 Protestants a year.

Owing to ill health he retired to Ireland in 1662 and laboured in Limerick where he revived the Sodality of Our Lady.

In 1679 he was banished to France owing to the Titus Oates Plot and he died at La Rochelle in 1681.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
STRICH, JOHN,* quitted Bourdeaux with Pere Verdier, 2nd November, 1648: was obliged to wait at Rochelle for five weeks until a sea-worthy ship could be procured : sailed thence on the 5th of December, and after a rough and stormy voyage reached Galway, on the 28th of December, that year, when I lose sight of him.

Strong, Peter, 1564-1629, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2161
  • Person
  • 03 February 1564-28 August 1629

Born: 03 February 1564, County Waterford
Entered: 24 July 1614, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 23 March 1602, Bordeaux, France - pre Entry
Died: 28 August 1629, Waterford Residence

Alias Stronge

Parents Richard and Catherine Walsh
Studied Grammar in the public schools at Waterford
1617 In Ireland Age 50 Soc 3
1621 Age 58 in Soc 6. Not strong. Talent and judgement middling. Is prudent. Rather phlegmatic. Confessor and takes good care of domestic matters
1622 In East Munster
1626 In Ireland
A stray Hogan slip “became a Jesuit in 1614 and died in August 1628

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Richard and Catherine née Walshe
He and John Copinger were educated at Bordeaux (Calendar of State Papers - Irish) and was ordained there by Cardinal Sardis Archbishop of Bordeaux and Agen, and Primate of Bordeaux. He had previously studied Humanities for seven years at Waterford - perhaps that school of the famous Peter White (cf Foley’s Collectanea) All this before Entry in 1614, and he was received by Father Scibani Provincial of Flanders 24 July 1614,
1617 and 1626 On the Irish Mission

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Richard and Catherine née Walsh
He had done his Priestly studies at Bordeaux and was Ordained there 23 March 1602 before Ent 28 July 1614 Mechelen. There is no record of his career between this latter date and his admission to the Society except that in 1604 he was still at Bordeaux and acting there as agent for Father Holywood.
1615 While still a Novice he was sent to Ireland and Waterford, where he worked until his death 28 August 1629

Ussher, Stephen, 1701-1762, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2199
  • Person
  • 22 June 1701-10 January 1762

Born: 22 June 1701, Dublin
Entered: 09 November 1718, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained: 1731, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1736, Dublin
Died: 10 January 1762, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Alias Nevill

Grandnephew of John Ussher - RIP 1698

Family had provided two Bishops in Ireland : Anglican Bishop Henry Ussher and Anglican Primate James Ussher

1720 First Vows 11 November 1720 at Pau AQUIT
1720-1723 Philosophy and Theology in AQUIT
1727 At Luçon Seminary under the name of “Neville” teaching Grammar, Humanities and Rhetoric
1727-1732 At Irish College Poitiers studying Theology and in charge of Boarders
1732-1733 Tertianship at Marennes AQUIT
1734-1745 Stephe Neville (vere Usher) is on Irish Mission. Usher is mentioned in Richard Kirwan’s letters (1750-1754) as at Poitiers. He also metions F Reilly and F Cahill as connected with that house.
1745-1751 Rector at Irish College Poitiers
1752 Rector At Irish College Rome
1755-1762 Rector Irish College Poitiers with Thomas Brennan Minister, Thomas Gorman Operarius and William Nowlan Temp Coadjutor

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Three Entries (1&2) Stephen Ussher; (3) Stephen Nevill

(1&2) Stephen Ussher
DOB Ireland; Ent c 1739 Rome or AQUIT (in pen); RIP 1762

1752 In Rome having come 16 October 1751 (in pen)

“Arret de la Cour” says : “Etienne Ussher of the Irish College, Poitiers, died February 10, 1762”

(1) Stephen Nevill
DOB probably Cork; Ent c 1720 AQUIT;

1728 AT Irish College Poitiers in 2nd year Divinity. (CAT of Irish College Poitiers)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
DOB 22 June 1701 Dublin; Ent 09/11/1718 Bordeaux; Ord 1731 Poitiers; RIP 10/01/1762 Poitiers

Son of Patrick and Elizabeth née Creagh (or Nulty?), and grandnephew of John

He had a classical education at Irish College Poitiers before Ent 09 November 1718 Bordeaux

1720-1733 After First Vows he was sent for studies to Pau. He then was sent for four years Regency to AQUIT Colleges, after which he was sent to Grand Collège Poitiers for Theology, and he was Ordained there 1731.
1733-1746 He was sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence, becoming the Superior there in 1736. During this time he also served as a Curate at Mary's Lane Chapel.
1746-1751 Sent as Rector to Irish College Poitiers
1751-1754 Rector of Irish College Rome being replaced 14 June 1754
1754 Sent back to Poitiers to act as Rector again. He died in Office a few weeks before the dispersal of the community due to the dissolving of the Society in France 10 January 1762

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
USHER, STEPHEN. With regret I have to admit that I have barely recovered his name.

Wesley, John, 1662-1721, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2238
  • Person
  • 06 March 1662-20 March 1721

Born: 06 March 1662, County Kildare
Entered: 07 September 1682, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1691, Poitiers, France
Final Vows: 02 February 1700
Died: 20 March 1721, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Studied Philosophy and Theology 7 years in Society
1689-1694 At Irish College Poitiers studying Theology
1694-1695 At Bordeaux on Tertianship
1695-1696 At Fontenoy teaching Grammar - had a talent for Mathematics and History
1697-1698 At Tulles teaching Logic and Physics. Consultor.
1698-1705 At La Rochelle teaching Grammar and Operarius. Prefect of studied and Casuist (1702-1703) and Professor of Lower Schools
1705-1709 At Irish College Poitiers, Minister and Procurator
1711-1716 At La Rochelle, prefect and teaching Humanities, Philosophy and Moral Theology
1717-1718 At Irish College Poitiers
1718-1720 At Fontenoy College, Prefect and again at Poitiers as Minister
1720-1721 At Irish College Poitiers teaching Grammar, Humanities and Philosophy. Prefect of Higher School. Has good judgement and is modest and grave. Tenacious of his own opinion

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica”
There are two very similar Entries (1) John Clare and (2) John Wesley - which follow one another
(1) John Clare
DOB 1662 Kilkenny; Ent 07 September 1682; RIP post 1685
Mentioned in ANG Catalogue 1685 (when he was in Liège, which was ANG, where Wesley was); Left Ireland in 1684
(1) John Wesley
DOB 1662 Leinster; Ent 07 September 1682; RIP post 1717
Professor of Philosophy
1708 Procurator of Irish College Poitiers (in pencil)
1717 At Irish College Poitiers
Mentioned in ANG Catalogue 1685 (when he was in Liège, which was ANG, and Clare is said to be the same) and is called “Wisely, a Kildare name, and the dates 1660 and 07 September 1683 are given (presumably as DOB and Ent?)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1684-1692 After First Vows he was sent for studies to Liège and then Grand Collège Poitiers (AQUIT) where he was Ordained 1691
1692-1696 After studies were completed he made Tertianship, and was then sent to teach Humanities at Fontenay.
1696-1698 He was sent to teach Philosophy at Tulle.
1698-1706 He was then appointed Prefect of Studies at la Rochelle
1706-1710 He was then sent as Procurator to Irish College Poitiers
1710-1716 He was sent back to La Rochelle as Prefect of Studies.
1716 He was sent as Minister to Irish College Poitiers, and he died there 20 March 1721
Wesley always kept up an interest in the Irish Mission. And from the cryptic correspondence of the period we can deduce that he had come into an inheritance which he wished to be devoted to a Jesuit mission in Kildare. But in 1708 the time was not appropriate for such a venture.