Antwerp

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45 Name results for Antwerp

39 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Archdekin, Richard, 1619-1693, Jesuit priest and scholar

  • IE IJA J/875
  • Person
  • 16 March 1619-31 August 1693

Born: 16 March 1619, County Kilkenny
Entered: 20 September 1642, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 28 March 1648, Louvain, Belgium
Final vows: 09 December 1657
Died: 31 August 1693, College of Antwerp, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLA)

Alias MacGiolla Cuddy

Son of Nicholas Archdekin and Anne Sherlog. Read Humanities in Ireland and Philosophy at Louvain
1649 in Tertianship at Mechelen
1650 Returned in Roman Cat age 34 having read 4 years of scholastic Theology
1671 Professor of Scripture at Antwerp (Louvain?) and was published - also taught Scripture, Humanities, Theology and Philosophy
Abbé Henegan says RIP 1690; Another account in suggests Ent 1649
Monument at Thomastown Kilkenny

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Nicholas and Ann née Sherlock
Studied Humanities at Antwerp and Lille under the Jesuits before Ent, and four years Theology in the Society. He knew Latin, Irish, English and Flemish.
1650 Teaching Humanities (HIB Catalogue 1650 - ARSI)
1653 Arrived at Professed House Antwerp, 26/03/1653, and Taught Humanities for six years and was a Professor of Philosophy, Moral Theology and Sacred Scripture, chiefly at Louvain and Antwerp, where he died. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS; and for his writings de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”)
Writer; Professor of Theology and Sacred Scripture. (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Nicholas and Anne neé Sherlock
He studied humanities in Ireland and Antwerp and on the completion of his philosophy studies at Louvain, entered the Society at Mechelen.
Having studied theology at Louvain he was Ordained priest there 28 March 1648.
Recalled to Ireland, he taught Humanities at Kilkenny until the fall of that city to the Cromwellian forces.
On his return to Belgium he continued to teach Humanities.
1657-1690 Professor of the ecclesiastical sciences :
1657-1665 Philosophy Antwerp, Sacred Scripture and Hebrew at Antwerp
1665-1674 Sacred Scripture, Hebrew and Moral Theology at Louvain
1674-1690 Prefect of ecclesiastical studies, Scripture and Moral Theology at Antwerp
1690-1693 On his retirement he continued to live at the College of Antwerp where he died 31 August, 1693.
The writings of Richard Archdekin were read in probably every theologate of Europe.
His most famous work was the “Praecipuae Controversiae Fidei” which went into many editions in his lifetime. The 1686 edition contains biographical notices of Blessed Oliver Plunket and Archbishop Peter Talbot.
Notable too amongst his works is his treatise on miracles composed with special reference to favours received through the veneration of relics of St. Francis Xavier which were kept at Mechelen. This book is said to be the first known to be printed in Irish and English conjunctively.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online
Archdekin (Ardsdekin, MacGiolla Cuddy), Richard
by Terry Clavin

Archdekin (Ardsdekin, MacGiolla Cuddy), Richard (1619–93), Jesuit priest and scholar, was born 16 March 1619 in Kilkenny city, son of Nicholas Archdekin and his wife Ann (née Sherlock). After being educated at the classical school in Kilkenny, he travelled to Antwerp (1637) to study theology at the Jesuit college there before moving to Louvain (1640), where he studied philosophy. Already proficient in Irish, English, and Latin, he became fluent in Flemish. On 20 September 1642 he entered the Society of Jesus at Malines (Mechelen) before returning to Louvain (1644) to resume his study of philosophy. He was ordained a priest on 28 March 1648 and, after completing his tertianship, returned to Ireland in summer 1649 to join the Jesuit mission there. Presumably he would have been a member of the teaching staff of a college that the Jesuits intended to establish in Kilkenny, but these plans were dashed by the invasion of Ireland by a militantly anti-catholic English protestant army under the generalship of Oliver Cromwell (qv). Archdekin was soon obliged to flee to Galway, which held out until 1652, after which he managed to slip away and (after a period in hiding) eventually found a ship bound for the Continent. He landed in the Spanish Netherlands on 26 March 1653.

Thereafter he pursued a successful academic career on the Continent, being first appointed to teach humanities at Malines and Alost (Aalst). In 1657 he became professor of philosophy at the Jesuit college in Antwerp and continued as such until 1662, when he began teaching scripture and Hebrew. He moved (1665) to the Jesuit college at Louvain, where he taught scripture, Hebrew, and moral theology before serving as professor of scripture and moral theology at Antwerp from 1664 until his retirement in 1690.

He also wrote a number of works, and his first publication, A treatise of miracles (1667), was printed in both Irish and English. When writing in Irish he used the pseudonym MacGiolla Cuddy. In 1671 he published Vita et miraculorum sancti Patritii Hiberniae, which included a life of St Patrick (qv) and also elaborated on prophecies attributed to St Malachy (qv). The same year he published Praecipuae controversiae fidei, a practical guide for missionary priests in Ireland. It included material on theology, philosophy, the catholic rite, secular and ecclesiastical history, sermons, and religious instruction. In particular it incorporated many references to Irish affairs. The first edition of 1,000 copies was sold out within months and it went through eleven editions in his lifetime. The 1686 edition was retitled Theologia tripartite universa and expanded on the preexisting material to include lives of the martyred archbishop of Armagh, Oliver Plunkett (qv) and of Peter Talbot (qv), archbishop of Dublin. In 1700 an error was uncovered in his teaching on philosophical sin, and as a result the book was placed on the prohibited index. This error was corrected in subsequent editions. He died at Antwerp 31 August 1693 and was buried in the Jesuit graveyard there.

Webb; Crone; T. Wall, ‘Richard Archdekin's catechetical hour’, IER, no. 70 (Jan.–June 1948), 305–15; Boylan (1988 ed.); Dictionary of catholic biography (1962); ODNB

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Richard Archdekin 1618-1693
Richard Archdekin came of a distinguished Kilkenny family, being born in that city in 1618. He made his early studies at Antwerp and Lille, and finally entered the Society in 1642.

Form most of his life he lectured at Louvain and Antwerp in Philosophy, Moral Theology and Sacred Scripture. He was a voluminous writer. From his pen we have : “A Treatise on Miracles”, written in English and irish, the famous “Theologica Tripartita”, “The Life and Miracles of St Patrick”, “The Mirac les of St Francis Xavier”, and the most useful and influential of all his works, a translation of the Catechism of St Peter Canisius.

Hed died full of works and ripe in merit and age at Antwerp on August 31st 1693.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
ARCHDEACON, RICHARD, was born in Kilkenny in 1619. He was admitted into the Society of Jesus at Mechlin, at the age of 23, and in due time was enrolled among the professed Fathers of the Order. After teaching Humanities for six years, and Philosophy, Moral Divinity, and Scripture for a very long period, chiefly at Louvain and Antwerp, he died in the last mentioned city, about the year, 1690, according to Harris (p. 203, Writers of Ireland) We have from the pen of this Rev. Father:

  1. “A Treatise on Miracles”, written in English and Irish, 8vo. Louvain, 1667. In the Annual Letters of Ireland of 1673, mention is made of a book, quem de S. Xaverii miraculis edidit Anglice P. Richardus Archdekin .
  2. “Theologia Tripartita Universa”. 8vo. Louvain, 1671. During the Author s life this useful work was frequently reprinted.
  3. “Vitae et Miraculorum S. Patricii Epitome”. 8vo. Louvain, 1671. I am un able to describe the book : but a copy at the sale of Mr. Bradish s Library, in the summer of 1829, was deposed of by Jones, Trinity Street, Dublin, for eight Guineas.

Balligan, Michael, 1680-1731, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2284
  • Person
  • 1680-06 September 1731

Born: 1680, Antwerp, Belgium
Entered: 05 October 1699, Mechelen, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)
Died: 06 September 1731, Halle, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)

◆Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries

DOB 1680 Antwerp; Ent 05/10/1699 Mechelen;
Son of Michael and Catherine née de Hertoghe
Made his Humanities at Antwerp under Jesuits.
Admitted by FLAN Provincial Havet, September 1699, and then went to the Novitiate at Mechelen 05 October 1699 (Mechelen Novitiat Album Vol vi p 109)

Bermingham, John, 1570-1651, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/920
  • Person
  • 27 July 1570-15 October 1651

Born: 27 July 1570, Galway
Entered: 19 January 1607, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: November 1607, Antwerp, Belgium - pre Entry
Final vows: 1620
Died: 15 October 1651, Galway Residence

1611 4 years in Soc and 2nd year Theology - good religious, not academic. A businessman suitable as Minister or Procurator in an Irish Seminary
1620 Superior of Galway Residence; FV
1621 has studied Moral Theology
1622 in Connaught
1649 in Galway
1650 knows languages has been a Catechist and Confessor of many years

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Thomas and Helena, née Kirwan
Studied at Douai and was Ordained at Antwerp before Ent 19 January 1608 Tournai
1613 Returned to Ireland on completing his studies at Berghe-Saint-Winoc, France. On his way home he was arrested at Dunkirk but was released and made his way safely to Galway. The rest of his missionary life was spent in Galway city where he died 15 October 1651
A notable relic of the Old Society in Ireland is the chalice which John presented to the Galway Residence in 1620 and is still preserved at Coláiste Iognáid, Galway.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father John Bermingham 1570-1651
John Bermingham was born in Galway on 27th July 1570 and entered the Society at Tournai in 1607.

He worked all the time he was in Ireland in Connaught and was Superior of the Galway Residence. In 1649 he is mentioned as being almost an octogenarian.

He had a high reputation for sanctity. Living to a very old age he became incapable of active work, and spent the last years living with his own family in County Galway.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BIRMINGHAM, JOHN In 1649, this Rev. Father was an Octogenarian, and in high repute for sanctity, “vir plane Sanctus”. Incapable of active service, he was then living with his family in the Co. Galway.

Boyton, William, 1610-1647, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/941
  • Person
  • 15 August 1610-13 September 1647

Born: 15 August 1610, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 27 September 1630, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1637, Antwerp, Belgium
Died: 13 September 1647, Cashel, County Tipperary - described as Martyr

Son of Edward Boyton and Helen Suetonia (Sutton?)
“I studied in Ireland under Fr John Shee, then Philosophy at Lille with the Jesuits from 1627-30. Admitted to Society in Flanders Belgian Province at Brussels 20 September 1630 and then at Mechelen 28 September 1630”
1633 at Louvain
1636 at Antwerp
1638 at Castrensi Mission - (Chaplain to the army?)
1639 at Brussels College
Killed 13/09/1647 at Cashel - hacked with swords by lunatic soldiers in Church of Cashel, or shot near B Virgin’s altar while hearing confessions

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Edward and Helen Sueton (Sutton?) - Mechelen Album
Early education in Ireland with John Shee SJ then went to St Omer from 1627-1630. He was then admitted to the Society by James Stratius, BELG Provincial, at Brussels 20 September 1630, from where he went to the Mechelen Novitiate. (Mechelen Album, Brussels and Arch. de l’État, Brussels, vol ii, p 518).
He was a Martyr for the Catholic faith - cut down,,or, as others say, shot near the Blessed Virgin’s altar in the Rock of Cashel, while hearing confessions. The soldiers who killed him especially marked out Priests for death. (cf Drew’s “Fasti”).
Had been a military Chaplain in Holland.
1649 Came to Ireland (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Edward and Helen née Sweetman
Received his early education from John Shee. Then in 1627 went to the Jesuit College at Lille to study Rhetoric before Ent 27 September 1630 Mechelen.
1632 After First Vows he was sent for studies in Philosophy at Louvain and Theology at Antwerp, where he was Ordained 1637.
1638 His Tertianship at Lierre was interrupted by war and he served as a military chaplain until Summer 1639.
1639 Sent to Ireland and the Cashel Residence. He taught in the School and worked in the Church there.
1647 He died in the Cashel massacre of 13 September 1647 while hearing confessions for the beleaguered at the Cathedral Church. He was stabbed to death near the altar of the Blessed Virgin.
His name is on the list of Irish Confessors and Martyrs submitted for beatification to the Holy See.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father William Boyton 1609-1647
Fr William Boyton was born in 1609 and entered the Society at Mechelen in 1630.

His short life as a Missionary in Ireland was crowned by a martyr’s death at Cashel during the Confederate War. When the town was captured by the Parliamentarians under Lord Inchiquin, “Murrough of the Burnings”, the garrison, together with priests and religious and citizens withdrew to the Cathedral, which occupied a strong position on the famous Rock of Cashel. Here they held out until overcome by numbers.

“As the enemy forced their way in, Fr Boyton exhorted all with great fervour to endure death with the constancy for the Catholic faith, and was wholly occupied in administering to them the sacrament of penance. The enemy, finding him at this work, slew the father with his children. But God avenged the unworthy death of His servants, and by a magnificent sign, showed the cruelty of the massacre.

A Garrison of heretical troops was stationed on the Rock. On a certain night, an old man of venerable aspect appeared to its commander, and taking him by the hand, led him forcibly to the top of the Church tower, and asked him how he dared so impiously to profane that holy place. And as he trembled and did not answer, he flung him down into the cemetery below, where he lay half-dead and with many bones broken, until the following day, when having fully declared the divine vengeance which had overtaken him, he expired”.

(“Sufferers for the Catholic Faith in Ireland”, Myles O’Reilly, p 214)

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
BOYTON, WILLIAM. We know little more of this Father than that he was barbarously murdered by the Parliamentary troops, at the taking of Cashell, on the 13th of September, 1647.

Bray, Francis, 1584-1624, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/949
  • Person
  • 04 October 1584-16 October 1624

Born: 04 October 1584, Clonmel, County Tipperary
Entered: 18 July 1614, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 10 April 1611 Salamanca, Spain - pre Entry
Died: 16 October 1624, At Sea off the Belgian Coast - Flanders Province (FLAN)

Had studied 5 years Humanities; 2 years Philosophy and 2 years Theology on entry (Ord 10 April 1611); then studied 2 years Theology in the Society
1617 at Rome
1622 at Bourges College for preaching and Mission
1624 Killed in naval battle

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1617 Appears to have been in Rome (Irish Ecclesiastical Record, August 1874)
Had been stationed at Cork and Rome.
He was a Navy Chaplain; A man of great piety and courage;
Killed by a canon ball in a naval battle between the Spaniards and the Dutch; He was “the soul of the fight”, and there Spaniards, when he was shot, blew up the ship.
(cf An Account of his heroic death in “Imago Primi Saeculi” and “Historica Societatis”)
Catalogue BELG (FLAN) reports his death in “Missione Navali”
Cordara calls him “Strenuus in paucis et praelii quasi fax atque anima”.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son John and Ann, née Whyte
Had already studied at the Irish College Salamanca where he was Ordained 1611 before Ent 18 July 1614 Rome.
1616-1618 After First Vows he completed studies at Naples, Italy
1618-1621 Sent to Ireland and to Clonmel to work with Nicholas Leynach (or Cork with Edward Cleere?), but only spent three years there due to ill health
1621-1623 Stationed at Antwerp, he served as a military Chaplain
1623 Richard Conway (Rector of Seville) asked for him to be sent to Seville. The General agreed but asked that he be detained at Flanders until he should have a travelling companion as information had been received that Bray had discussed affairs of state with the Duke of Buckingham in England on his way from Ireland to Flanders. Bray was also advised by the General to decline respectfully any request from O'Neill to conduct political business. By Summer 1624 Bray had not yet set out for Spain and in the event never returned there. He was killed in a naval engagement between the Dutch and Spanish off the Belgian coast in October, 1624.
According to the eulogy of his career, circulated in the Flanders Province after his death, Francis Bray was reckoned as eminently fitted for his work as a chaplain as he had a ready mastery of Irish, English, French, Flemish, Spanish and Italian, all of which languages were spoken by the different nationalities in the Spanish army. To his gift of tongues he joined a remarkable zeal for souls and was able to bring the consolations of religion even to the most dissolute of the soldiers. During his three years at Antwerp he received some 600 Protestants into the church.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Francis Bray 1584-1624
Fr Francis Bray was born in Clonmel on October 4th 1584, the son of John Bray and Anne White. Already a priest, he entered the Society at Rome in 1614.

He was sent to Antwerp, where he became Chaplain to the soldiers who were pouring into the Low Countries on the expiration of the truce between Spain and Holland, April 19th 1621. He received a special message of congratulations for the General Fr Mutius Vitelleschi on the marvellous success of his ministry with the troops. Here he came in contact with the Irish Brigade under Owen Roe O’Neill, and became a fast friend of the future Irish Leader. He received an offer for the foundation of a Jesuit College in Ireland.

In 1624 he became Naval Chaplain to the Spanish Fleet. As a result of a naval engagement the Spanish Fleet got tied up in the “Roads of the Downs” between Dover and Ramsgate. Fr Bray made valiant attempts to get help, going twice to London and once to Brussels. Finally on October 15th, the Dutch attacked. Fr Bray was on the flagship. He held aloft the crucifix, crying “It is for King and the Faith”. He rushed to the assistance of the Captain who had been wounded, and both fell dead, killed by the same cannon-ball.

Cassidy, Bernard, 1714-1788, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1034
  • Person
  • 29 September 1714-11 June 1788

Born: 29 September 1714, Ireland
Entered: 07 September 1735, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 24 March 1742
Final Vows: 02 February 1753
Died: 11 June 1788, Thame Park, Oxfordshire, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

Alias Stafford

1768 was at Wackworth, Banbury, England (poss Warkworth)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Cassidy alias Stafford (Uncertainty about his real name, the Provincial’s Note-book says vere Stafford, and the 1754 Catalogue says vere Cassidy)
Educated at St Omer before Ent
1746 On the London Mission
1758 On the Mission of Oxburgh, Norfolk
1771 Superior of St Mary’s Residence, Oxford (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
1779 On the Dorchester Mission, near Oxford
On his tombstone “IHS, Bernard Stafford, died July 12th, 1788, aged 76” (Reverend TG Lee, DCL, FSA) and a copy of that inscription on the floor of the chapel at Thame Park. As it is most improbable that he would have been buried under his assumed name, this monumental inscription may be taken as convincing evidence that his real name was Stafford. In the brief notice of Warkworth, Northampton, which formerly belonged to the Holman family, and then passed by an heiress to the Eyres of Derbyshire, it is stated that the only Father of the Society that could be traced there was father Bernard Stafford alias or vere Cassidy, who was residing at Warkworth 1764, and subsequent years, finally at Thame Park, where he died June 11 1788. It is further stated that Mr Holman, the Squire of Warkworth, married the Lady Anastasia Stafford, probably a sister or near relative of Father Stafford. The family connection may have been a reason for Lady Holman’s retaining Father Bernard as Chaplain.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
STAFFORD, BERNARD, (his true name was Cassidy) : he was born in Ireland during the month of December, 1713. At the age of 22 he entered the Novitiate at Watten : and was admitted to the Profession of the Four Vows in London in 1753. For some time he resided at Thame Park, where he died on the 11th of June, 1788. His services on the Mission well deserve remembrance and imitation.

Creagh, Peter, 1612-1685, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1121
  • Person
  • 1612-17 November 1685

Born: 1612, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 27 September 1635, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 07 April 1640, Antwerp, Belgium
Professed: 1654
Died: 17 November 1685, Limerick

Alias Piers Crow

His father John was an alderman in Cashel. His mother was Elizabeth Flemine
Studied at Cashel, then Lille, Louvain and Douai under Jesuits
1642 at Lyra (Lier FLA)
1644 First came to Irish Mission
1654 a formed Spiritual Coadjutor
1655-1658 at Arras College (FRA) teaching
1666 Living near Limerick teching Grammar, Catechising and administration - then banished to France for 6 years

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of John and Elizabeth née Flemme. Uncle of Dr Creagh, Archbishop of Dublin.
Early education was at Cashel and then studied Humanities under the Jesuits at Lille and two years Philosophy at Douai at Anchin College before Ent. He was admitted to the Society by the FLA Provincial Frederick Tassis, and Brussels 28/09/1635 (Mechelen Album)
After First Vows he did three years Theology taught Humanities for five years
1642 At the Professed House in Antwerp (FLA Catalogue)
1644 Came to Irish Mission (HIB Catalogue 1650 - ARSI)
1666 Living near Limerick, teaching Grammar and Catechism, and administering the Sacraments
He was an exile in France for six years and on the Mission for twenty-five (HIB CAt 1666 - ARSI)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John (Alderman) and Elizabeth née Fleming
Studied Humanities under lay masters at Cashel and later at the Jesuit College of Lille. He then began Philosophy at Douai before Ent 1640 at Mechelen
After First Vows he was sent for his studies at Antwerp and was Ordained there 07/04/1640
1641-1642 Tertianship at Lierre (Lier)
1644 He sent to Ireland and to the Limerick school to teach Humanities.
1652-1660 Under the “Commonwealth” he was deported to France, where he taught Humanities at Arras College and later Prefect at Bourges
He returned to Ireland again after the restoration, and sent first to Cashel, but then in 1666 until his death he worked as a teacher and catechist at Limerick, where he died 17 November 1685

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Piers Creagh 1612-1685
Piers Creagh was born in Carrigeen Castle 3 miles form Limerick on the Robborough Road in 1612. He was a nephew of the Primate Martyr, and a brother of the Mayor of Limerick who distinguished himself during the siege. Another brother was Domestic Prelate to Alexander VII.

Piers entered the Society in 1637. He was attached to our College in Limerick as a Master, as we find in the examination of Fr Netterville of October 1678. Later he taught at Poitiers, where he had as his pupil his nephew Peter, later Bishop of Cork and finally Archbishop of Dublin.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CREAGH, (or Crow) PETER, was 33 years of age in 1649, and then residing at Limerick

Cusack, Henry, 1579-1647, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1153
  • Person
  • 1579-02 November 1647

Born: 1579, Dublin
Entered: 19 September 1605, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1610, Antwerp Belgium
Final Vows: 31 March 1624
Died: 02 November 1647, Dublin

Studied in Ireland and Douai becoming Master of Arts. Studied 3 years Moral Theology at Antwerp
1609 Teacher of Grammar
1610 was a Priest
1611 In 3rd year Theology; Came to Ireland
1622 was in Belgium
1629 Rector in Dublin
1611 Catalogue BELG Moderate abilities, tenacious in own opinion. Does not know Irish but would be useful on Irish Mission. Agreeable manner would make a good Minister or Procurator
1621 Catalogue On Irish Mission with good health, talent and judgement. Always calm, sermons are praised. Would be a good Superior

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Henry and Mary née Brandon
Studied Humanities for six years partly at Antwerp and partly at Douai, graduating there MA.
Admitted to Society by Father Manoereus, Provincial of Belgium (Tournay Diary p 617, No 1016)
He is named in the letter of Father Lawndry (Holiwood) to the Superior of the Irish Mission 04/11/1611, by which stage he was continuing studies. (IER April 1874, p 292)
Professor of Greek; A good Preacher; Rector in Dublin 1629
(cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Henry and Margaret née Brandon
Had studied at Antwerp and later at Douai where he graduated MA before Ent 19 September 1605 Tournai
After First Vows he was sent to Antwerp for studies and was Ordained there in 1610
1611 Sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence, but returned to Belgium to complete his studies at Louvain 1621-1622
1622 Came to Dublin and was initially Rector at the College in Back Lane. Though this College did not last long, he remained in Dublin all of his further life up to his death, and indeed stayed in the city during the mass expulsions of 1641-1642. He died in Dublin 02/11/1647
While in Dublin he offered strenuous opposition to the mischief-making priest Paul Harris and the former Jesuit Michael Cantwell, who were determined to cause a rift between the secular and regular clergy.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CUSACK, HENRY. His services for the Irish Mission were required in February,1622

D'Arcy, John, 1848-1884, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1245
  • Person
  • 23 September 1848-04 June 1884

Born: 23 September 1848, County Tipperary
Entered: 28 September 1867, Milltown Park, Dublin
Ordained: 1883
Died: 04 June 1884, Cannes, Alpes-Maritime, France

Brother of Ambrose D’Arcy (MIS) RIP 1875, (a scholastic), and six months after another brother William who died a Scholastic 1884.

by 1870 at Amiens France (CAMP) studying
by 1871 at Leuven Belgium (BELG) Studying
by 1873 at Antwerp Institute Belgium (BELG) Regency
by 1882 at Leuven Belgium (BELG) studying

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Brother of William D’Arcy RIP 1884, a scholastic, six months after him. Brother also of Ambrose D’Arcy who Entered at Milltown and then joined MIS, and he died at St Louis MO 1875 also a scholastic.
He was sent to be a Teacher at Tullabeg and a Prefect at Clongowes for Regency.
He studied Rhetoric at Amiens, and then Philosophy and Theology both at Louvain.
He died of rapid consumption at Nice, France.

Eustace, Thomas, 1636-1700, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1261
  • Person
  • 25 November 1638-30 January 1700

Born: 25 November 1638, Craddockstown, County Kildare
Entered: 01 December 1658, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1669, Palermo, Sicily
Final Vows: 02 February 1676
Died: 30 January 1700, Irish College, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

1675-1686 at Fermo College (ROM) teaching Philosophy and Grammar - and 1681 teaching Theology at Macerata College
1693-1700 At Irish College in Rome taught Theology, Philosophy and Humanities : Rector 1695-1698

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1692-1695 Rector at Rome. While there in 1692, he received letters from Fathers Relly and Wesly at Poitiers. He sought and procured for the “meritorious and afflicted Irish Mission” 50,000 reales from Fr Emmanuel de Sylva SJ, Lisbon. In 1693 he received a further letter from Father Relly, which was directed to the Greek College, Rome. On 05 February 1695, he received from Father Ininger of Ingolstadt, 500 scudi, or 1,000 florins for the Irish Mission.
In 1690 he was at Poitiers when his nephew William, a lieutenant Sir Maurice Eustace’s infantry writes to tell him that his brother has been killed at the siege of Limerick, “riding as a volunteer”. He also asks him to get him transferred into Tyrconnell’s Horse, in which regiment he would have less work and more pay.
1697 There is a petition against him by his sister-in-law, Mrs Eustace at Craddockstown.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of William and Jane née Whyte (daughter of Nicholas Whyte at Leixlip)
Had already studied Philosophy at Antwerp before Ent 02 December 1658 Rome
After First Vows he was sent for Regency at Fermo, and then studied Theology at Palermo where he was Ordained c 1669
1669-1671 Sent teaching at Ascoli
1671-1672 Tertianship at Florence
1672-1678 Taught Philosophy and Theology at Fermo, and also spent one year during that time as Penitentiary at Loreto
1679-1681 Sent to Macerata College to teach Philosophy
1681-1683 Sent to Irish College Rome as Prefect of Studies
1683-1684 Sent to Fermo College again to teach Dogmatic Theology
1684-1690 Sent to Ireland and was appointed Superior of the Dublin Residence and school, and was also made a Consultor of the Mission, and was though to be a very suitable candidate for Mission Superior. He remained there until the Williamite conquest, and the Mission Superior Lynch sent him to Rome as Procurator of the Irish Mission. On the way he spent a year at Poitiers to attend to urgent financial business of the Mission in the immediate aftermath of the fall of Dublin.
1691 Arrived in Rome and proved himself a tower of strength of the mission during the darkening years that preceded the penal times acting as procurator of the Irish Mission.
1694 Appointed Rector of Irish College Rome 10 October 1694 and died in office 30 January 1700.

Everard, John, d 1649, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1263
  • Person
  • d 06 December 1649

Entered: Flanders Province (FLAN).
Died: 06 December 1649, Professed House, Antwerp, Belgium (Catalogue of Deceased of the Province of Flanders) - Flanders Province (FLAN)

He is named in the Belgian Catalogue as living at the same Professed House, Antwerp 1641-1642. Probably of the Flanders Province (FLA).

Gellous, Stephen, 1613-1678, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1358
  • Person
  • 01 February 1613-22 July 1678

Born: 01 February 1613, Gellowstown, Dublin
Entered: 17 May 1639, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 04 April 1643, Antwerp, Belgium
Died: 22 July 1678, County Wexford

Son of John and Maud O’Dunn.
Studied Humanities in Dublin under a priest Mr Edmund Doyle, Philosophy in a house of the Society under Fr Henry Cavell. They taught Grammar in Dublin.
Received into Soc in Belgium by Fr Robert Nugent
1644 At Antwerp (Arch Irish College Rome IV)
1647 Came to Mission (1650 CAT)
1649 Catalogue is at Kilkenny
1666 Is near New Ross where he conducts a boarding school with Fr Rice, administers the sacraments and other parochial duties. Was captured three times but set free each time. Now on the mission 23 years
A book in Waterford Library has “Steph Gellous Soc Jesu Resid Waterf”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of John Gellows, a carpenter, and Maud née Dunn (Mechelen Album) Family originally from Gellowstown, Co Meath (now Bellewstown)
Early education was in Dublin under Edmund Doyle, a Priest, and then two years Philosophy under Henry Cavell at the Dublin Residence. He then taught Grammar at Douai until he was admitted to the Society by Robert Nugent, Mission Superior, 07 March 1637, and then sent to Mechelen for his Noviceship in 1639.
Studied three years Moral Theology. Knew Irish, English, Flemish and Latin.
1647 Sent to Irish Mission and had been a Professor of Poetry. Taught in the lower schools for three years and was a Confessor (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI)
1649 Teaching Humanities at Kilkenny (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
1650-1660 He was a Missioner in New Ross, and in spite of all the efforts of the rebel Cromwellian forces, he continued by a constant miracle to escape arrest and say his daily Mass, which he did for twenty years. He went sometimes disguised as a faggot-dealer, a servant, a thatcher, porter, beggar, gardener, miller, carpenter, tailor, milkman, peddlar, dealer in rabbit-skins etc. he was nevertheless arrested four times, but always contrived to escape.
1666 Living near New Ross, where he kept a boarding school with Father Rice, taught Humanities and was a Missioner, Preacher, and occasionally with Father Rice, performing the duties of PP to the satisfaction of the Vicar General. The school took the lead of all the others in the country, but it was broken up in the persecution of 1670.
1673 He then taught about forty scholars near Dublin, and then tried to return to New Ross to unsuccessfully re-open his school there.
He was captured four times, and as often released, including riding a race with Cromwellian soldiers. He worked in the Irish Mission for twenty-three years.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John, a carpenter, and Mouda née O’Dunn
Had studied Humanities for seven years under Edmund Doyle, a secular priest in Dublin, and then studied Philosophy for two years at the Dublin Residence with Henry McCavell (McCaughwell) as his teacher. With these studies, he then started teaching Grammar in Dublin, until he was received for the Society by Robert Nugent.
1641 After his First Vows he studied Theology at Antwerp, and with special dispensation from Fr General before he had begun his fifth year in the Society, he was Ordained there 04 April 1643. This dispensation was granted thanks to the Flemish Provincial’s report on Stephen's mature virtue.
1643-1644 Theology was not his forte and so he was sent immediately to Lierre for Tertianship
1644 Sent to Ireland and was to teaching at Kilkenny. Mercure Verdier in his Report of 24 June 1649 for the General on on the Irish Mission described Gellous as “an excellent religious man, who takes no part in worldly business”.
After the Cromwellian conquest he left Kilkenny to exercise his mission in Co Wexford. He became something of a legend for resourcefulness during the “commonwealth” regime. he was captured four times but managed to get free. On one occasion, a protestant judge, disgusted by the perjury of Gellous’ betrayer let him go free. On another occasion he was deported to France, but due to a storm the Captain had to return to port, and once there let Gellous go free. On yet another occasion, he was out on a mission when he rode straight into a troop of Cromwell’s, and he challenged them to a horse race. They accepted, and at the end of the race let him go.
His HQ during these years was New Ross, and it was there, probably at the Restoration, that he opened a famous school, and with Stephen Rice conducted it with great success. Protestants, no less than Catholics were anxious to have their sons educated at this school whom was seen as a genius teacher. One feature of this school was the production of plays he had seen acted in Belgium.
1670 He was visited by the Protestant bishop and told to close the school and leave New Ross. The decision angered Catholic and Protestant locals alike. He staged his farewell by putting on for free, four plays acted by his pupils for the town, and then withdrew to Dublin.
1671-1673 Outside Dublin he conducted a small school by himself for two years
1673 Back in New Ross by popular acclaim and was there until 1678 - the year of his death
Most probably notifications of his death to the General would have gone astray due to the confusion caused during the Titus Oates's Plot.
By the Society’s standards, Stephen was not a clever man in book-learning, but his judgement on weighty matters affecting the Irish Mission was both sought for and respected by the General.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Stephen Gelouse SJ 1614-1675
In Ireland exact date and circumstances unknown died Fr Stephen Gelouse, a man of versatile talents and great zeal. He was born in Meath in 1614, was admitted to the Society in 1639 by Fr Robert Nugent in Dublin, did his noviceship in Mechelen and two and a half years of Philosophy under Fr Henry Cavell in the Dublin Residence.

He will always be remembered for his long and arduous ministry in New Ross, where for nineteen years he laboured as a priest and teacher. His school was famous. Fr Stephen Rice, the Superior writes this to the General : “Stephen Gelouse SJ has been working in and near New Ross this year 1669, and ever since 1650. When the plague and Cromwell’s tyranny ceased, Fr Gelouse taught a small school in a wretched hovel, beside a deep ditch, and there taught a few children privately. When the king was restored, his companion thought they might make a venture, the hut was levelled and a large house built, where they opened a school. It became famous and drew scholars from various parts of Ireland. There were 120 boys, of whom 35 (18 Catholics and 17 Protestants) were boarders. The Jesuits were forced to take the Protestants by their parents. The school flourished for 6 years. Fr Stephen produced a play which was enacted in the main square in new Ross. The play lasted three hours and was witnessed by a very large throng of Protestants and Catholics, many of whom came from distant towns to witness the novel spectacle. For the first time in Ireland, scenery was used on the stage. After the play there was a distribution of prizes”.

When the school was forced to close in 1670, in spite of Protestant parents who fought the authorities for its continued existence Fr Gelouse went to Dublin, where he taught a school of 40 pupils. In spite of persecution, he never missed a day saying Mass for 20 years. He was arrested 4 times, but managed to escape. He used adopt many forms of disguise : a dealer in faggots; a servant; a thatcher; a porter; a beggar; a gardener; a miller; a tailor; a milkman; a peddler, a carpenter and seller of rabbit skins. It was no wonder that he was so expert at training the youth to act.

In 1673 he tried to reopen the school at New Ross, but Protestant fanaticism defeated him. He was still alive in 1675.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
GELOSSE, STEPHEN, born in 1617, was teaching Poetry in Kilkenny College in 1649, and was then reported by the visitor Pere Verdier, as a truly good and religious man. I believe he made his debut as a Missioner at Waterford, whence he was sent to Ross to attend F. Gregory Dowdall in his last illness, and who died in his arms, on the 9th of August, 1659. For the next 19 years he continued to exercise his pastoral functions in that town and neighbourhood. No dangers that threatened him from the Cromwellian party who filled every place with blood and terror, could deter this genuine hero from doing his duty : no weather, no pestilential fevers, no difficulties could hold him back from visiting the sick and the dying in their meanest hovels!. His purse, his time, his services, were always at the command of the distressed Catholic : it was his food and delight to exercise the works of mercy corporal and spiritual. Though the tyrant Cromwell had issued a proclamation to his troops, (and they were in the habit of searching the houses of respectable Catholics), that should they apprehend a Priest in any house, the owner of such house should be hung up before his own door, and all his property be confiscated; and that the captors of the Priest should be rewarded at the rate the Wolf destroyers formerly received (so little value was attached to a Priest s life); nevertheless F. Gelosse managed every day to offer up the unbloody sacrifice of the altar : his extraordinary escapes from the clutches of his pursuers border on the miraculous. He adopted every kind of disguise; he assumed every shape and character ; he personated a dealer of fagots, a servant, a thatcher, a porter, a beggar, a gardener, a miller, a carpenter, a tailor with his sleeve stuck with needles, a milkman, a pedlar, a seller of rabbit skins, &c. thus becoming all to all, in order to gain all to Christ. However, he was four times apprehended, as he told F. Stephen Rice; but his presence of mind never forsook him and he ingeniously contrived to extricate himself without much difficulty. After the restoration of Charles II. he set up a school at Ross, which took precedence of all others in the country, whether rank, numbers, proficiency, discipline, or piety, be taken into consideration, but this was broken up by the persecution in 1670. He then removed to the vicinity of Dublin, where he taught about forty scholars; and in August, 1673, he returned to Ross to reopen his school, but at the end of three months was obliged by the fanatical spirit abroad to abandon this favourite pursuit. He was still living in the summer of 1675, when I regret to part company with him.

Geraldine, Michael, 1588-1621, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1517
  • Person
  • 29 September 1588-30 August 1621

Born: 29 September 1588, Dublin
Entered: 20 September 1607, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 15 March 1614, Brussels, Belgium
Died: 30 August 1621, Antwerp, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)

Alias Fitzgerald

Son of Richard Geraldine and Margaret Cusack
Studied Humanities in Ireland and Antwerp before Ent
Educated at Irish College Douai
1611 Strong, clever, industrious, and a good classical scholar. Pleasing in conversation. Will possess some judgement when he develops, can show impatience.
1613 At Louvain studying Theology

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica”
Son of Richard Geraldine and Margaret née Cusack
Early education in Ireland, then three years Philosophy at Antwerp.
Admitted to the Society by the FLAN Provincial Father Florentine before Ent at Tournai.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ
Son of Richard and Margaret née Cusack
Had studied at Irish College Douai before Ent 20 September 1607 Tournai
After First Vows he completed his studies and Douai and Louvain and was Ordained at Brussels 15 March 1614
After Ordination he taught Philosophy and later Scripture at Antwerp until his death there 30 August 1621

Gough, Ignatius, 1624-1693, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1378
  • Person
  • 1624-18 February 1693

Born: 1624, Sutton, Dublin
Entered: 05 October 1643, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 25 March 1651, Louvain, Belgium
Professed: 04 October 1654
Died: 18 February 1693, Dublin Residence

Alias Goagh

His father Patrick was Mayor of Dublin and his mother was Anne Piers. Father was landowner at Sutton, mother was from Iristernagh. His brother forfeited the estate. A stone at Sutton has family arms of Gough with inscription G & P. Anne Piers’ brother was a priest and uncle Thomas a Franciscan. William Piers - great grandfather of Fr Gough - sent Shane O’Neill’s head to Dublin!
Studied Humanities in Ireland and then 4 years at Antwerp under Jesuits
1646 At Mechelen College
1649 Not in Catalogue
1666 Catalogue On the Mission in Dublin having returned from Holland where he was a missioner for 9 years

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Patrick (Mayor of Dublin) and Anna née Piere or Piece. A Cousin of John Ussher, whose brother tried to deny Ignatius of his inheritance (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
Early education in Humanities was in Ireland, and then at Antwerp under the Jesuits. He was admitted to the Society by FLA Provincial Andrew Judocus and sent to Mechelen for his Noviceship. (Mechelen Album)
1666 He had recently arrived in Ireland from Holland, and he lived in Dublin engaged in many of the Mission’s affairs.
He spent fifteen years in Holland and twenty years in Ireland (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Secomd son of Patrick (Mayor of Dublin) and Anne née Piers
Educated at Antwerp before Ent 05 October 1643 Mechelen
After First Vows, studied at Louvain where he was Ordained 25 March 1651
1654 He was a Military Chaplain at Brussels, then he taught Humanities for a year at Oudenaarde, Belgium, and then made his Tertianship
1657-1665 Missionary work in Holland
1665 Sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence, where he spent the rest of his life as a Catechist, Teacher and Operarius until his death there 18 February 1693
He was heir to a considerable inheritance which provided a foundation for the Dublin Residence and enabled the Fathers of the Mission in Ireland to support themselves. But the Gough estate was confiscated on the fall of Dublin to the Williamites

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
GOAGH, IGNATIUS. This Father, as I find by the letter of his Superior, F. Patrick Lynch, dated Dublin, the 19th of March, 1693, had died on the 18th of February, aet. 68, Soc. 48. He had spent about 15 years in the Mission of Holland, and 25 years in the same capacity in his native country.

Gould, Anthony, 1685-1730, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2327
  • Person
  • 16 October 1685-16 August 1730

Born: 16 October 1685, Ostend, Belgium
Entered: 08 September 1704, Mechelen, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)
Died: 16 August 1730, Halle, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries Goold

Son of William and Agnes née Bauwen. William was of an ancient Cork lineage, and possibly was the William Goold named in the inscription upon a white marble slab in the Virgin Chapel of St Giles’ Church, Bruges). William Goold, Mayor of Cork, died in 1634; Ignatius Goold of Cork, was attainted in 1691.

Studied in various places for seven years ending with a year under the Jesuits at Douai before Ent
Made First Vows at Antwerp.
Defended his Theological Theses on the Incarnation at Louvain, which were printed at Louvain (de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ” art Feytens)

Probably Ent FLAN, as no record in ANG CAT

◆ In Old/15 (1) and Old/16

Harrison, Henry, 1652-1701, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 1652-01 January 1701

Born: 1652, Antwerp, Belgium
Entered: 07 September 1673, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 1682
Final Vows: 02 February 1691
Died: 01 January 1701, Maryland, USA or at Sea - Angliae Province (ANG)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1684 In MAR CAT mentions him with Thomas Hervey, in the New York Mission.
1690 MAR CAT records him as in Ireland
1695 Left Rome for Loreto to take the place of Philip Wright there as English Penitentiary 28/04/1695
1697 Reappears in MAR CAT, but seems to have been sent again on some commission, as CAT 1700 says that “he was on his way, but nothing had then been heard of him”.
1701 MAR CAT records his death, without mentioning day or place.

◆ CATSJ A-H has Has been a missioner in Watten, America, England and Ireland

◆ In Chronological Catalogue Sheet

https://jesuitonlinelibrary.bc.edu/?a=d&d=wlet19530501-01.2.4&e=-------en-20--1--txt-txIN-------

◆ The English Jesuits 1650-1829 Geoffrey Holt SJ : Catholic Record Society 1984
RIP c 1701, place not recorded - perhaps lost at sea before that date.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
HARRISON, HENRY. All that I can collect of him is, that he died in 1701, set 49. Soc. 28.

Haywood, Francis, 1630-1706, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/1425
  • Person
  • 1630-15 March 1706

Born: 1630, County Meath
Entered: 30 July 1651 Liège, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Final Vows: 02 February 1663
Died: 15 March 1706, Ghent, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)

Studied Humanities
1678 at Liège - informarian and in charge of the medicines (had knowledge of medecines)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
He was an educated man and had studied Humanities before Ent.
1694 Socius to Procurator at Antwerp.
1701 & 1704 Infirmarian

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
HAYWOOD, FRANCIS, died at Ghent, 15th of March 1706. In vain do I search for further particulars about him.

Kearney, Barnaby, 1567-1640, Jesuit priest and writer

  • IE IJA J/1497
  • Person
  • 29 September 1567-19 August 1640

Born: 29 September 1567, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 17 October 1589, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 14 February 1598, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 02 August 1605
Died: 19 August 1640, Cashel, County Tipperary

Alias Bryan O'Carney

Son of Pat Kearney and Elizabeth Connor
Master of Arts and studied Philosophy for 6 years - studying at Douai (1588) - D Phil (1589)
1593 at Antwerp teaching Humanities and Poetry
1597 2 years Theology at Louvain
Taught Rhetoric at Lille for 2 years
1599 At Bourges teaching Greek?
1617 In Ireland
1621 Superior of Jesuits in East Munster.
“chiolericus, has judgements and prudence and a good preacher”.
Nephew was Walter Wale

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronolgica” :
Son of Patrick O’Carney and Elizabeth née Coney. Brother of the Archbishop. Uncle of Walter Wale.
Ent 17 October 1589 Tournai; RIP 20 August 1640 Cashel
Studied in Ireland and then four years Philosophy, graduating MA and D Phil at Douai
Admitted by FLA Provincial Oliver Manraeus 17 October 1589, and Noviceship at Tournai
1591 October 2 Sent to St Omer for studies in Humanities
Regency teaching Greek and Rhetoric at Antwerp and Lille;
1603 Arrived with nephew Walter Wale in Ireland
Both he and his nephew were tried and condemned to death
Writer; a fervid Preacher; gave Missions throughout Ireland
He went in disguise for many years and had many hairbreadth escapes (Foley’s Collectanea)
He is also mentioned in the Report of the Irish Mission SJ made to Fr General Nickell (1641-1650) which are preserved in the English College Rome, and a copy at RHC London.
(cf Hibernia Ignatiana" for letters of Fr Kearney recounting his work in Ireland; Oliver’s “Collectanea”, from Stonyhurst MSS; de Backer’s “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ” for published sermons)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Patrick and Elizabeth née Convey
Studied in Ireland and under the Jesuits at Douai and graduated MA before, and Later DD Ent 05 October 1589 Tournai
1591-1595 After First Vows he taught Humanities successively at St. Omer, Antwerp and Lille.
1595-1598 He then studied Theology at Louvain and was Ordained there in 1598.
1698-1601 He had requested to be allowed go to the Irish Mission, and while waiting for permission taught at Bruges and Douai
1601-1602 Made Tertianship at Tournai
1603 Late Spring accompanied by his nephew Walter Wale (both sent an account of their journey to the General once arrived) he set out for Ireland where he was sent to Cashel and Kilkenny but his last years were passed in Cashel, where he died 20/08/1640. In the early days of his ministry he was seen in many parts of Munster and also was able with his nephew Walter to reconcile the Earl of Ormonde with the Catholic Church. He died at Cashel 20 August 1640.
He was for many years a Consultor of the Mission.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Kearney, Barnabas (Ó Cearnaigh, Brian)
by David Murphy

Kearney, Barnabas (Ó Cearnaigh, Brian) (1567–1640), Jesuit priest and writer, was born 29 September 1567 at Cashel, Co. Tipperary, son of Patrick Kearney and Elizabeth Kearney (née Convey). His elder brother was David Kearney (qv), a secular priest who served as archbishop of Cashel (1603–24). Educated locally, Barnabas left Ireland for the Spanish Netherlands and studied philosophy at the Jesuit college in Douai, where he graduated MA (1588), later obtaining a doctorate in philosophy. He entered the Society of Jesus at Tournai on 5 October 1589 and, after his noviciate, taught humanities at Saint-Omer, Antwerp, and Lille (1591–5). Completing his studies at Louvain, he was ordained priest (1596) and then taught at Bruges and Douai. He completed his tertianship at Tournai in 1601–2.

In 1603 he travelled to Ireland with his nephew, Walter Wale, SJ, and for the next thirty years he played a prominent part in the work of the Irish Jesuit mission. Based in Cashel, he enjoyed the assistance of his brother David and, with Walter Wale, worked as one of the pioneers of the counter-reformation in Ireland. Discouraging locals from attending protestant services, in 1605 he avoided being captured by English soldiers when a party of men from the town assisted his escape. A powerful preacher and fluent in Irish, he worked mostly in Munster but also travelled to areas of Leinster, where he worked giving basic religious instruction and also trying to raise the level of the diocesan clergy. In 1610 he was appointed as consultor of the mission and, with Wale, was reputed to have brought Thomas Butler (qv), 10th earl of Ormond, into the catholic faith.

He published collections of his sermons, having manuscripts smuggled abroad to printers on the Continent. His first collection of sermons, Heliotropium, sive conciones tum des festis quam de Dominicis quae in solani totius anni circulo occurrunt, was published in Lyons (1622). In 1623 he sent over a second collection of sermons, ‘Tragici discourses de Passione Domini’, but the Jesuit censors refused to approve it for publication. The manuscript no longer exists and the reason for the censors’ decision remains unclear. Another collection of his sermons was, however, later approved by the censors and published as Heliotropium, sive conciones de mysteris redemptionis humanae quae in Dominica Passione continentur (Paris, 1633). This was dedicated to Archbishop Thomas Walsh (qv), who succeeded Kearney's brother at Cashel. Among the earliest collections of counter-reformation sermons, both of Kearney's publications are now extremely rare, only two copies of his 1622 Heliotropium surviving in Irish libraries (one in TCD, another in the Milltown Institute Library).

In 1629 he was appointed superior of the Cashel ‘residence’ (the territory of the local Jesuit community). His brother had left a small house to the Society and he later supervised the establishment of a small Jesuit community in Cashel. He died 20 August 1640 in Cashel. A collection of his letters is held in the Irish Jesuit Archives, Dublin.

‘Irish ecclesiastical colleges since the reformation: Salamanca, III’, IER, x (Aug. 1874), 527; E. Hogan, SJ, Ibernia Ignatiana (1880); B. Millett, ‘Irish literature in Latin’, NHI, iii, 579; Francis Finnegan, SJ, ‘A biographical dictionary of the Irish Jesuits in the time of the Society's third Irish mission, 1598–1773’, 142–3 (MS volume in Jesuit archives, Dublin); Charles E. O'Neill, SJ, and Joaquín M. Domínguez, SJ (ed.), Diccionario histórico de la Compañía de Jesús: biográfico-temático (Madrid, 2001), iii, 2182; information from Fr Fergus O'Donoghue, SJ, Jesuit archives, Dublin

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Barnaby O’Kearney 1565-1640
One of our greatest Missioners during the Penal Days was Fr Barnaby O’Kearney. Born in Cashel in 1565, where his brother David was afterwards Archbishop, Barnaby entered the novitiate in 1589, and was a brilliant classical scholar, teaching in Antwerp and Lille.

He came back to Ireland with his nephew Walter Wale SJ in 1603, and there he laboured for 37 years. He worked most of hism time in Munster, based in Cashel. On one mission he terrified 5 men who were leading wicked lives, by his description of hell, so that they mended their ways. In another sermon he converted a Viscount and his three brothers. The restitution he caused to be made for sins of injustices in Munster amounted to thousands.

Naturally he incurred the fierce hatred of the priest-hunters. The story of his escape from almost certain capture read like episodes of life in the Wild West. So great was the improvement in public morality as a result of his work, that the judges of the Assizes declared in open court, that Barnaby O’Kearney and Walter Wale did more to prevent robbery than all the enactments and terrors of the law.

It is truly remarkable that this man, in spite of the hazards and perils of his life, lived to celebrate his jubilee in the Society, and also had time in thew midst of his labours to publish his sermons, one volume of Homilies for Sundays and Feasts and another volume on the Passion of the Lord.

He died an old man of 75 years on August 20th 1640.

◆ The English Jesuits 1550-1650 Thomas M McCoog SJ : Catholic Record Society 1994
With his Jesuit companion Walter Wale, Kearney stayed in London with Henry Garnet during the Winter and Spring of 1602/1603 (AASI 46/23/8 pp 399-400

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
KEARNEY, BARNABY, was born at Cashell in 1565, and was brother to David, Archbishop of Cashell. He was admitted into the Society at Douay in the 24th year of his age. After teaching Rhetoric and the Greek Language at Antwerp and Lisle, he was ordered to the Irish Mission, where he arrived with his nephew, F. Walter Wale, in the summer of 1603. Both vied with each other in giving themselves up to the ministry of the Word : and both were marked out for the vengeance of the government. A troop of horse was sent by the Viceroy to Cork to apprehend them at the dawn of the 5th of September, 1606 : but God delivered his servants from their malice. F. Kearney in a letter dated the 4th of October, that year, after mentioning this escape, writes that he followed his Excellency’s footsteps to Waterford, and entered that City unsuspected with the immense concourse of the spectators, and was an ear and eye witness to his triumphant reception. His Excellency on arriving at the Court House, summoned before him eleven of the most respectable inhabitants of Waterford, viz. Paul Sherlock, who had been elected Mayor for the ensuing year, Nicholas Marian, Michael Brown, Nicholas White, James Fagan,* Nicholas Strong, James Sherlock, Richard Wadding, James Walsh, Patrick White, Richard Boucher; six neglected to make their appearance, and were heavily fined, and ordered to present themselves at Cork. The five who attended, with great spirit professed that they would never swerve an iota from the Roman Catholic Religion which they had inherited from their Fathers; but should ever manifest loyal allegiance to their Sovereign, and obedience to his representatives in all civil and political matters. His Excellency marked his indignation at this bold expression of sentiment imposed a heavy fine, and gave them in charge to his Secretary, until they should alter their opinions. Finding them immovably firm in their faith, he caused them to appear before the Lord Chief Justice, who endeavoured to gain them over by promises of place and emolument, and assured them that the Government would be satisfied, if they would but once attend the Protestant service. But these heroes well knowing that dissimulation in Religion was inadmissible, refused their consent, telling him, that they had given, and ever would give undeniable proofs of their civil allegiance; that it could never benefit the king’s interests for them to act against the dictates of conscience; and that they could not believe that the King wished them to make such a sacrifice of principle. The Sheriffs JAMES WAISH and JAMES BREWER “vere duae olivae in Domo Dei”, were then attacked; but with no better success. One hundred and sixty citizens were then selected as likely persons to be prevailed on to surrender conscience to the motives of fear and interest; but God who chooses the weak things of the world to confound the strong, supplied them with courage to resist every assault, and not one, God be praised, of the whole number, nor even in the whole population of Waterford, comprising many thousands of inhabitants, would degrade himself by an act of hypocrisy and apostasy. In revenge, tyrannical iniquity, calling itself justice, and the gospel of the Redeemer, inflicted pecuniary penalties. The base attempt of the Chief Justice to rob the inhabitants of Ross of their conscientious integrity proved equally abortive. “The Viceroy in his progress towards Carrick was informed that Nicholas Madan harboured in his castle of Whitfeld, three miles from Waterford, a learned English Priest, Thomas Hill, an Alumnus of the English College at Rome. Under some specious pretext, his Excellency proceeded in that direction with a troop of horse, and sent a detachment to search every corner of the Castle; but they found nothing, and Mr. Hill, thanks be to God, is still safe in Ireland”. The letter is dated from his hiding place, where his brother, the Archbishop of Cashell lay also concealed “e nostro latibulo, ubi frater modo est”, 4 Octobri, 1606.
F. Kearney continued during the long period of 37 years and in very difficult times the diligent and faithful Steward of the mysteries of God. The friend of peace, the promoter of habits of honest industry and sobriety, this true patriot, deserved to hear that his efforts to advance the public good, and prevent the disturbance of the public tranquillity, were duly appreciated by the constituted authorities. Even judges of assizes were known to declare in open court, that the two Jesuits, Barnaby Kearney and Walter Wale, did more to prevent robbery, than all the terrors of the law, than all the framers of coercive restrictions. I find by a letter of F. Robert Nugent, dated (ex Hybernia 1 Octobris, 1640) the following account of his death :
“F. Barnaby Kearney, an old man of 75 well spent years, quitted on the 20th day of August the labors of this life, as we hope, for everlasting rest, fortified with all the Sacraments of the Church. He had spent 51 years in the Society, and 37 in the Mission, was professed of the Four Vows, and was always zealous in preaching, (some of his sermons are in print) : in various places he taught the people with Evangelic fervour and abundant fruit!”
The sermons alluded to in this paragraph are in Latin for the Sundays and feasts in the whole year. The Title of the book is “Heliotropion”, in 8vo. printed at Lyons in 1622. A second volume of his sermons, on the Passion of Christ, was published in an octavo form at Paris, in 1633. He left in MS. an account of the death of the Earl of Ormond. This nobleman, I take it, was Thomas Butler, called “The Black Earl”, in whose conversion before his death, in 1614, F. Kearney was greatly instrumental.

  • The Fagans were generous supporters of religion. F. Fitzsimon, in a letter dated 25th of November, 1599, mentions, “Dominus Thomas Fagan, insignis Benefactor noster”. as entitled to the special prayers and gratitude of the Society.

Kirwan, Dominic, 1632-1710, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1543
  • Person
  • 25 September 1632-19 September 1710

Born: 25 September 1632, County Galway
Entered: 16 October 1652, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 1663, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 11 June 1672
Died: 19 September 1710, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

Parents Edmund and Anastasia Blake
Studied Humanities at Galway for 5 years then sent by parents to study in Belgium - 2 years at Antwerp under the Jesuits
1663 At Limerick on Tertianship
1666 Catalogue At Galway, Catechist, administering Sacraments on the Mission a year or longer
1700 At La Flèche College
1705 Went to Ireland
1705-1710 At Irish College Poitiers Operarius and teaching Grammar (1708 in Ireland again)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Edmund Kieran and Anastasia née Blake
Early Education at Galway and Humanities at Antwerp
1633 A Tertian at Limerick in December
1644 Came from Belgium to Ireland in July (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
1666 Living in Galway and had been a Missioner there for up to a year (HIB CAT BREV - ARSI)
1699 and 1708 At Poitiers in exile, and had been invited to La Flèche, where he probably died before April 1674
Described as “a distinguished Missioner” (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Edmund (benefactor of the Society) and Anastatia née Burke
After First Vows he was sent to Antwerp for Philosophy and spent Regency successively at Oudenaarde and Ypres.
1659-1663 He was then sent to Louvain for Theology and was Ordained there in 1663
1663-1664 Tertianship at Lierre (Lier)
1664 Sent to Ireland and to Galway as an Operarius and Catechist. He remained there until the Williamite war when he moved to the Dublin Residence.
1698-1706 He was deported and found refuge at La Flèche College as a Missioner
1706 Sent to Irish College Poitiers where he died 19 September 1710

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
KIERAN, or KIRWAN, DOMINICK, was making his third year of Probation at Limerick in Dec. 1633, and was recommended as successor to F. Maurice Ward, who had died at Galway on the 2nd of the preceding month. After the Revolution he retired to Poitiers, and was courteously invited by the French Fathers to sojourn at La Fleche, where, I think he ended his days. This venerable man certainly died before April of the year 1714, as I find by F. Anthony Knoles letter of that date, who stiles him “praestans operarius”.

Leahy, Thomas, 1846-1908, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1564
  • Person
  • 25 August 1846-11 February 1908

Born: 25 August 1846, Ballinasloe, County Galway
Entered: 05 August 1865, Milltown Park, Dublin
Ordained: 1880, Leuven, Belgium
Professed: 02 February 1886
Died: 11 February 1908, St Patrick’s, Melbourne, Australia

by 1868 at Amiens France (CAMP) studying
by 1870 at Leuven Belgium (BELG) studying
by 1871 at Antwerp Institute Belgium (BELG) Regency
by 1879 at Laval France (FRA) studying
by 1885 at Roehampton London (ANG) making Tertianship
Came to Australia in 1887

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Early education at College of Immaculate Conception, Summerhill, Athlone. Here he had as fellow students, Michael Watson SJ, Sir Anthony MacDonnell who became Under-Secretary for Ireland and Mr TP O’Connor, later editor of “MAP” and other Journals.

After First Vows he studied Rhetoric at Amiens, Philosophy at Louvain, Theology at Louvain and he was Ordained there in 1880.
He was a Teacher at various Colleges, Tullabeg, Galway and Belvedere, and later Minister at Crescent.
1880 After Ordination he was sent to Australia.
1890 Appointed Rector of St Patrick’s Melbourne. After his time as Rector he continued on teaching at St Patrick’s, acted as Minister for a time, and remained there until his death 11 February 1908 aged 62.
He was thought gentle and courteous to all, and sometimes called “Silken Thomas”. His death was reported as most edifying.

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
Thomas Leahy studied at Athlone before entering the Society at Milltown Park, 5 August 1865 . He studied philosophy at Louvain, 1869-70, and theology at Laval, France, 1879-80. He taught mathematics and natural philosophy at the Crescent, Limerick, 1874-76, and French, mathematics and physics at Belvedere College, Dublin, 1880-83. Before tertianship at Roehampton, England, 1884, he was minister at University College, Dublin. Then he was appointed to teach at the Crescent and in Galway, 1885-87, before leaving for Australia in 1887. His first appointment was to prepare students in Classics, French and English for the public examination at Riverview. He became prefect of studies at St Aloysius' College, Bourke Street, 1889-90, and continued his teaching for the public examinations. His first administrative appointment was as rector of St Patrick's College, 1890-97, when he was also procurator and prefect of studies, as well as a teacher. Afterwards he taught in succession at St Aloysius' College, 1897-98, Xavier College as minister, 1898-1901, and St Patrick’s College as minister 1901-08. He was a very gentle, kind man, whom everybody seemed to like, and he did a great deal of good work, but without any fanfare. At Riverview he was considered a fine teacher of classics.

Lombard, John, 1583-1642, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1589
  • Person
  • 1583-08 May 1642

Born: 1583, County Waterford
Entered: 21 January 1605, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1609/10
Professed: 15 September 1622, Waterford Residence
Died: 08 May 1642

Had studied 2.5 years Philosophy
1617 In Ireland
1621 Catalogue Waterford, Age 40 Soc 17, on the Mission 8. Studied Theology 4 years and taught controversies at Ypres and Antwerp. Strong, talented, good judgement and prudence. Might be a Superior.
1622 Catalogue In East Munster and 1626 CAT in Ireland
1636 ROM Catalogue In Ireland, good in all and fit to teach Philosophy and Theology

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Professor of Theology at Ypres and Antwerp.
1631 Rector at Waterford
Thirty years on the Irish Mission, and esteemed a good Preacher.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of James and Anastasia née Neal. Nephew of Peter Lombard, Archbishop of Armagh.
Had studied at Irish College Salamanca from 25 March 1602 before Ent 21 January 1605 Rome
1607-1610 After First Vows he resumed studies and was ordained 1609/10. The General had suggested that he should then go to Germany for Theology, but he remained in Italy until 1611.
1611-1613 Fr General designates him for Irish Mission at request of his uncle Peter Lombard, Archbishop of Armagh. He was held at Ypres to teach Controversial Theology for two years. Dr Christopher Cusack made representations to have him kept in Belgium for teaching Irish students but the General decided that mission work in Ireland was more important.
1614 Arrived in Ireland and was sent to Waterford, where founded in Waterford the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, was for many years Superior of the Waterford Residence and he spent the rest of his working life, and died there 08 May 1642

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
LOMBARD, JOHN, nephew to Dr. Peter Lombard, Archbishop of Armagh. The first time that I meet him is in September, 1607. Sometime after he came to the Irish Mission, which he served until his death, about the middle of March, 1642. He is reported by his Superior to have been “eminent for the example of a religious life; and for his laborious industry during the many years he cultivated the vineyard”.

Lynch, Charles, 1818-1906, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1597
  • Person
  • 21 July 1818-09 May 1906

Born: 21 July 1818, Dublin
Entered: 29 September 1837, Ghent, Belgium (BELG)
Ordained: by 1851
Professed: 25 March 1859
Died: 09 May 1906, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly

Younger brother of Henry Lynch - RIP 1874 and Uncle of Edmund Lynch - RIP 1890

by 1847 in Rome studying
by 1855 in Leuven Belgium (BELG) studying Theology
by 1856 at St Beuno’s Wales (ANG) studying Theology 4
by 1879 at Montauban France (TOLO) teaching
by 1881 at St Marys' Canterbury (FRA) teaching
by 1882 at Antwerp Institute Belgium (BELG) Regency
by 1891 at Pau, France (TOLO)

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Younger brother of Henry Lynch - RIP 1874 and Uncle of Edmund Lynch - RIP 1890
Early education was at Tullabeg, where he was brought by John Grene.
He studied Philosophy and Theology in France and was Ordained there.
He taught in various Colleges and was very proficient in French.
He taught English in Belgium for a while.
His older brother Henry was buried in the Old Cemetery at Rahan, and Charles was buried at the new College Cemetery there.

McCarthy, Peter, 1591-1660, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1692
  • Person
  • 1591-28 December 1660

Born: 1591, Belgium
Entered: 22 September 1617, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 03 April 1627, Mechelen, Belgium
Died: 28 December 1660, Roermond, Netherlands - Belgicae Province (BELG)

Son of Charles and Anne Wynter
Place of birth Trefontanensis - Rome? or could be Cerfontaine in Belgium
Fellow Novice of St Jan Berchmans. Studied at Antwerp
1638 “Fr Peter Carthy Superior in altero exercitu”
1642 at Dunkirk
Taught Humanities and Spiritual Father. On Castrensis Mission

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Charles and Anne née Wynter
Fellow Novice of Jan Berchmans
1638 He and William Boyton were on the Dutch Mission; He was Chaplain-in-Chief or Head Camp Missioner;
He was “Trifontanensis” by birth

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Charles (from the noble family de Clancar) an offier in the Spanish Army, and Anna née Wynter (she was Flemish)
He had already studied Humanities at the Jesuit College in Antwerp before Ent 22 September 1617 Mechelen
At Mechelen one of his fellow Novices was Jan Berchmans
After First Vows be was sent for studies in Philosophy to Antwerp and then Louvain. He then did three years Regency at BELG Colleges.
1694 He then returned to Louvain for Theology, and he was Ordained at Mechelen 03 April 1627
After Ordination he was in BELG as Operarius and frequently as a Military Chaplain. His longest periods of service were at Breda and Dunkirk, but he also worked at Ghent, Brussels and Roermond, where he spent the las four years of his life, dying there 28 December 1660
Not regarded as a “foreigner” in Ireland, he was frequently asked for by William Bathe for the Irish Mission. His capacity for languages (he was fluent in eight) meant it was decided he would be more useful remaining in Belgium, particularly because of his special qualities as a Military Chaplain, where his facility in languages meant he could minister to many different races of the Spanish Army based in the Low Countries.

McCaughwell, Henry, 1605-1643, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1695
  • Person
  • 25 December 1605-20 April 1643

Born: 25 December 1605, Co Down
Entered: 04 October 1624, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: c.1630, Douai, France
Died: 20 April 1643, Dublin

Alias Connell

“Henry McCawell or Cavellus, was son of Isabella Carrin or Currin”.
Studied Humanities at Louvain and Philosophy at Douai, teacher of Arts, able to teach Philosophy and Theology

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Name in Latin “Cavellus”
Described as a most learned and zealous man; had been Professor of Philosophy; Imprisoned and flogged.
1642 Deported to France and returned to Ireland March 1643, and he died in Dublin a few days after return of hardship
Directly under “Henry” there are two further McCaughwells: Hugh and John, both apparently born in Down, and both of whom Entered 1624 in Belgium. (These are possible duplicate entries for Henry??)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of William and Isabelle née Carrin
He has previously studied Humanities under the Augustinians at Louvain and the Jesuits at Antwerp and graduated MA at Douai where he studied Philosophy under the Jesuits, before Entry 04 October 1624 at Tournai
1626-1630 After First Vows he was sent to complete his studies at Douai and was Ordained 1630 there
1631 He was sent to Ireland and to the Dublin Residence as Operarius. As an able Philosopher and Theologian, he ran classes in Philosophy and Theology for prospective seminarians, preparing them for Colleges in Europe.
1641 He was in the city when it was taken over by the Puritans 1641. Matthew O’Hartegan (in a letter of 05 August 1642 to the General) described McCavell’s fate “He was arrested, beaten with rods in the market place and put on board a ship bound for France with eighteen other priests. He was ill and half paralysed at the time. He found refuge at La Rochelle, but he was so determined that he was already planning a return to Ireland. He did take a ship the following Spring but died within a few days of his arrival in the city 20 April 1643.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Henry Cavell SJ 1605-1643
In Dublin early in the year 1643 died Fr Henry Cavell, or Caughwell, a man of great learning and zeal for souls.

He taught Philosophy in the Dublin Residence, for we read that Fr Stephen Gellous studied philosophy for two and a half years under him. Though confined to bed, he was dragged by the Parliamentarians from the Dublin Residence in 1642. As he was unable to stand, he was placed in a chair, more for mockery than for ease, and subjected to brutal assaults of the soldiery. He was beaten with cudgels and thrown into the ship with nineteen other religious and priests and transported to La Rochelle, France.

In La Rochelle he was most charitably received by Fr Destraded and given a Brother to assist him. No sooner was he restored to some degree of health then urged by his burning zeal, he hastened back once more to the scene of his labours. On the passage back he encountered a storm which lasted 21 days. He was completely broken down by his sufferings and died in Dublin a few days after landing, a true martyr of charity and zeal.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
CAVELL, HENRY, is described as “Vir doctissimus et animarum zelo plenus”. He was apprehended in Dublin, dragged by soldiers from his sick bed though suffering from Palsy, severely scourged “virgis primum bene caesus” and then put on board a vessel with nineteen Religious and Priests, and landed at Rochelle. The Rector of the Jesuits College there paid him every charitable attention, and by great care and the best medical advice, gradually succeeded in restoring him to a state of convalescence. As soon as he could, the Rev. Father hastened to the scene of his former labors; but within a few days after his return, early in 1613, fell a victim to his zeal and charity. F. G. Dillon says in a letter of the 3rd of August, 1643, that he had encoun tered a storm on his passage back which lasted twenty-one days. “Sic verus Christi Confessor obiit”.

Netterville, Christopher, 1614-1651, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1823
  • Person
  • 14 August 1614-25 August 1651

Born: 14 August 1614, Dowth, County Meath
Entered: 30 September 1632, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: c 1640, Douai, France
Died: 25 August 1651, Galway Residence

Son of Nicholas (Viscount of Dowth and Baron of Belgart) and Elizabeth Bathe

Nephew of Robert Netterville, RIP 1644 and younger brother Nicholas Nettweville, RIP 1697

Studied 5 years Humanities under Jesuits, 3 years in France and then Antwerp. Received into Soc at Tournai at 16 years of age
1633 At Novitiate in Mechelen
1639 At Douai in 3rd year Theology
1642 Came to Mission
1649 In Cork - or in some gentleman’s house
1650 Age 35 teaching Humanities
(Why is his mother Elizabeth and Nicholas’ Helena/)
Interesting reference to his having to hide in his father’s tomb in Sister Cadell’s story of the “Blind Girl”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
6th son of Son of Nicholas Viscount Netterville de Dowth Baron De Ballegart and Eleanor (Hellena) née Bathe, a niece or grandniece of the Earl of Kildare, who had died in the Tower in 1586. Older brother of Nicholas. Nephew of William Bathe on his mother’s side.
Early education in Humanities was under the Jesuits at Galway and similarly at Antwerp. he was admitted to the Society by the FLA Provincial, Fr De Wale, and after First Vows then studied Philosophy for two years and Theology for four, and knew Irish, English, French and Latin.
1642 Sent to Irish Mission and taught Humanities for three years (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI)
In the persecution he had to hide for months in the tomb of his father (like St Athanasius). (Fr Thomas Quin’s Report quoted by Oliver)
He was dear to all for his innocence of life and piety, and had served ten years usefully on the Irish Mission (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
“He had been usefully employed on the Mission for ten years, beloved by all on account of his innocence of life and sweetness of disposition and manners, and remarkable piety. He afforded an excellent example of patience and resignation in bearing a long and painful disease, and met death with a singular joy and delight, fortified by all the Sacraments of the Church, and giving special thanks to God that he died in the holy company of his religious brethern, at a distance from his nearest friends and relatives. (Letter of Robert Nugent, Mission Superior, to the General 27 August 1651 - ARSI; A copy is given in “Excerpta ex. Arch. Rom. Elogia, p 281 - Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Viscount Netterville of Dowth and Helena née Bathe, (sister of Father William Bathe) and brother of Nicholas
He had already studied Humanities with the Jesuits in Galway, and later at Antwerp.
After First Vows he was sent for studies at Louvain and Douai, and was probably Ordained c 1640 at Douai
1641 Sent to Ireland and seems to have operated from his family or relatives home for the next decade, as he is not noted as being a member of any Jesuit House during the Visitation by Mercure Verdier in 1649, who reported that he was in poor health and staying at the house of a nobleman.
It is probable that he spent the last year of his life at the Galway Residence as he was due to make his Final Vows and would be expected to be living in a Jesuit house on such an occasion. He died at the Galway Residence after a long illness 25 August 1651
Some years after his death one of the annual letters recorded that he spent a year living in his ancestors' tomb. This fact is not recorded in his obituary notice forwarded to Rome by Robert Nugent. It is possible that the “annalist” confused his name with that of Christopher Sedgrave, or another of his contemporaries.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Christopher Netterville 1615-1651
In Galway on August 25th 1651 died Fr Christopher Netterville, sixth son of Viscount Netterville of Dowth and his wife Lady Eleanor Bathe, who was a sister of the celebrated Fr William Bathe and a grandniece of the Earl of Kildare, who perished in the Tower in 1586.

Christopher was born in Meath in 1615. He studied Humanities in Galway and Antwerp, entering the Society at Mechelen in 1631. He came on the Irish Mission in 1642.

During the persecution of the Catholics in Cromwell’s time, he was forced, like St Stanislaus, to hide himself for about 18 months in his father’s tomb. Prematurely work out by his sufferings, he died after a long and painful illness in Galway at the early age of 36.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NETTERVILLE,CHRISTOPHER, was the sixth son of Nicholas, the First Viscount Netterville, by his Lady Eleonora, as 1 find p. 199, “Hibernia Dominicana”. During the civil wars and the Cromwellian system of terror, as I learn from F. Thomas Quin’s Report, he was compelled to conceal himself like St. Athanasius for more than a year in his father’s sepulchre, “instar primi Athanasii anno integro et amplius in Sepulchro paterno delituit”. He was still living in the summer of 1619, as a private Chaplain, but with a broken down constitution.

Netterville, Nicholas, 1622-1697, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1824
  • Person
  • 02 February 1622-30 December 1697

Born: 02 February 1622, Dowth, County Meath
Entered: 10 Octpber 1641, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Final Vows: 12 January 1659
Died: 30 December 1697, Dublin Residence

Son of Nicholas (Viscount of Dowth and Baron of Belgart) and Helena Bathe

Nephew of Robert Netterville, RIP 1644 and older brother Christopher Nettweville, RIP 1651

Studied Humanities at Antwerp and Rhetoric at Lille
1645 Not in Catalogue
1649 In 2nd Theology at Bourges - teaching Grammar and Humanities, talent in speculative sciences
1655 At La Flèche College teaching Grammar and Philosophy
1658 Not in Catalogue; At End of Catalogue but not in body along with 5 others (Peter Creagh, William O’Rian, Nicholas Nugent, Stephen Brown and Nicholas Punche) “docent hi”
1661 at La Flèche - a priest, taught Grammar. Good teacher of Philosophy and Theology. Suitable for Missions
1641 At Bruges College teaching Philosophy
1665 before this year went to Ireland with Nicholas Nugent and returned from France to Ireland in 1666
1666 - see Wilsons “Friar Disciplined” p146-7

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
8th son of Son of Nicholas Viscount Netterville de Dowth Baron De Ballegart and Eleanor (Hellena) née Bathe, a niece or grandniece of the Earl of Kildare, who had died in the Tower in 1586. Younger brother of Christopher. Nephew of William Bathe on his mother’s side.
Studied Humanities at Antwerp under the Jesuits, and among his teachers were : Giles Tibant, Ernest Cason and Albert Van Wilstren. He then spent five months Rhetoric under Fr Comblett SJ at Lille. He was admitted to the Society by the FLA Provincial Andrew Judoci 29 September 1641 and then went to Mechelen 10 October 1641 (Mechelen Album Vol iii p 254)
Taught Philosophy and Theology in France for many years
On being sent to Ireland he became Chaplain to the Duke of Tyrconnel, Viceroy of Ireland (Richard Talbot)
1665 Sent to Ireland and was a most agreeable Preacher (HIB CAT 1666 - ARSI). He was a Theologian and “concionator gratissimus”.
1670 Irish Bishops name him fit to govern the Kildare Diocese, and as “doctrina ac verbi Dei praedicatione celebris”,
Archbishop Peter Talbot says of him in his “Haeresis Blackloana” p 19 “The opinion of such a man as Fr Netterville is as of much weight as the other Theologians whom I consulted; for that man has been a great glory of his nation on account of the extraordinary penetration of his genius and the learning with which he lectured very many years in the most celebrated Colleges of all France” Peter Walsh, his enemy, says of him :He had the reputation of a great divine, by title a Doctor, ad by office a Professor of Divinity for some years in France” (Foley’s Collectanea)
1679 He was proscribed by name and deported 02 March 1697 - “He was lodging at the Quay in Dr Cruice’s house” as we learn from the report of a spy, which is preserved in St Patrick’s Library MSS Vol 3.1.18
He was Superior of the Dublin Residence when he died (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Viscount Netterville of Dowth and Helena née Bathe, (sister of Father William Bathe) and brother of Christopher
1643-1646 After First Vows he was sent for studies to Louvain, and Antwerp
1648-1652 He was then sent to Bourges for Theology and graduated DD (Ordained?)
1652-1664 He taught Theology at Rennes, Bourges and Rheims until 1664
1664 Sent to Ireland and Dublin district and later in the City where he became Superior of the Dublin Residence. He was a staunch opponent of Peter Walsh's “Loyal Remonstrance” and Taaffe’s bogus legation from the Holy See. He was arrested and deported during the Titus Oates Plot
1684 He returned to Ireland and at the Dublin Residence until his death 30 December 1697

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Nicholas Netterville SJ 1622-1697
Nicholas Netterville was the 8th son of Viscount Netterville. He had two brothers, Robert and Christopher, also Jesuits.

Nicholas was born at Dowth, County Meath in 1621, and he entered the Society at Mechelen in 1641, and afterwards taught Philosophy and Theology with great distinction.

In October 1678, when he was Rector of the Dublin Residence, he was arrested in connection with the Titus Oates Plot, and banished as a result. He returned in 1686 and became Chaplain to the Duek of Tyrconnell, then Viceroy of Ireland. During the Williamite period, he was prescribed by name and banished again, but the sentence was never carried out and he continued his work in Ireland until 1697.

He gained a great reputation as a preacher, and was looked upon as a profound Theologian. Archbishop Talbot said of him : “The opinion of such a man as Father Netterville is of as much weight as that of all the other Theologians whom I consulted”.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NETTERVILLE, NICHOLAS, younger brother of F. Christopher, (being the eighth son) for many years taught Philosophy in France with distinguished credit. Recalled to the Irish Mission, he was appointed Chaplain to the Duke of Tyrconnell, Viceroy of Ireland. He died in Dublin late in the year 1607, where he had been Superior of his Brethren.

Nugent, Dominic, 1641-1725, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1841
  • Person
  • 04 August 1641-22 June 1725

Born: 04 August 1641, Dysart, County Westmeath
Entered: 14 October 1661, Mainz, Germany - Upper Rhenish Province (RH SUP)
Ordained: 1671, Mainz, Germany
Final Vows: 1681
Died: 22 June 1725, Dysart, County Westmeath - Upper Rhenish Province (RH SUP)

Studied 3 years Philosophy and 3 Theology in Society
1665 At Molsheim RH SUP teaching Humanities
1672 Tertianship at Ettlingen, Baden-Württemberg
1708 Catalogue Preacher
1714 Catalogue Taught Grammar and Music, Spiritual Coadjutor
1717 Catalogue Taught Grammar and served on Mission many years. Humble, a lover of Religious poverty. Of great candour an sincerity. Now worn with labour and old age is now confined to his bed.
In Register of Popish priests of 1704 is Dominic Nugent, PP of Dysart, Ordained at Mainz 1674 by Archbishop Gabriel

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
In a letter dated 25 November 1694 he appears then as a PP working with great zeal and success in a poor and wretched district, and still doing this in 1714. A good Preacher (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
He is mentioned in “A List of Popish Parish Priests as they are registered at the General Sessions of the Peace held for Westmeath at Mullingar 13 July 1704 :
Dominick Nugent; Place of abode - Dysart; Age 64; Parishes of which he pretends to be Popish Parish Priest - Dysart and Churchtown; Places where he received Orders - Mentz, in Germany; From whome he received Orders - Gabriel, Suffragen of the Elector of Mentz; Sureties names that entered into recognizance for such Priest according to the Act of Parliament - Henry Mather, of Bryanstown, Gent £50 and John Nugent, of Ballynude, Gent £50;
He is mentioned in the HIB Catalogues 1708 & 1717 as a Nugent of Dysart. He had taught Grammar and Music in one of our German Colleges, and published a book of songs (music and words) called “Die Nachtigal”, thus showing that he had the hereditary love of the Nugent’s for “Music and Song”, which was possessed also by Nicholas and Robert, and their near kinsmen the Barons of Delvin and Scrine.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had studied in Belgium, as he was accepted for the Society at Antwerp before Ent 14 October 1661 Mainz and claimed to have Flemish
After First Vows he was sent to Mosheim, France for Philosophy and then spent two years Regency at Colleges in RH SUP. He then returned to Mainz for Thelogy and was Ordained there c 1671. He then seems to have made Tertianship, and it is a little unclear what he did next.
1675-1677 Operarius at Luxembourg
1677-1680 Member of the community at Irish College Poitiers
1680 Sent to Ireland and for the next 37 years was active mostly in Meath
1704 He was registered as PP of Dysart ad Churchtown 13 July 1704, with sureties from John Nugent of Ballynude and Henry Mather of Bryanstown. He died at Dysart c 22 June 1725
Dominic Nugent was an accomplished linguist. It is significant of the time in which he lived that in the list of languages he supplied to the compilers of the Catalogues of 1665 and 1669, he mentions Irish before English and after English Scots.
Before he left the Rhenish province he composed and set to music songs in German which were published in 1675 (Somervogel)
His own greatest claim was his devotion to his Priestly ministry in the darkest Penal times.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
NUGENT, DOMINIC. The only notice I find of him is in a letter, dated Waterford, 25th November, 1694. He was doing the duty of a Parish Priest, in a poor and miserable district, and labouring with great zeal and success.

O'Reilly, Myles, 1722-1799, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1948
  • Person
  • 30 September 1722-22 January 1799

Born: 30 September 1722, Ardcath, County Meath
Entered: 21 September 1744, Mechelen, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)
Ordained: 21 August 1756, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 1761
Died: 22 January 1799, Antwerp, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)

Younger brother of Philip O’Reilly - RIP 1775

Son of Patrick and Mary (O’Reilly), brother of Philip
1745 At Mechelen studying Humanities at Antwerp and Mechelen, and Philosophy at Antwerp and Louvain
1746-1749 Teaching French
1750-1754 In Theology at Antwerp
1755-1756 At Louvain studying Theology
1757-1766 Missioner in in Friesland, Netherlands. Traditions of the Island was that he went to Antwerp in 1766.
1771 Was a Missioner in the Province of Frisia (Holland?)
Death : Some say in Ireland 1799, but Van Lommel writes to Fr Hogan that he died that year at Antwerp.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Younger brother of Philip O’Reilly. Uncle of Father Leonard PP of Ardcath Co Meath.
Studied Humanities under the Jesuits at Antwerp for three years before Ent. He then studied at Mechelen, and Theology at Louvain under the famous Porcensus before Entry.
Admitted to the Society by the FLA Provincial Charles Van Abeele at Antwerp, September 1744.
1753-1773 On the Dutch Mission
1793 At Antwerp
(cf Foley’s Collectanea and Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS and an original letter of R O’Callaghan SJ in HIB Archives)
Note from brother Philip’s Entry :
1751 Sent to West Indies, and there went through the severest hardships, which he narrates with much joy in Flemish letters to his brother Miles - these have been edited by Father Morris with a brief sketch of his life.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Patrick and Maria née O’Reilly. Brother of Philip RIP 24 January 1775 Dublin
Had already studied at Pastoral College Louvain
After First Vows he was sent to Antwerp for one year of Philosophy, and then spent six years Regency there before being sent to Louvain for Theology and he was Ordained there 21/08/1756
Until the suppression of the Society in 1773, he worked in Holland and died at Antwerp 1799

O'Reilly, Philip Joseph, 1719-1775, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1950
  • Person
  • 19 November 1719-24 January 1775

Born: 19 November 1719, Ardcath, County Meath
Entered: 26 September 1741, Mechelen, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 01 May 1750, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 02 February 1766
Died: 24 January 1775, Dublin

Older brother of Myles O’Reilly - RIP 1799

Son of Patrick and Mary (O’Reilly); brother of Myles
Studied Humanities at Ghent
1743-1745 In Pholosophy at Antwerp
1745-1746 Teaching at Dunkirk
1746-1750 In Theology at Louvain
1750 At Amazon River Mission, or the Courou Mission S America, or on the Indian Mission since 1751, or 1757 in Paris Province FRA; or in the FLAN-BEL Province since 1751. “Joseph Philip O’Reilly missioned among the savages of Guiana for 14 years. This last survivor and sole representative of the Company of Jesus among the poor savages was expelled by the French in 1765” (Marshall’s Xtian Missions) Many letters he sent to in Flemish his brother Miles are at Burgundian Library. (loose Hogan note)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Patrick and Mary née O’Reilly. Older brother of Miles.
Studied Humanities under the Dominicans at Lierre for two years, and then for four under the Jesuits at Ghent.
1741 Received by the FLAN Provincial at Ghent and sent to Mechelen for his Noviceship.
1743-1745 At Antwerp studying Philosophy
1745-1747 Regency at Dunkirk
1747-1751 Studied Theology at Louvain for four years.
1751 Sent to West Indies, began at the Amazon, and then in the Indies went through the severest hardships, which he narrates with much joy in Flemish letters to his brother Miles - these have been edited by Father Morris with a brief sketch of his life.
1765 Sent to the Maryland Mission
1769 Sent to first to Belgium and then Ireland, dying in Dublin 24/01/1775.
1771 Catalogue Sent to Maryland again?
According to Marshall’s “Missions” Vol iii, p 74, “The French in 1763 expelled from Guiana, the venerable Father O’Reilly, the last survivor and sole representative of the Company of Jesus among the savages - with the result that - in 1766 religion was dying out among the whites as well as among the coloured races”
Carayon in his “Guyane Francaise” says Father O’Reilly was expelled in 1765.
His letters are in the Burgundian Library, Brussels MSS 6689, written in Flemish and dated Cayenne, 27 March and 25 September 1751, 19 June 1753 and 10 September 1754.

◆ Fr John MacErlean SJ :
Made Latin studies in Belgium and then Ent at Mechelen in 1741
1750 Having completed Theology at Louvain he left for the Mission of Cayenne in French Guyana, arriving in 1751
1751 At Courou (Kourou), French Guyana labouring among indigenous tribes for almost a dozen years
1763 At the expulsion of Jesuits from French territories, he was the last Jesuit to leave, and is said to have gone to Spanish Missions along the Orinoco
1765 Arrived at the English Maryland Mission
1769 Returned to Ireland worked in Dublin, where he died in 1775

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Patrick and Maria née O’Reilly. Brother of Myles RIP Antwerp 1799
Early education was in Belgium before Ent 26 September 1741 Mechelen; RIP 24 January 1775 Dublin
1743-1751 After First Vows he was sent to Antwerp and Louvain for studies and was Ordained there 1750.
1751-1763 When his formation was complete he was sent to the French Mission in Cayenne, French Guyana. There he worked with the Indian tribes for twelve years. When Jesuits were expelled from all of France and her territories, he was the last Jesuit to leave. When he left Cayenne, he is said to have gone to the Spanish Missions along the Orinoco, and from there to the ANG Mission in Maryland. The rest of his missionary life up to the Suppression is unclear. It would appear that he returned to Ireland after the Suppression and died in Dublin a year later 24 January 1775.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father Philip O’Reilly 1719-1755
Fr Philip O’Reilly was born at Ardcath County Meath in 1719. He went to Belgium for his education where he joined the Society at Mechelen in 1741.

He left for the Mission of Cayenne in French Guyana in 1750, where he laboured for over a dozen years among the Indians at Kourou. On the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1763, he was the last Jesuit to leave his post.

He went for a short time to the Spanish Missions along the Orinoco and thence in 1765 to the English Mission of Maryland,

In 1769 he returned to Ireland and died in Dublin in 1775.

Plunket, John, 1588-1643, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1988
  • Person
  • 01 October 1588-24 November 1643

Born: 01 October 1588, Dublin
Entered: 15 August 1611, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 14 April 1618, Douai, France
Died: 24 November 1643, Wexford Residence, Wexford

Mother was Margaret Bagnall, clearly brother of Henry
Studied Humanities in Schools of the Society at Antwerp and Tournai, and Philosophy at Douai
1615 At Cambrai studying Philosophy
1617 In Belgium
1619 At Douai teaching Greek
1621 Catalogue A native of Meath Age 33 Soc 10 Mission 1. Health middling. As he only came lately he is hardly known to us.
1622 In Dublin District
1637 ROM Catalogue Talent, judgement and prudence good. Cholericens. Middling proficiency in letters. Fit to teach Humanities.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Professor of Greek at Douai;
1617 In Belgium (Irish Ecclesiastical Record)
1620 Came to Ireland and was in Dublin Diocese 1621 and 1622

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Christopher and Margaret née Bagnall and brother of Henry
Early education with the Jesuits at Antwerp and Douai before Ent 15 August 1611 Tournai
1613-1615 After First Vows he was sent to teach Greek at Tournai for two years
1615-1619 He was then sent to Douai for Theology and Ordained there 14 April 1618
1620/21 Sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence, but worked mostly outside the city.
1627-1641 A brief mission at Waterford, but was back in Dublin when he appears to have been recalled to Dublin as a result of a letter from the General who wished to have the Mission Superior Robert Nugent reprimand him for some indiscretion. He remained in Dublin until c 1641
1641 He was sent to the Wexford Residence where he died at Wexford 24 November 1643

Power, William, 1848-1931, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/755
  • Person
  • 03 January 1848-04 June 1931

Born: 03 January 1848, Ardee, County Louth
Entered: 07 September 1865, Milltown Park, Dublin
Ordained: 1881
Final vows: 02 February 1889
Died: 04 June 1931, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly

Early education at St Stanislaus College SJ, Tullabeg

by 1868 at Amiens, France (CAMP) studying
by 1869 at Leuven, Belgium (BELG) studying
by 1870 at Antwerp, Institute Belgium (BELG) Regency
by 1873 at Laval, France (FRA) studying
by 1879 at Laval, France (FRA) studying
by 1881 at St Aloysius, Jersey Channel Islands (FRA) studying
Came to Australia 1888
by 1916 at St Luigi, Birkirkara, Malta (SIC) teaching

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
William Power began his long life in the Society at Milltown Park in 1865. Soon after tertianship, in 1890, he left Ireland for Australia, teaching at St Aloysius' College, 1891-92, followed by St Patrick's College in 1893, Riverview in 1894 and later that year he was moved to Xavier. He spent much of his later life writing at Tullabeg.

◆ Irish Province News
Irish Province News 6th Year No 4 1931
Obituary :
Fr William Power

Fr. Wm. Power ended his long life of 83 years at Tullabeg on 4 June 1931

He was born on January 3rd 1848, educated at Tullabeg, and, in his 17th year, entered the novitiate at Milltown. After the novitiate he was sent to St. Acheul in France for his juniorate. In those days this seems to have been the ordinary course for our young Irish Jesuits. At the end of the 1st year juniorate he went to Louvain for philosophy, but when the first year came to an end he travelled to Antwerp where he taught for one year. This was succeeded by five years of teaching and prefecting at Clongowes. In 1875 he went to Laval where he finished his philosophy, then another year teaching in Tullabeg, and when it over he returned to Laval for theology. In 1880 he shared the expulsion and exile of his brother Jesuits and finished his theology at Jersey.
Four more years teaching in Irish Colleges elapsed before his tertianship at Tronchiennes, followed by two years teaching in Ireland, and in 1839 he set sail for Australia. He did work in several Australian Colleges until 1895 when we find him once more in Tullabeg. Next four more years in Clongowes, and then Tullabeg. He remained there until 1915 when he travelled as far as Malta, where he taught tor two years. When they were over he went back to Tullabeg and did not leave it until his happy death in 1931. During the last five years of his life he was in very poor health.
Fr. Power was in fair health until 30 May. On that day he felt unwell and remained in bed. On 1 June he received Holy Communion in the early morning, and seemed to be fairly well. About 10 o’clock however, there was a a sudden change tor the worse and he was anointed. The end came four days later, Death was due to cerebral haemorrhage, Members of the Community watched continually by his bedside during the last four days and nights,
From the first days of his theology Fr. Power applied himself earnestly to the study of Holy Scripture. especially the Psalms, and gathered a vast amount of useful and instructive matter on this sacred subject. He was always most willing during his lifetime to help those who applied to him for assistance in solving difficult and obscure passages, but, unfortunately, he has left nothing behind him that would be of use to future students, and at the same time, show the extent of his own careful and wide reaching researches.
During his whole life he was an ardent student of literature, and won for himself in this matter a very high reputation. Some years ago he published a number of his poems in a volume entitled “The Kings Bell”. Since then he wrote a great deal, and it remains for our students to collect the scattered fragments, publish them, and thus perpetuate the memory of a scholar of very correct taste and varied culture.

Quin, Thomas, 1603-1663, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2019
  • Person
  • 02 February 1603-07 August 1663

Born: 02 February 1603, Dublin
Entered: 02 September 1623, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 04 July 1628, Douai, France
Professed 16 May 1641
Died: 07 August 1663, Dublin

Superior of the Mission 1654-1657

Son of Genet Lattin
Studied Humanities at Antwerp, Philosophy at Douai, became an MA
1627 ROM Catalogue Good in all. Colericus. Fit to teach Philosophy and Theology
1649 Catalogue marked at Dublin
1650 Catalogue Age 47. Came to Mission 1631. Superior in Dublin and Waterford Residences some years. Prof of 4 Vows. Taught Humanities, Concinator and Confessor
1652 His report on Ireland is at Arundel - Gradwell’s MS III 567

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied Humanities and two years Philosophy before Ent 1623. Knew Latin, English, French and a little Irish
1629 or 1631 Sent to Ireland
Taught Humanities for a number of years; was a Preacher and Confessor; Superior of a Residence (HIB Catalogue 1650 - ARSI); Writer; Prisoner; Exile.
1642 In Dublin, an indefatigable missioner. He held his ground in Dublin with Fathers Latin and Purcel for years, disguised often as a private gentleman, soldier, peasant, ratcacther, baker, shoemaker, gardener etc to elude the Puritans.
When Superior of the Mission he wrote a brief Report on the condition of Irish Catholics in 1652 and 1656
1651, 1658 In Antwerp
1659 At Nantes (all above dates Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS) He is placed in BELG Catalogues at Professed House Antwerp, as Confessorr 1651-1652, and June 1658 and October 1659
Writes from Douai to Wadding 1639 (Foley’s Collectanea)
Mercure Verdier, Visitor to Irish Mission calls him a wonderful missioner “mirabilis operarius”.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Richard, a merchant, and Jennett née Latin
Had graduated MA at Douai before Entry 02 September 1623 Tournai
1625-1628 After First Vows he was sent for classical studies to Lille and then Theology at Douai, where he was Ordained 04/07/1628
1628-1631 Sent to Ireland and Dublin, where he taught Latin and directed the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin
1632-1633 Sent back to Belgium to complete his studies
1633-1645 Sent to Ireland and Dublin, and when the Puritans took control he managed to stay there undetected
1645-1651 Superior of Dublin Residence (ie., Superior of any Jesuits exercising Ministry in Leinster)
1651-1654 Sent to Antwerp as Procurator of Irish Mission
1654 Returned to Ireland to substitute for the Mission Superior who had been arrested 01 October 1654. He managed to remain undetected for two years, and during this time wrote two accounts on the state of the Irish Mission and Catholic Ireland
1656 About November he was captured and was to be confined to Inishbofin, but at the end of 1657 he was released on bail and then deported to the Continent
1658 He arrived in Paris in 03 January 1658, and once more became Procurator for the Irish Mission. On 17/8/1658 he was asked by the General to establish in Brittany a house of refuge for the fathers of the Irish Mission, and two months later secured a house at Solidor, a suburb of St Malo in October 1659. They opened a school for the children of Irish merchants, and this was later moved to Dinant. The attempt to found an Irish Jesuit house in Brittany was frustrated by opposition from the local French Jesuits and Quin and his companions were summoned back to Ireland in 1662. On his return he offered strong opposition to Peter Walsh’s “Remonstrance”.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Thomas Quin (1654-1657)
Thomas Quin, son of Richard Quin, a Dublin merchant, and Jennett Latin, was born at Dublin, on or about 2nd February, 1603. He went to Flanders in 1619; studied rhetoric at Antwerp and Douay and philosophy at Douay, where he obtained his degree of Master of Arts. He joined the Society at Tournay on 2nd September, 1623. After his noviceship his scholastic career is rather interrupted. He repeated his classical studies at Lille, and studied theology at Douay for two years, and was ordained priest on 4th July, 1628. He returned then to Ireland for a couple of years, during which time he taught Latin and directed the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin at Dublin. He went back to Belgium in 1631 to finish his theological studies, but after one year had to return to Ireland, where he completed then a few years later. He was stationed usually at Dublin, where he made his solemn profession of four vows on 16th May, 1641. He was one of the two or three Jesuits that succeeded in remaining in Dublin undetected during the Puritan regime. From 1645 to 1651 he was Superior of the Dublin Residence. Fr Maurice Verdier, the Visitor, in his report of 1649, says Fr Quin was one of two Fathers in Dublin, and adds: '”I have not seen him, but I hear he is a wonderful missioner”. At the general break-up in 1651 he was sent as Procurator of the Mission to Antwerp, where he remained three years. He was applied for by Fr. Malone, on his arrest, to act as his substitute, and set out on 1st October, 1654, from Belgium. He reached Ireland, and escaped capture for two years, during which he wrote two accounts of the state of the Mission and of the Catholics of Ireland. About the month of November, 1656, he fell into the hands of his enemies, and was to be confined in Inishbofin, but at the end of the year 1657 he was released on bail and banished to the Continent. He landed in France, and was in Paris on 3rd January, 1658.

Thomas Quin (1663)
When Fr Quin was banished at the end of 1657, he went first to Paris, and then soon after to the Professed House at Antwerp. During the Superiorship of Fr Richard Shelton he acted as Procurator of the Irish Mission in Europe. On 17th August, 1658, he was asked by the General to go to Brittany with a view to establishing there a house of refuge for the Fathers of the Irish Mission. He arrived in Nantes at the end of the year, and secured a house at Solidor, a suburb of St. Malo, in October, 1659. Here a school was opened for the children of Irish merchants, which was later transferred to Dinan, five leagues off. The opening of this house aroused much opposition, and Fr Quin and the other Irish Fathers returned to Ireland in October, 1662. On his arrival Fr Quin offered determined opposition to Peter Walsh's Remonstrance, On 10th February, 1663, he was appointed Superior of the Mission. He was in failing health at the time, and died at Dublin on 7th August, 1663.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Thomas Quin 1603-1663
Fr Thomas Quin, whop was twice Superior of the Irish Mission, was born in Dublin round about February 2nd 1603, the son of Richard Quin, a Dublin merchant and Jenett Latin. Having completed his studies on the Continent, he entered the Society at Tournai in 1623.

After his ordination in 1628 he returned to Ireland where he taught Latin and directed the Sodality of Our Lady in Dublin. He was one of the two or three Jesuits that succeeded in remaining in Dublin undetected during the Puritan regime.

From 1645-1651 he was Superior of the Dublin Residence. At the general breakup in 1651 he was sent as Procurator of the Mission to Antwerp, but returned at the request of Fr William Malone in 1654.

For two years he evaded the priest-hunters and managed to write two accounts of the Mission and of the Catholics in Ireland. He was banished to France in 1657, having acted as Superior of the Mission 1654-1657.

In 1658 he was sent by the General to open a house for the Fathers of the Irish Mission in Brittany. He secured a house at Solidor, a suburb of St Malo. Here he opened a school for the children of Irish merchants which was later transferred to Dinan. This aroused opposition, so he and the other Irish Fathers returned to Ireland, where Fr Quin was very outspoken in his opposition to Peter Walsh’s Remonstrance.

On February 10th 1663 he was appointed Superior of the Mission for the second time, but he was in failing health and died on August 7th 1663.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
QUIN, THOMAS. This worthy Jesuit was stationed in Dublin in 1642. In a letter of F. Robert Nugent, dated Manapia, (Waterford) 10th of October, 1642, he speaks highly of his unremitting zeal and charity that he was a source of comfort to the afflicted citizens that he was all to all, that he assumed occasionally the military uniform, now the habit of the gentry, occasionally the dress of a peasant, to elude Puritan vigilance, and to introduce himself into Catholic houses. Pere Verdier, in the course of his visitation nearly seven years later, could not get access to the metropolis, but states the general opinion of F. Quin’s invaluable services as a Missionary. I have seen a brief report of his, written when Superior of the Mission, on the condition of the Irish Catholics in 1652 and 1656. Three years later he was at Nantz, whence he removed to St. Malo. He died 7th August, 1663. See also pp. 677-882 of the Hibernia Dominicana.

Rice, Stephen, 1625-1699, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2047
  • Person
  • 03 April 1625-07 January 1699

Born: 03 April 1625, Dingle, County Kerry
Entered: 20 May 1648, Kilkenny
Ordained: 13 March 1660, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 03/ November 1664
Died: 07 January 1699, Dublin Residence - Romanae Province (ROM)

Alias James Flent
Superior of Mission 08 October 1672

Had studied 2 years Philosophy before Ent. Taught Humanities 16 years. Was Superior of Irish Mission
1666 Is living near New Ross teaching school at his Boarding School. Preaches Catechetics in the country and does parochial work. Very good. On Mission 5 years. Has good talents with great fitness for catechising and teaching boys.
1679-1682 Minister and Prefect of Boarders at Irish College Poitiers
There is at Clongowes a “Praxis Episcopalis” Ed 1618 in which is written “P Ig. Rice”

1660 or 1662 Sent to Ireland from Professed House at Antwerp
1662 Living in New Ross where he kept a boarding school, and was engaged in Preaching, Catechising etc, and also occasionally acting as PP
1672 Superior of the Mission, and recommended for the same office in 1697 . Father Kelly, Rector at Poitiers, in a letter to the General, recommends Stephen Rice to be the Superior of the Mission again in a letter dated 26 May 1697 (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
He is the author of a long and most interesting history of the Irish Mission SJ 1669-1675 (cf Foley’s Collectanea)
Highly eulogised in letters of the martyred Archbishop Plunkett to the General Oliva, dated Dublin 22 November 1672 and Armagh 31 January 1673
Much praised for learning, zeal, eloquence, holiness etc, by Primate Plunket and Dr Peter Talbot
Note from No Ch Name (actually George) Murphy :
Named in an Italian letter, dated Dublin 22 November 1672, ad written by the Martyr, the Archbishop Oliver Plunket, Primate of Ireland, to Father General Oliva, in which, after expressing his affectionate regard for the Society, and informing him of the meritorious labours of Fathers Rice and Ignatius Brown at Drogheda, he speaks of Father Murphy as a good Theologian, and excellent religious man, a man of great talent, and a distinguished preacher in the Irish language. (cf Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of James and Phyllis née Fanning (daughter of Edmund of Limerick) and brother of Br Nicholas Rice (LEFT?)
Studied Humanities and Philosophy under the Jesuits at Kilkenny before Ent 20 May 1648 Kilkenny
A year after First Vows he was sent to Flanders for Regency before Theology at Louvain where he was Ordained 13 March 1660
1662 Sent to Ireland and initially to Limerick
1663-1670 Sent to join Stephen Gellous at New Ross, where he taught Humanities and Rhetoric for the next seven years
1670-1672 Went to Drogheda to organise the College there which was opened by Blessed Oliver Plunket.
1672-1678 Superior of the Mission 08/10/1672. A fresh wave of persecution meant that the schools had to be closed and missionary work carried on in secret. During his term of office the Irish College, Poitiers was established, not only as a school for boys, but also a refuge for old, inform or exiled Irish Missioners. Before he finished Office he wrote at length to the General regarding the Irish Mission 1669-1675.
1678-1682 At the time of the Oates's Plot, 1678, he was arrested and then deported. He went to Poitiers and was Minister of the Irish College until 1682
1682 Sent back to Ireland and Limerick. After the surrender of Limerick he came to Dublin as Consultor of the Mission, and he died there 07 January 1699, and is buried in St. Catherine’s Churchyard

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Stephen Rice (1672-1675)

Stephen Rice, son of James Rice, of Dinglicoush, and Phyllis, daughter of Edmund Tanning, of Limerick, was born at Dingle on 3rd April, 1625. He made his early studies up to philosophy at the College of Kilkenny, where he entered the Novitiate of the Society on 20th May, 1648. In 1651 he was sent to Flanders, where, after the usual course of teaching and study, he was ordained priest on 13th March, 1660, during his fourth year of theology at Louvain. On his return to Ireland he was stationed first at Limerick (1662), but next year he was sent to New Ross, where he taught school for seven years. He made his solemn profession of four vows at Dublin on 3rd November, 1664. In 1670 he went to Drogheda to conduct the College opened there by the Blessed Oliver Plunket. On 8th October, 1672, he was appointed Superior of the Mission. A fresh outburst of persecution caused the closing of our schools, and the ordinary ministrations of the Society had to be carried on in secret. During Fr Rice's term of office the Irish College of Poitiers was founded as a house of refuge for old, infirm, or exiled missioners. Before leaving office he wrote a long report on the work of the Society in Ireland from 1669 to 1675. At the time of Oates's pretended Plot (1678) he was arrested and banished. He went to Poitiers, and acted as Minister of the Irish College till 1682, when he returned to Limerick. After the surrender of Limerick he came to Dublin, as Consultor of the Mission, and died there on 7th January, 1699.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Stephen Rice SJ 1625-1699
Stephen Rice was born in Dingle in 625. Educated at our school in Kilkenny, he entered the noviceship there in 1648. Ordained at Louvain in 1660, the year of the Restoration of Charles II, he was stationed first at Limerick, then at New Ross, in which town he taught school for seven years.

At the request of Blessed Oliver Plunkett he opened a school in Drogheda, where he had 150 pupils, besides 40 Protestant gentlemen who attended classes in 1670.

Two years later he was made Superior of the Mission. During the disturbance caused by the Titus Oates Plot, he went to Poitiers, where he acted as Minister.

However, in 1682 he managed to return to Ireland and he worked in Limerick. After the surrender of that city to the Williamites he came to Dublin as Consultor of the Mission, and he died there in January 7th, 1699.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
RICE, STEPHEN, began his Noviceship at Kilkenny, and in the sequel became a leading man amongst his Brethren. The venerable Primate Archbishop Plunkett, of glorious memory,* in a letter addressed from Dublin on the 22nd of November, 1672, to the General S. J. Father John P. Oliva, extols Father Rice then Superior of his brethren, for his learning, disinterested and indefatigable zeal, fervid eloquence, remarkable discretion, and profound religious virtue; he adds, that this good Father has all the modest diffidence of a Novice: that he is a true son of St. Ignatius, and full of the spirit of the Institute. In a second letter to the same, dated Armagh, 30th of January, 1673, the worthy Archbishop repeats his unqualified commendation of this meritorious Father. His Grace of Dublin, Archbishop P. Talbot, held him in no less esteem. We have this Rev. Superior’s well written report of the Irish Mission of the Society, from the year 1669 to the 15th of July, 1675, and which has furnished several details for these biographical Sketches. I find by a letter dated Poitiers, 20th of May, 1097, that he was thus recommended by its Rector, F. Kelly, to the General Gonzales, to resume the Government of his Brethren in Ireland : “Rev. Father Stephen Rice, who, about 20 years since, was Superior of the Mission, appears to me eminently qualified to fill that office again, unless his age and strength may incapacitate him for the labour”. When the good old man descended into the tomb, I have inquired in vain.

  • The head of this illustrious victim of legal murder, is respectfully preserved in the Convent at Drogheda. How true is the remark, that “Calumny spread, no matter how, will frequently prove an Overmatch for candour, truth, and innocence, until time has applied his Touchstone, and proved the temper of the Metal!”

Sarrazina, George, d 1689, Jesuit brother

  • IE IJA J/2089
  • Person
  • d 19th July 1689

Entered: 1644 - Flanders Province (FLAN)
Died: 19th July 1689, Mechelen, Belgium - Flanders province (FLAN)

1649 marked at Kilkenny

Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1647 He had charge of the printing press at Kilkenny
1657 He had charge of the printing press at Évora, Portugal
He is perhaps the “Brother George” praised by Primate Plunket in 1672

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
A member of the Flanders Province was loaned to the Irish Mission in 1646 in order to work the printing press at the Jesuit College, Kilkenny. When the press was eventually seized by the Supreme Council, he remained on for some time at the College and was Dispenser there. Mercure Verdier during his Visitation of the Mission in 1649 met George and in his report to Rome paid tribute to his fine qualities of character. George returned to Flanders after the Visitation.
1657-1661 He was once more “on loan” having been sent to help with the printing press at the College of Évora in the Portuguese Province
1661 For some years he was stationed at Antwerp and then was sent to Mechelen where he died 19 September 1689
Although he was a member of the BEL FL Province, he is rightly reckoned amongst those who served in the Irish Mission.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Brother George Sarazen SJ ????-1689
George Sarazin was a printer and manager of the printing press in Kilkenny. He entered the Society and there operated the printing press the Society had acquired in Kilkenny, perhaps from Brother George. All the printing of the Confederation of Kilkenny, decrees, proclamations etc, were done on this press by Br Sarazen. He is mentioned by Père Verdier, the Visitor, as a good religious and a very clever man. He died in 1657?

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
SARAZEN, GEORGE. This Temporal Coadjutor is reported by Pere Verdier to be a good Religious man and a very ingenious person. He had been a Printer, and conducted the press at Kilkenny.

Sedgrave, Christopher, 1603-1632, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2103
  • Person
  • 10 January 1603-23 September 1652

Born: 10 January 1603, Cabra, Dublin
Entered: 04 October 1625, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae province (BELG)
Ordained: 1630/1, Douai, France
Final vows: c 1641, Kilkenny Residence
Died: 23 September 1652

Vice-Superior of the Mission March 1652

Parents were John and Joanna Fagan
Studied Humanities at Antwerp and Philosophy at Douai - was an MA and Doctor
1637 ROM Catalogue Good in all things - fit to teach Humanities. Colericus,
1649 At Kilkenny (45 after his name)
1650 CAT DOB 1604 of Dublin; Ent 1627; Came to Mission 1633. Was Procurator of the Mission for several years, Master of Novices 4 years. Is Confessor and Preacher. Prof of 4 Vows
“I think this is the man referred to in the ‘Aphorismical Discovery’ (Gilberts Pt 5 p75) - observe the author’s words on Augustinians

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied two years Philosophy and three Theology. Knew Irish, English, Spanish and Latin
Taught Humanities, was Confessor and Director of the BVM Sodality
1631/1633/1635 Came to Irish Mission; Was Rector of a Residence, Procurator of Mission and Socius to the Master of Novices. Esteemed and good Preacher.
Appointed to report on Stephen White’s works.
At the celebrated meeting of Theologians with Dr Rothe, he said nothing - “nihil dixit” - on the dispute with the Nuncio (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of John, of Cabra, and Jane née Fagan
Early classical education was received at Antwerp, and then he went for Priestly studies to Douai, where he graduated MA and D Phil before Ent 04 October 1625 Tournai
1627-1631After his First Vows he was sent for studies to Douai and was Ordained there 1630/31
1631-1646 He was then sent to Ireland and the Dublin Residence. He was procurator of the Mission there for many years
1646-1650 Socius to the Novice Master and Procurator of the Novitiate in Kilkenny
1652 When the Mission Superior Robert Nugent was summoned to Europe, he was appointed Vice-Superior of the Mission in March 1652. We are indebted to him for the account of Father Nugent's last days which he wrote at Waterford 16 June 1652.
He seems to have died in Kilkenny in 1652 himself, as his name is not in the 1653 lists

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Christopher Sedgrave (1652)
Christopher Sedgrave, son of John Sedgrave, of Cabra, Co Dublin, and Jane Fagan, was born on or about 10th January, 1603. After studying classics at Antwerp and Douay, and philosophy at Douay, where he gained the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, he entered the Society in the Novitiate of Tournay on 4th October, 1625. When he had completed his theology at Douay in 1631, he returned to Ireland, where he was first engaged in teaching and preaching. He made his solemn profession of four vows about 1641; was Procurator of the Mission for many years, and then Socius of the Master of Novices and Procurator of the Novitiate of Kilkenny for four years (1646-50). When Fr. Robert Nugent was summoned to Europe in March, 1652, Fr Sedgrave was appointed Vice-Superior in his stead, and it is to him we are indebted for the account of Fr Nugent's last days, which he wrote at Waterford on 16th June, 1652. He does not seem to have survived long, but in the confusion of the times the notice of his death has been lost.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Christoper Sedgrave 1603-1652
Christopher Sedgrave, son of John Sedgrave of Cabra County Dublin and Jane Fagan, was born on or about January 10th 1603. After studying classics at Antwerp and Douai, he entered the Society at Tournai in 1625.

He returned to Ireland in 1631 where he was first engaged in teaching and preaching. He was Procurator of Mission for many years, and then Socius to the Master of Novices and Procurator at Kilkenny from 1646-1650.

When Fr Robert Nugent was summoned to Europe in 1652, Fr Sedgrave was appointed Vice-Superior in his stead, and it is to him that we are indebted to for an account of Fr Nugent’s last days, which he wrote in Waterford on June 16th 1652.

Fr Sedgrave does not seem to have survived long after that, but in the confusion of the times, the notice of his death has been lost.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
SEGRAVE, CHRISTOPHER, was one of the Examiners of the MS work of Father Stephen White, “De Sanctis et Antiquitate Hibcrniae” as I find in Father Robert Nugent’s letter, dated Kilkenny, the l0th of January, 1646-7. Two years later, he was the Procurator of the Novitiate at Kilkenny. There Pere Verdier saw this Professed Father, and states that he was about 45 years of age, and “vir optimi judicii”. What became of him later, I have yet to learn.
N.B. A gentleman of the name of Patrick Segrave, had been a special benefactor to the Irish Mission of the Order, as I find in a letter of F. Holiwood, dated 30th June, 1606.

Shelton, Richard, 1611-1671, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2123
  • Person
  • 01 February 1611-27 July 1671

Born: 01 February 1611, Dublin
Entered: 28 February 1629, Back Lane, Dublin
Ordained: 1637, Messina, Sicily, Italy
Final vows: 01 October 1652
Died: 27 July 1671, Dublin

Alias Nathaniel Hart
Superior of the Mission, 09 February 1658-1663

Sometimes went under the name “Tobias Walker and Nathaniel Hart and also Capitaneus” (HIV III pp 460-464)
Studied Philosophy 3 years and Theology 4 in Society
1633 At Douai studying Philosophy
1636 Not in CAT
1642 Prefect of Irish College Rome (Fr Malone was Rector) Was also Minister and Operarius
1649 Marked at Waterford (1629 after his name)
1650 Catalogue DOB 1607. Came to the Mission 1641. Confessor and Preacher. Age 43. Prof 4 Vows
1666 Catalogue Is dwelling near Dublin. On the Mission 22 years. Consultor of the Mission. Engaged in administering the Sacraments and refuting heretics. After 17 weeks imprisonment he was banished for 6 years.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries plus one “Nathaniel Hart”
Knew English, Italian and Latin; Four years Theology in the Society; Taught Humanities; Distinguished Preacher and Confessor
1641 Sent to Ireland (HIB Catalogue 1650 - ARSI)
1666 In Dublin and engaged in missionary duties and in controversial disputations with heretics.
After being imprisoned for 17 weeks, he was deported for six years (HIB Catalogue 1666 - ARSI)
Robert Nugent in a letter dated Wexford 28/02/1643 states that he was daily expecting him from France.
Mercure Verdier the Visitor to the Irish Mission names him in his Report to the General 24 June 1649
He had been stationed at Waterford where he had great repute as a Preacher and teacher; A good Controversialist.
He accompanied the Countess of Beerhaven to Spain, and was then about forty years of age, and had spent twenty in the Society;
He died 1671 in Dublin, deserving well of the Society and elsewhere (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS who calls him Robert)
A Belgian Catalogue mentions him as Richard Shelton arriving at the Professed House, Antwerp 12 September 1656, and leaving 24 April 1657

Nathaniel Hart Entry
Ent pre 1649; RIP post 1659
1659 Superior of Mission and wrote a letter to the General 15 June 1659
Probably identical with Mathias O’Heartegan (corrected in pencil beside to “Richard Shelton”) who had good reason to disguise his name.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already studied Humanities and begun Philosophy before Ent 28 February 1629 Back Lane, Dublin
1631-1637 After First Vows he was sent to Douai for Philosophy and then to Messina in Sicily for Theology where he was Ordained 1637
1637-1641 He made Tertianship and he was sent as Minister and Operarius at Castrogiovanni and Messina.
1641-1644 He was actually sent to Ireland in 1641, but on his way he was kept for a year as Prefect of Studies at the Irish College Rome
1644-1646 Sent to Ireland and firstly to Galway where he taught Humanities
1646 He was sent as Chaplain to Countess Bearhaven on her journey to Spain
When he returned to Ireland he was first sent to Waterford and by 1650 to Dublin
1655 He was was betrayed and arrested in 1655 and deported to the Barbados. There he was not allowed to land there but sent back to Europe. He eventually landed at Antwerp in October, 1656
1657 In spite of his penalties threatened against priests who should care to come back after deportation, he returned to Ireland when appointed as substitute for the Mission Superior Thomas Quin, who had been arrested. He was himself arrested again on his way through England but succeeded in reaching Ireland in the summer of 1657
1658 He was formally appointed Superior of the Mission, 09 February 1658, His term of Office should have ended in 1661 but the newly-designated Superior did not come, and so he continued in office until 1663
He died in Dublin 27 July 1671
He wrote an account of the labours of the Society in Ireland during the thirteen years of the Cromwellian tyranny.
He stoutly opposed Peter Walsh's Loyal Remonstrance.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
Richard Shelton (1657-1663)
Richard Shelton was born in Dublin on 1st February, 1611. His early studies, as far as logic, were made at our Dublin College, and on 28th February, 1629, he entered the Society in the Novitiate of Dublin, recently established. When the heretics suppressed the Jesuit houses and confiscated them to enrich Trinity College, Richard Shelton had to seek his education abroad. He finished his philosophy at Douay, and then was sent to the Province of Sicily. There he studied theology for four years at Palermo, made his tertianship at Trapani, acted as Minister of the College of Enna, or Castro Giovanni, and as Confessor at the Professed House of Messina. In September, 1641, he left Sicily for Ireland. On his way he spent a year at the Irish College, Rome, as Prefect of Studies, under Fr William Malone as Rector. In Ireland he was stationed at Galway (1644-46), teaching, preaching, and confessing. He went as chaplain to the Irish soldiers that accompanied the Countess of Berehaven on her return to Spain, When he came back he was stationed first at Waterford, and then, at the end of 1650, in Dublin, where he made his solemn profession of four vows on 1st October, 1652. He was betrayed in the summer of 1655, and condemned to transportation to the Barbadoes, but before this sentence was carried out he was put on board a ship for Antwerp, and landed there in October, 1656. In spite of the penalties threatened against exiled priests who returned, Fr Shelton did not hesitate a moment when he was ordered to go and act as substitute for Fr Thomas Quin, Superior of the Mission, who had been arrested. He himself was arrested when passing through England, but succeeded in reaching Ireland in the summer of 1657. From being Vice-Superior he was formally appointed Superior of the Mission on 9th February, 1658. His term of office should have come to an end in 1661, but as the new intended Superior never came he continued as Superior till 1663. He wrote an account of the labours of the Society in Ireland during the thirteen years of Cromwellian tyranny. He also distinguished himself by his opposition to the Schismatical Remonstrance of the friar, Peter Walsh, OSF. Fr Shelton died at Dublin on 27th July, 1671.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Richard Shelton 1611-1671
Richard Shelton was born in Dublin in1611 and received his early education as far as Logic in our school in Dublin. Furthermore he entered the novitiate in Dublin.

On the closing of our houses he went to the continent to complete his studies. He left Sicily in 1641 to return to Ireland, but spent a year en route as Prefect of Studies in the Irish College Rome under the Rectorship of Fr William Malone.

Arriving in Ireland he went to Galway for two years teaching and preaching. When the Countess of Berehaven retired to the continent, he accompanied her as Chaplain to Spain. On his return he was stationed at Waterford, then in Dublin, where in 1655 he was arrested and sentenced to the Barbadoes. However, the sentence was not carried out, but Fr Richard was banished to Antwerp. In spite of the penalties threatened him, he returned to once again to act as Superior for Fr Thomas Quin who had been arrested. He himself was full Superior of the Mission 1658-1993.

In correspondence he went by the pseudonym Nathanial Hart.

To his we are indebted for an account of the labours of the Society in Ireland during Cromwellian times.

He passed to his reward on July 27th 1671.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
HART, NATHANIEL. All that I know of him is from his own brief letter, dated the 15th of June, 1659, which shews that he was then Superior of his brethren in Ireland.

SHELTON, RICHARD. In a letter of Father Robert Nugent, dated Waterford the 28th of February, 1643, he says “I daily expect Father Shelton from France”. From Pere Verdier s Report of the 24th of June, 1649, I collect that he had been stationed at Waterford, where he was in great repute as a Preacher; that he had then quitted for Spain, to accompany the Countess of Beerhaven thither; that he was about 40 years of age, of which he had spent 20 in the Society. He died in Dublin, as I find in Father Stephen Rice s Annual Letters, during the year 1671. “in Missions et alibi de Societate bene meritus”.

St Leger, William, 1599-1665, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2143
  • Person
  • 1599-09 June 1665

Born: 1599, County Kilkenny
Entered: 08 October 1621, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 20 March 1627, Cambrai, France
Final vows: 15 August 1635
Died: 09 June 1665, Irish College, Santiago de Compostella, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)

Alias Salinger
Superior of Mission 29 June 1652-December 1652 and 16 July 1661-09 June 1665

Mother was Margaret Duingyn (Duigin?)
Studied Humanities at home and at Antwerp, Philosophy at Douai, was MA
1625 in 1st year Theology at Douai
1637 ROM Catalogue Good in all, fit to teach Humanities
1649 In Kilkenny (50 after his name)
1650 Catalogue DOB 1697. A Confessor and Director of Sodality BVM. Prefect of Residence many years and Consultor of Mission. Age 53, Superior of Kilkenny Residence and of Seminary at Compostella for 6 years
1654 Exiled from Clonmel
1655 Rector of Irish Seminary St Iago CAST
1658 At Compostella Age 57 Soc 36. A Superior at various times in Ireland. Rector and Provincial in Ireland. Rector Irish College. Taught Grammar.

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied Humanities, two years Philosophy and four years Theology in Sicily before Ent. Knew French, English, Irish and Latin.
Taught Humanities for many years; Was Confessor and Director of BVM Sodality; Superior of Residences and Consultor of Irish Mission for many years.
1650 Superior at Kilkenny College, and then moved to Galway when Kilkenny was captured.
1651 He was obliged to flee Ireland, escaped to Spain and succeeded John Lombard as Rector at Compostella, and he died there 09 June 1665 aged 66
He wrote the life of Archbishop of Cashel, Thomas Walsh. 4to Antwerp 1655 (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS)
Writer; Prisoner; Exiled with great cruelty; Professor of Humanities; Rector of Compostella Residence; Superior of the Irish Mission; Of great gentleness and prudence; Educated in Sicily and Belgium (cf Foley’s Collectanea)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan :
Son of Thomas and Margaret née Duigan
Early education was at Antwerp. He also graduated MA and D Phil at Douai before Ent 08 October 1621 Tournai
1623-1627 After First Vows he was sent a year of Regency at Douai and then stayed there for Theology, and was Ordained at Cambrai 20 March 1627
1628 Sent to Ireland and Kilkenny, and was later Superior at the Kilkenny Residence, and then Rector of the College. He identified himself with the small group of Ormondist partisans in the Kilkenny community whose approval of the Supreme Council's defiance of Rinuccini was reported to Rome and caused the General to send Mercure Verdier on Visitation to the Irish Mission.
1652 Superior of the Mission on 29 June 1652, but six months later was deported to Spain. He arrived in San Sebastián and was then sent to the Irish College Santiago, where he continued as Superior of the Irish Mission until 27 June 1654.
1654-1661 Rector of Irish College Santiago an Office he held for seven years
1661 Reappointed Superior of the Irish Mission 16 July 1661 but ill health prevented him from returning to Ireland. This meant there were two Superiors of the Irish Mission - William in Spain, and Richard Shelton in Ireland. He died at Santiago 09 June 1665

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
St Leger, William
by Terry Clavin

St Leger, William (1599–1665), Jesuit, was born in Co. Kilkenny in September 1599, the son of Thomas St Leger and his wife Margaret Duignan. He left Ireland to study classics at Antwerp and philosophy at Douai and graduated MA and D.Phil. On 8 October 1621 he entered the Society of Jesus at Tournai. Ordained a priest at Cambrai on 20 March 1627, he was professed of the four vows of his order on 15 August 1635. In 1628 he had returned to Ireland, where he taught at Kilkenny city. Following the 1641 rebellion and the establishment in 1642 of the Catholic Confederation of Ireland, St Leger was prominent as a supporter of an alliance with the protestant royalists led by James Butler (qv), earl of Ormond. Nonetheless, in 1646 St Leger supported the decision by GianBattista Rinuccini (qv), papal nuncio to Ireland, to excommunicate those who adhered to the peace between the supreme council of the confederation and Ormond.

However, when Rinuccini excommunicated the supporters of the supreme council's cessation with the protestant forces in Munster in the summer of 1648, St Leger strongly opposed him. Rinuccini was particularly bitter over the refusal of St Leger, and the Jesuit order in general, to back him in 1648. After the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland (1649–52), St Leger was appointed superior of the Irish Jesuits on 29 June 1652, but he was obliged to flee to Spain in January 1653 after the authorities banished all catholic clergy from Ireland upon pain of death. He settled in Spain, where he became rector of the Irish college at Compostela. In 1655 he published a life of Thomas Walsh (qv), archbishop of Cashel during the confederate period. This work was criticised by Rinuccini's supporters for failing to mention the controversies of 1648 and St Leger's own role in them. In 1661 he was re-appointed head of the Jesuit mission in Ireland but ill health prevented him from returning home to assume this position. He died 9 June 1665 at Compostela.

Comment. Rinucc., vi, 188; Edmund Hogan, Chronological catalogue of the Irish members of the Society of Jesus (n.d.), 30; The whole works of Sir James Ware concerning Ireland, ed. and trans. W. Harris (1764), ii, 144; Gilbert, Contemp. hist., i, 277; Gilbert, Ir. confed., vi, 69, 277, 314; Michael J. Hynes, The mission of Rinuccini (1932), 131, 265; ODNB

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
William St Leger (1652-1654)
William St Leger, son of Thomas St Leger, or Salinger, and Margaret Duigin, was born in the county of Kilkenny in September, 1599. He went to Belgium in 1617; studied rhetoric at Antwerp and philosophy at Douay, where he gained the degrees of Licentiate and Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. He entered the Novitiate of the Society at Tournay on 8th October, 1621. After teaching grammar a year at Douay, he studied theology there for four years, and was ordained on 20th March, 1627, at Cambray. He returned to Ireland in 1628, and was usually stationed at Kilkenny, where he made his solemn profession of four vows on 5th August, 1639. He was Superior of the Kilkenny Residence and Director of the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin for many years. Then he became Rector of the College at Kilkenny, Consultor of the Mssion, and, finally, on 29th June, 1652, Superior of the Mission. When on 6th January, 1653, an edict banishing all priests from Ireland within ten days was published, Fr St Leger was lying ill in a friend's house at Kilkenny, but his weakness won him no respite. He had to be carried on a stretcher for twenty Irish miles to a seaport, where he was put on board a ship bound for San Sebastian, where he arrived before 26th April, 1653. After some time he took up his residence at the Irish College of Santiago. He continued Superior of the Mission, though resident in Spain, until 27th June, 1654, when he became Rector of the Irish College of Santiago, a position he held for the next seven years.

William St Leger (1661-1663)
Fr William St Leger (for whom vide supra 1652-54) was appointed Superior of the Irish Mission on 16th July, 1661, but was prevented by ill-health from returning, so that for the next two years there were two Superiors of the Irish Mission, one in Spain, Fr William St Leger, and one in Ireland, Fr Richard Shelton. Fr St Leger died at the Irish College of Santiago on 9th June, 1665. He was an accomplished Latinist, and to his pen we are indebted for many treatises which throw light on the state of the Catholic religion in general, and on the history of the activities of the Society of Jesus in Ireland in particular, from the earliest times down to the year 1662.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father William St Leger 1599-1665
William St Leger was born in Kilkenny in 1599.

Having joined the Society at Tournai he returned to Ireland after his ordination in 1628. He was a fluent speaker of English, Latin and Irish and taught classics for many years. He became Superior of the Kilkenny Residence, Director of the Sodality, Consultor of the Mission, and finally Superior in 1652. His zeal for souls made him a special object of hatred for the Puritans.

When an edict was published in 1653 banishing all priests from Ireland within ten days. Fr William was lying ill at a friends house, He was transported on a stretcher to the nearest seaport and put on a ship bound for San Sebastian. He made port in April, having been at sea since January. He took up residence at the Irish College Santiago, where he became Rector for seven years.

In 1661 he was again appointed Superior of the Irish Mission, but through ill health never returned to Ireland. For two years there were two Superiors, Fr St Leger in Spain and Fr Richard Shelton in Ireland. The difficulty was resolved by Fr St Leger’s death at Santiago on June 9th 1665.

We are indebted to him for many treatises on the State of the Catholic Religion and of the Society of Jesus in Ireland at that period. He is also the author of a life of Thomas Walsh, Archbishop of Cashel who died in Compostella.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
ST. LEGER, WILLIAM. The 1st time that I meet with him is in a letter written by him from his native place, Kilkenny, on the 3rd of January, 1646-7, wherein he speaks in the highest terms of the merits of Peter Francis Scarampi, the Oratorian, and Envoy of the Holy See to the Irish Nation. Pere Verdier found him two years later superior of the College at Kilkenny. When that City was taken, he removed to Galway. In 1651, the success of the Puritan faction compelled him to seek safety in flight. Retiring to Compostella, he ended his days in peace, on the 9th of June, 1665, aet. 66. We have from his pen the Life of Thomas Walsh, Archbishop of Caascll, 4to. Antwerp, 1655, who died at Compostella.

Stanihurst, Peter, 1599-1627, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2149
  • Person
  • 01 November 1599-27 May 1627

Born: 01 November 1599, Brussels, Belgium
Entered: 18 September 1616, Mechelen, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)
Ordained; 15 March 1625, Antwerp, Belgium
Died: 27 May 1627, San Sebastian, Spain - Flanders Province (FLAN)

Brother of William - RIP 1663

Son or Richard and Ellen Copley (Richard - -RIP Brussels 1618 - studied for 6 years after the death of his wife) brother of William
Fellow Novice of Jan Berchmans
1626 A P Stanihurst is in the FLAN-BEL Province
In 1639 he wrote 10 “distichs in Theobald Stapleton’s “Irish Catechism” where he signs P Stanihurstus, Societ. Jesu, Hibernus
An Eloquium on him in “Arch de l’état, Brussels", Carton 1005 I, died 29 June 1627

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Richard and Helen née Copley and cousin of Protestant Bishop Ussher. Brother of William
Studied Humanities at Brussels under the Jesuits before Entry.
Fellow Novice of Jan Berchmans
Irish Mission Superior asked the General to send hoim or his brother William to teach at the irish College Compostella
Death date RIP 27 May 1627 Spain (before FV - Carton 1005 I. Archives de l’État, Brussels; Hogan’s Irish List; Mechelen Album)

Note regarding Peter and William Stanihurst taken from the leaves of Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS by Fr Morris SJ :
1644 Stanihurst : since about the year 1630, a good Father of the Society that lived in this town (Louvain) preached here on holidays. He was cousin german to the Superioress and her sister; he was named Father Stanihurst, whose mother was their father’s own sister, married to an Irish gentleman of good worth in his own country (St Monica’s Chronicle p 497) The Superioress, elected 25/02/1637, was Sister Mary Copley (St Monica’s Chronicle p 497). She and her sister Helen were daughters of William Copley of Gatton, Surrey, and heir of Lord Thomas Copley, Baron of Wells (ibid p120), that is Sir Thomas Copley who claimed the Barony of Wells. Richard Stanihurst, the father of Peter and William, became Chaplain to their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess Albert and Isabella, after the death of his wife Helen Copley (ita P Waldack). Of James Stanihurst, the father of Richard, Father Edmund Campion says in the preface to his “History of Ireland” : “Notwithstanding, simple and naked as it is, it could never have growen to any proportion in such post haste, except I had enterd into such familiar societie and daylie table talke with the worshipful esquire, James Stanihurst, Recorder of Dublin, who beside all courtesie and hospitality, and a thousand loving turnes not heere to be recited, both by word and written monuments, and y the benefit of his own library, nourished most effectively mine endeavours. Dublin 1633, reprinted 1809”
Richard Stanihurst was uncle to Ussher and cousin to Henry Fitzsimon. He wrote several works on which we see Sir J Ware’s “Irish Writers”, Webb’s Irish Biography. he became a priest upon his wife’s death, and Chaplain to the Archduke of Austria.
Barnaby Rich, Gent, in his “Description of Ireland” says R Stanihurst was a great alchymist. Father Holiwood often wrote to the General to have Peter and William sent to Ireland (Hogan)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Richard and Helen née Copley. Brother of William. His Grandfather James was sometime Recorder of Dublin.
Contemporary in Noviceship of Jan Berchmans
1618-1623 After First Vows he was sent first to Antwerp and then to Bruges for studies. The he was sent on a year of Regency at Bergues Saint Winoc. Although born in Belgium, he was considered eligible for the Irish Mission, and in fact the Irish Mission Superior had hoped that he might do a Regency at the Irish College Santiago.
1623-1625 He was then sent back to Antwerp for Theology and he was Ordained there 1625
1625 He was then appointed a Naval Chaplain and so was living at Dunkirk. During the year 1626/27, when his ship put in at San Sebastian, he set out for Madrid. It is known that he preached to the sailors in Holy Week (Easter Sunday was on 4 April 1627, and that he died shortly after.

Stanihurst, William, 1601-1663, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2150
  • Person
  • 15 June 1601-10 January 1663

Born: 15 June 1601, Brussels, Belgium
Entered: 25 September 1617, Mechelen, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)
Ordained: 30 March 1630, Mechelen, Belgium
Final Vows: 11 June 1634
Died: 10 January 1663, Brussels, Belgium - Flanders Province (FLAN)

Brother of Peter - RIP 1627

Son or Richard and Ellen Copley (Richard - -RIP Brussels 1618 - studied for 6 years after the death of his wife) brother of Peter
Fellow Novice of Jan Berchmans
1646 Catalogue Taught Humanities. Minister of Philosophers. Preacher in Flemish and English; Prefect of Sodality
Name is in 1619 and 1626 HIB Catalogue

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Richard and Helen née Copley and cousin of Protestant Bishop Ussher. Brother of Peter - RIP 1627
Studied Humanities at Brussels under the Jesuits before Ent.
Fellow Novice of Jan Berchmans
Writer; Preacher; Man of great piety
He resided mostly at Brussels, and for twenty-five years was a zealous preacher in the English and Flemish languages. Full of modesty, charity and tender piety, he was the delight of his brethren, and the grace and ornament of religion. (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS; Hogan’s Irish list; de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”)
He wrote seven or eight books, which went through many editions, and one translated into French, Spanish, Flemish, Dutch, German, Polish and Hungarian.
1626 HIB Catalogue named

Note regarding Peter and William Stanihurst taken from the leaves of Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS by Fr Morris SJ :
1644 Stanihurst : since about the year 1630, a good Father of the Society that lived in this town (Louvain) preached here on holidays. He was cousin german to the Superioress and her sister; he was named Father Stanihurst, whose mother was their father’s own sister, married to an Irish gentleman of good worth in his own country (St Monica’s Chronicle p 497) The Superioress, elected 25/02/1637, was Sister Mary Copley (St Monica’s Chronicle p 497). She and her sister Helen were daughters of William Copley of Gatton, Surrey, and heir of Lord Thomas Copley, Baron of Wells (ibid p120), that is Sir Thomas Copley who claimed the Barony of Wells. Richard Stanihurst, the father of Peter and William, became Chaplain to their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess Albert and Isabella, after the death of his wife Helen Copley (ita P Waldack). Of James Stanihurst, the father of Richard, Father Edmund Campion says in the preface to his “History of Ireland” : “Notwithstanding, simple and naked as it is, it could never have growen to any proportion in such post haste, except I had enterd into such familiar societie and daylie table talke with the worshipful esquire, James Stanihurst, Recorder of Dublin, who beside all courtesie and hospitality, and a thousand loving turnes not heere to be recited, both by word and written monuments, and y the benefit of his own library, nourished most effectively mine endeavours. Dublin 1633, reprinted 1809”
Richard Stanihurst was uncle to Ussher and cousin to Henry Fitzsimon. He wrote several works on which we see Sir J Ware’s “Irish Writers”, Webb’s Irish Biography. he became a priest upon his wife’s death, and Chaplain to the Archduke of Austria.
Barnaby Rich, Gent, in his “Description of Ireland” says R Stanihurst was a great alchymist. Father Holiwood often wrote to the General to have Peter and William sent to Ireland (Hogan)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Richard and Helen née Copley. Brother of Peter. His Grandfather James was sometime Recorder of Dublin.
1619-1626 After First Vows he was sent for Philosophy first to Antwerp and then Louvain. He was then sent for four years Regency to Oudenaarde and Courtrai (Kortrijk).
1626-1630 He was then sent to Louvain for Theology and was ordained at Mechelen 30 March 1630
1631-1632 Made Tertianship at Lier.
Over the next fifteen years the Superior of the Irish Mission made strenuous efforts to have William transcribed to Ireland. The Belgian Superiors said he didn’t know any Irish, and so this was used as a reason not to send him.
1632-1650 He was sent as Operarius to Louvain where he gained some reputation as a Director of a Sodality for jurists.
1650-1662 Sent to work at the Church in Antwerp, and was Spiritual Father to the Irish Seminarians there (1654-1662)
He died at Brussels 10 January 1663
Like his brother, he was a contemporary at Mechelen with Jan Berchmans and during the diocesan process of enquiry into the virtues of Jan, he was was summoned to give evidence before the Episcopal Tribunal.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father William Stanihurst SJ 1601-1663
In Brussels in the year 1601 was born William Stanihurst, of Irish parentage. Together with his brother Peter, he entered the noviceship at Mechlin, where they wewre fellow novices of St John Berchmans.

As a priest, Fr William resided chiefly at Brussels, where for twenty five years he was a renowned and zealous preacher, both in Flemish and English.

In 1630 he was transferred to Louvain, where for nearly thirty years he had charge of the famous Sodality of Our Lady. He was a writer as well as a preacher, one of his works being translated into seven different European languages.

He was a man of great piety, modesty and charity, and was spoken of as “the delight of his brethren and the ornament of religion”.

His father was Richard Stanihurst the uncle of James Usher, and cousin of Fr Henry Fitzsimon, kinsman of the martyr Jesuit poet, Robert Southwell, and friend of Blessed Edmund Campion.

When the plague broke out in Louvain, Fr William devoted himself to the care of the sick and was struck down by the pestilence. As he lay at the point of death, he made a vow to St Ignatius and immediately recovered. He was sent to Brussels where he died soon after on 10th January 1662.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
STANIHURST, WILLIAM, of Irish parents, but was actually born at Brussels. There he chiefly resided, and for 25 years was a zealous preacher in the English and Dutch languages. Full of modesty, charity, and tender piety, he was the delight of his Brethren, and the grace and ornament of Religion. He died on the 10th of January, 1663, aet. 61. Soc. 40. He has left as monuments of his piety and industry,

  1. “Album Marianum”. Folio, Louvain, 1641.
  2. “Regio Mortis”. 8vo. Antwerp, 1652.
  3. “Thesaurus Moralis Francisci Labatae, noris commentationibus auctus”. Folio, Antwerp, 1652.
  4. “De infernorum Ergastulo.” Antwerp, 1655
  5. “Dei immortalis in mortali corpore Patientis Historia” 8vo. Antwerp, 1660, pp. 408.
  6. “Quotidiana Christiani hominis Tessera”. 4to. Antwerp, 1661.
  7. “Veteris hominis per expensa Quatuor Novissima Metamorphosis”. 8vo. Antwerp, 1661.
    F. Archdeacon (who must well have known the pious author) mentions two other works; but which perhaps were only ready for the press : “Thesaurus Concionum” and “de Passionc Domini”.

Verdon, John, 1846-1918, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2205
  • Person
  • 18 July 1846-02 January 1918

Born: 18 July 1846, Drogheda, County Louth
Entered: 11 September 1865, Milltown Park, Dublin
Ordained: 1879
Final vows: 02 February 1886
Died: 02 January 1918, St Francis Xavier's, Gardiner Street, Dublin

Early education at St Stanislaus College SJ, Tullabeg

by 1868 at Amiens France (CAMP) studying
by 1873 at Laval France (FRA) studying
by 1872 at Laval France (FRA) studying
by 1875 at Antwerp Institute Belgium (BELG) Regency
by 1877 at Innsbruck Austria (ASR-HUN) studying
by 1885 at Roehampton London (ANG) making Tertianship

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
After his Noviceship he made studies at Laval, did Regency teaching and Prefecting at Tullabeg and Clongowes, and taught English in Antwerp for two years.
1876 He was sent to Innsbruck for Theology.
1879-1884 He was sent as Prefect and Minister to Clongowes.
1886 He was sent to Gardiner St as Minister, and then at the urgent request of the then Rector of Clongowes, returned there as Minister. He returned to Gardiner as Minister and remained in that job for some years. Later he was sent to Galway, but returned again to Gardiner St as Minister. This time he was also a very useful Operarius and Prefect of the Church. He was a very forcible Preacher with a fine voice and presence.
1911 He had a stroke, and for six years led a most patient life, edifying everybody. He was very neat about his room and person.
He was one of the best known Jesuits in the Diocese, and greatly esteemed by the Archbishop and the clergy.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973

Father John Verdon 1846-1918
Fr John Verdon was born at Drogheda on July 18th 1846. He received his early education in our College at Tullabeg. He entered the Society in 1865 at Milltown where he did his noviceship under Fr Sturzo.

His philosophical studies were carried out at Laval, after which he did his Colleges at Tullabeg and Clongowes, and also at Antwerp, where he taught English for some years. Having completed his Theological studies at Innsbruck, he was ordained in 1879.

After his return to Ireland he was a master at Clongowes and then at Gardiner Street. Except for a short spell at Galway, all his priestly life was spent at Gardiner Street, both as Minister and Operarius.

He was one of the best known and esteemed Jesuits of the Dublin diocese, beloved of the people and clergy, from the Archbishop down. As a preacher he was forcible with a fine voice and presence.

In 1911 he had a stroke, and for six years he led a most patient life of suffering, to the great edification of everybody. He died a most peaceful and happy death, surrounded by his brethren, on January 2nd 1918.

Wadding, Peter, 1583-1644, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2210
  • Person
  • 1583-13 September 1644

Born: 1583, Waterford
Entered: 24 October 1601, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: 18 October 1609, Louvain, Belgium
Final vows: 22 January 1617
Died: 13 September 1644, University of Graz, Austria - Austriacae Province (ASR)

Son of Thomas and his 1st wife Mary née Walsh. Youngest Brother of Walter and Michael. Half Brother of Luke and Thomas. 1st Cousin of Ambrose and Luke OFM

Parents Thomas and Mary Walsh
Had studied Humanities in Ireland and at Douai, and Philosophy at Douai - MA
1609 At Maastricht FLAN-BEL teaching Poetry and Rhetoric
1611 At Louvain in 3rd year Theology
1617 Not in 1615 CAT but by 1617 in Belgium Age 33 Soc 15
1625 At Louvain with John Bollandus - a talent for teaching Latin, Scholastic and Moral Theology, Philosophy and also “conversandi”.
1630-1639 At St Clement College Prague. Professor of Theology and “Decanus”. President of “Casum Domesticorum et Congregationis Majoris” By 1632 is Chancellor of University, Consultor of the Provincial and rector. Has been teacher of Philosophy and Theology and has been Prefect of the Lowew and Higher Schools. Also a Confessor in the Church and Catechist. “Remarkable for his talent and judgement and experience in business and is proficient in letters. He has the talent to be Chancellor, Spiritual Father and Preside over Cases of Conscience”.
“A pity while Chancellor he didn’t gather gather round him some of the talented Waterford Jesuits”
In Waterford College there is a copy of “Lessius ad usum Petri Wadingi SJ Waterford”

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Studied Humanities for seven years in Ireland and then at Douai graduating MA
Ent 24 October 1601 by FLAN Provincial Oliveraeus but began his Noviceship 28/11/1601 at Tournai (Tournay Diaries MSS, “Archives de l’État, Brussels n 1016, fol 418)
Professor of Theology at Louvain, Antwerp, Prague and Graz; Chancellor of two Universities at Prague; Writer; A very holy man;
Published a work “De Filii Dei Incarnatione opus” (cf de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ” for his works)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Thomas and his 1st wife Mary née Walsh. Youngest Brother of Walter and Michael. Half Brother of Luke and Thomas. 1st Cousin of Ambrose and Luke OFM
Had studied Classics in Ireland and Belgium graduating MA at Douai before Ent 24 October 1601 Tournai.
1603-1608 After First Vows in Liège, he revised some studies there and was sent on Regency to Maastricht (1604) teaching Poetry and Rhetoric.
1608-1612 He was sent to Louvain for Theology and was Ordained there 18 October 1609
1612-1621 Once he had finished his formation he was sent to Antwerp to teach Controversial Theology. For a time at Antwerp he was also Prefect of Studies.
1621-1629 Sent to teach Dogmatic Theology at Louvain - and graduated DD in 1626
1629-1631 He was transcribed from Flanders to Bohemia. His scholarly reputation had preceded him, and in addition to the Chair of Dogmatic Theology at the University of Prague he was honoured by being elected Chancellor.
1631-1641 On the occupation of Prague by the Lutherans, 1631, he fled with the clergy and nobles to Olmütz (Olomouc). His stay was short here, and thanks to the recovery of Prague by Wallenstein and he was back at his post in May 1632. Because of controversy between the Emperor and the Archbishop of Prague over the rights of the Jesuit controlled University, Father Wadding was withdrawn by the General from Prague in the Summer of 1641.
1641 Sent to University of Graz to teach Canon Law, and died there 13 September 1644
Many appeals were made to the General for his transfer to Ireland, even as late as 1641, but each appeal resulted in the General deciding that his gifts were more valuable in Europe.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Wadding, Peter
by David Murphy

Wadding, Peter (1583–1644), Jesuit priest, theologian, and chancellor of the University of Prague (1629–41), was born in July 1583 in Waterford, son of Thomas Wadding and Mary Wadding (née Walsh). On entering the Society of Jesus in 1601 he recorded that both of his parents were of the catholic nobility. Five of his brothers also became Jesuits, and his cousins included Fr Luke Wadding (qv), Archbishop Thomas Walsh (qv) of Cashel, and Bishop Nicholas French (qv) of Ferns. It is perhaps not surprising, therefore, that he chose a priestly career, and after initial schooling in Ireland he travelled to Douai (1587), where he studied classics and philosophy, graduating MA. On 24 October 1601 he entered the Jesuit noviciate at Tournai, aged 18. Further studies in philosophy, rhetoric, and theology followed, and in October 1609 he was ordained priest.

Completing his theological studies at Louvain, he seemed destined to return to Ireland. Hugh O'Neill (qv), the exiled earl of Tyrone, had tried to secure his services for the Irish mission but Wadding's superiors wished to keep him in the Low Countries. He therefore remained there, taught theology at Louvain, and was also a professor of philosophy at the Jesuit college in Utrecht from 1615. One of his students at Utrecht was John van Bolland, founder of the scholarly Bollandist movement in the Society of Jesus. Around 1616 Wadding took up the chair of moral theology at the Jesuit college in Antwerp. In 1620 he engaged in a series of private discussions with Simon Bischop or Episcopius, a leader of the Arminians, in the hope of converting him to catholicism. He later sent Bischop two letters (published after his death), one on the rule of the faith, the other on the worship of images. In June 1621 he chaired a public theological debate where the Irish Jesuit, Peter Darcy, defended his theses on grace and predestination.

In 1629 he succeeded Fr Adam Tanner, SJ, one of the most renowned Jesuit theologians of the period, as professor of theology and chancellor of the University of Prague. He was immediately drawn into the controversy surrounding the concord signed between the pope and Ferdinand II, the Contractus Salis. In 1629 he replied to the attacks on the papacy and the Society of Jesus in an anonymous pamphlet, Disceptatio placida. In 1630 he was appointed to the archiepiscopal consistorium and was declared consistorial theologian, the first Jesuit to be appointed to that position in Bohemia. He lived in Prague during the height of the thirty years war and, after the defeat of the catholic army at Breitenfeld (1631), was forced to flee to Olmutz (Olomouc) in Moravia, where he served briefly as chancellor of the university, returning to Prague in 1632. In 1633 he was appointed as a member of the third provincial congregation of the Jesuit province of Bohemia.

His period at Prague was somewhat overshadowed by a long-running controversy with the archbishop of the city, Count Ernest Adalbert von Harrach. Prague initially had two universities, the Jesuit University and the Carolina, the old university founded by Charles IV in 1345. These had been amalgamated in 1623 by Ferdinand II and were now known as the Carolo-Ferdinandea. Under Ferdinand's decree, it was stipulated that the rector of the Jesuit college should also be the chancellor of the combined universities. Archbishop von Harrach disputed this, maintaining that he should be chancellor, and the controversy dragged on for years. The noted pamphleteer Gaspar Schopp published an anonymous piece attacking the Jesuit fathers. In 1634 Wadding replied with his Brevis refutatio calumniarum quas Collegio Societatis Jesu Pragensi etc. In this publication he outlined the history of the controversy and condemned Schopp for his attack on the Jesuits. Schopp's work was condemned in Rome and burned by the public hangman in Madrid, and he was later expelled from Austrian and Roman soil. (The controversy over the combined colleges was not finally resolved until Ferdinand III took an active part in deciding the issue.)

Wadding later published a major theological work on the subject of the Incarnation, Tractatus de Incarnatione (Antwerp, 1634). In 1637 he preached the sermon at the funeral obsequies for Ferdinand II in the Metropolitan Church in Prague. He later presented Ferdinand III with an address of welcome, published as Oratio Pragae dicta in Ferdinandi III (1637).

In July 1641, with the controversy over the chancellorship of Prague still raging, he was ordered by his superiors to go to Gratz, where he taught canon law. He published his second theological work entitled De contractibus in 1644. He died in Gratz 13 September 1644. The letters that he had sent to Bischop were still extant, and were later published in Dutch as Twee brieven van den gelerden Peter Wading in sijn leven Jesuit tot Antwerpen (Amsterdam, 1649). Other works, which were published using a pseudonym, were Carmina varia et alia spectantia ad disciplinas humaniores and Tractatus aliquot contra haereticos. The universities at Prague and Gratz (in Styria, Austria) later commissioned portraits of him. There is a collection of his papers in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, which includes over thirty manuscript treatises.

Webb; Allibone; Edmund Hogan, SJ, Distinguished Irishmen of the sixteenth century (1894); id., ‘Worthies of Waterford and Tipperary: 2 – Father Peter Wadding', Waterford Arch. Soc. Jn., iii, 2 (1897), 183–201; Paul O'Dea, SJ, ‘Father Peter Wadding, SJ: chancellor of the University of Prague 1629–1641’, Studies, xxx (Sept. 1941), 337–48; Louis McRedmond, To the greater glory: a history of the Irish Jesuits (1991); information from Fergus O'Donoghue, SJ, Jesuit archives, Dublin

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
WADDING, PETER, S.T.D. born in Waterford, A.D. 1580; at the age of 21 entered the Novitiate at Tournay. Several Universities were proud of numbering him amongst their Professors; but his prodigious learning was eclipsed by the splendour of his virtues. He died at Gratz on the 13th of September, 1644.
Under a borrowed name he published “Carmina Varia”, “Tractatus aliquot contra Hereticos”,
Under his own name he wrote a Latin Treatise to refute the Pamphlet entitled “Flagellum Jesuiticum” 4to. Nigrae, 1634, “Tractatus de Incarnatione”. 4to. Antwerp, 1636, pp. 656.
Also a Latin Oration at the inauguration of Ferdinand III at Prague, in 1636.
His Treatise, “De Contractibus”, 4to, was printed at Gratz, the year after his death

Watters, Malachy, 1574-1646, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2233
  • Person
  • 27 March 1574-24 October 1646

Born: 27 March 1574, County Meath
Entered: 14 August 1611, Tournai, Belgium - Belgicae Province (BELG)
Ordained: Douai - pre Entry
Died: 24 October 1646, County Meath

Alias MacConuisce

Mother Jane Alpine
Studied Philosophy 2 years at Douai
1611 BELG Catalogue Mr D Malachy (Mac an Uisce) a priest who in August will have finished Philosophy is not very talented, but comes from Ulster a part of Ireland where the help of our Fathers is much needed. Would be useful in Ireland or Scotland
1615 at St Omer College studying Moral Theology
1621 Catalogue On the Mission 6 years; middling health; talent, judgement and prudence mediocre; has made profession; choleric; Confessor
1622 Catalogue Fitz Valter or Fitzwalter or Walter in Dublin district
1626 Catalogue in Ireland
1637 Catalogue Mediocre in all things

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Two Entries : Malachy Young (1); Malcahy Fitzwalter (2)
Malachy Young - DOB 1578 Meath; Ent 1609; RIP 1646-1649
Malcahy Fitzwalter - DOB 1578 Uster; Ent 1611; RIP 1626-1636 Ireland

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Patrick and Joan née Alpine
His early education was in Ireland, and he studied Rhetoric under the Jesuits at Tournai, Antwerp and Lille. He then studied Philosophy under the Jesuits at Douai, and then Theology at the Irish College there and was Ordained before Ent 14 August 1611 Tournai
1613-1617 After First Vows he was sent for studies to St Omer
1615 Early in 1715 Fr Holywood asked the General to have him sent to the Irish Mission, but it would appear that he did not arrive until 1617
1617 Sent to Ireland and mainly to Meath and to the Dublin Residence, and he taught Humanities in the city.
With other Jesuits of Old Irish stock he seems never to have enjoyed the confidence of the Superior and Consultors who easily found fault with Jesuits of old-Irish stock. In the 1630s a determined effort was made to send him back to Belgium, because he had allegedly struck an Anglo-Irish nobleman, but this effort did not succeed. He seems to have still been at the Dublin Residence in 1641 in indifferent health, and after that it is assumed, that following the occupation of Dublin by the Parliamentarians, that he ministered in his native Meath where he died 24 October 1646, not yet having taken Final Vows
1622 Irish College Douai “Aquatici”
1621,1622, 1637 & 1646 HIB Catalogues “Fitzwalter” (1621) and “Walter” (1622) and “Yong” (1637 and “Yonghe” (1646)
His own declaration on Ent at Tournai “Ego Malachias Macanuake Medensis vel aliter Walter Ibernus”

White, Stephen, 1575-1647, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2255
  • Person
  • 1575-23 April 1647

Born: 1575, Clonmel, Co Tipperary
Entered: 13 October 1596, Villagarcía, Galicia, Spain - Castellanae Province (CAST)
Ordained: c 1601, Salamanca, Spain
Final Vows: 06 January 1613
Died: 23 April 1647, Galway Residence

Younger Brother of Thomas - RIP 1622; Uncle of Peter White - RIP 1678; Cousin of William White - RIP 1625

His name appears on a list of 8 who got a BA from Salamanca University in 1595 and then entered
1597 At Villagarcía College Age 22 Soc 6. Already a BA and studying Theology
1600 At Salamanca studying Theology Age 25 Soc 3
1603 Age 29 Soc 7. Professor of Arts at Salamanca University
1605 Came from CAST to GER SUP
1606-1609 At Ingolstadt lecturing in Theology. Age 32 Soc 10 and a Doctor of Divinity. Confessor and “Oreses Religiosorum in Convictu”
1610-1323 At Dilingen teaching Sacred Scripture “vires mediocres”
1612 Professor of Scholastic Theology at Dillingen and Pres of Casus. Confessor
1623-1627 Went to Pont-á-Mousson (CAMP) - Confessor and Spiritual Father to Germans
1628-1630 At Metz Confessor, Spiritual Father and Prefect of Cases
1630 Came to Irish Mission
Usher praised White in his Collectanea 1621 Tom V & VI)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronolgica”:
c1617 he was in Bavaria
1634 Distinguished Professor of Theology (IER)
The Protestant Archbishop Ussher in “Primordia” p 400 calls him a man of exquisite knowledge in the antiquities, not only of Ireland, but also of other nations.
Robert Nugent, Superior of Irish Mission in a letter from Kilkenny 10 January 1646 to Charles Sangri, speaks of his works which he had sent to censors for examination.
Professor of Theology at Dillingen, Ingolstadt and Pont-à-Mousson etc.; Writer; Antiquarian;
Called a “Polyhistor” by Raderus, Colgan and others on account of his extraordinary learning.
(cf Oliver Stonyhurts MSS; Dean Reeves “Memoir of Stephen White”; de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”; De Buck “Archéologie Irlandaise”)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Had already graduated with a BA in Arts and in Theology abroad before Ent 13 October 1596 Villagarcía
1598-1601 After First Vows he was sent to Royal College Salamanca for studies and was Ordained there c 1601
1601-1605 Taught Philosophy at Irish College Salamanca
1605-1609 To the disappointment of his Spanish Superiors he was withdrawn by the General from CAST and appointed to a Chair of Theology at the College of Ingolstadt in the Upper German Province (GER SUP). At the end of two years here he was reported to the General as having departed from the ratio studiorum in his teaching. His lectures were represented to the General as “partly temerarious, partly dangerous and in great part to be retracted”,
1609 In September 1609 General ordered that Stephen be dismissed from his post and sent back to Ireland. But his health was never robust and his physician decided against the return journey to the Irish Mission. Later the General was to learn that White had not been so unorthodox, he had merely been expounding the opinions of Vasquez and was not the only Jesuit who approved of that scholar's teaching.
1610-1622 He was sent to the College of Dilingen, and he was not reinstated as a professor of Theology for the next two years. But this temporary disgrace incurred at Ingolstadt proved to be providential. The two years of freedom from the lecture-hall were not spent idly by Stephen. From this time dates his interest in the rich manuscript materials for Irish history and hagiography buried away in German monastic libraries. By Autumn, 1612, he had composed a work on the lives of Irish Saints but the General ordered that the book be submitted to rigid censorship in case it might cause offence to people of other countries. That same Autumn, he resumed his theology lectures in Dilingen, and was congratulated by the General who warned him, however, not to deflect from the 'sententia ordinaria". During these years he was professor, for a time, of Sacred Scripture. He remained in Dilingen as professor of dogmatic theology until 1622
1622-1627 Ever since 1620 White was anxious to leave the Upper German province and in 1622 was allowed to pass to CAMP where he was assigned to the University of Pont-à-Mousson. Although he had been advised in advance that he could not expect a Chair in that University, he taught Theology in fact there over the next three years, although his status might be better described, perhaps, as coach and not professor. But the five years, 1622/27, spent by him at Pont-à-Mousson were mostly taken up with historical research. For within a year of his arrival, 1623, he had ready for the press his celebrated “Apologia pro Hibernia”. But the General stopped the printing of this work at Antwerp.
1627-1630 He was transferred to Metz but held no teaching post there.
1630-1644 The General in response to requests from the Irish Mission allowed White to return to Ireland. Very little is known with certainty about his career on the Irish Mission. There is no mention of his name again in the sources until 1637 when the CATS simply recapitulated his past career but gave no hint of his address or occupation that year. It also said that his was in poor health. That Winter he wrote to the General asking that the Will which he had made at Dilingen before his final profession should be implemented to the benefit of the Irish Mission. His well-known letter to John Colgan O.F.M., 31 January 1640, implies that he had been engaged in research work ever since his return to Ireland and that he had spent the previous decade for the most part at Dublin where he had access to the library or Archbishop James Ussher.
1640 His later years, after the Puritan occupation of Dublin were spent in Galway. Correspondence of 1644 and 1646 indicates that he had a work approved for publication. He died sometime in or after 1646. Stephen White was one of the most remarkable Irish scholars of his time. His ability as philosopher and theologian was widely acknowledged in Spain, Germany and France. But his enduring fame rests upon his pioneering work in unearthing the manuscript treasures that preserved so much of the story of Ireland's past. He transcribed manuscripts for the Bollandists, for John Colgan, for James Ussher. Both the latter acknowledged their indebtedness to him. His magnum opus, the “Apologia pro Hibernia”, did not see the light until two centuries after his death but Lynch had a precis of the work before him when he was writing his “Cambrensis Eversus”.
White was the first Irish writer to voice the national tradition which rejected as spurious the grant of Ireland by Pope Adrian IV to Henry II of England. Though his troubles at Ingolstadt gave him the heaven-sent opportunity of turning to historical research, it is to be noted that his contemporary Irish fellow- Jesuits seem to have had no appreciation whatever of his contributions to Irish historical scholarship. Indeed there is plenty of evidence to hand that he was plagued by members of the Irish Mission with invitations to return during his years at Ingolstadt, Dilingen and Pont-à-Mousson. When he returned to Ireland in 1630 he had very probably little facility in speaking either Irish or English after his forty years abroad. The mission itself was unable to furnish him with the library facilities needed for his research work. Yet taking into account all the successes, misunderstandings and disappointments that mark his career, he will always be regarded as the most eminent Irish Jesuit produced in the Old Society. He died at Galway 23 April 1647.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
White, Stephen
by Terry Clavin

White, Stephen (1574?–1646/7), Jesuit priest, academic, and antiquary, was born in Clonmel, the son of Pierce White. His was a remarkable family, two of his brothers also being priests: James was vicar apostolic of Waterford and Lismore and Thomas White (qv), a Jesuit, was the founder of the first Irish college on the continent. Another brother was deposed as mayor of Clonmel in 1606 for refusing to take the oath of supremacy. He was probably educated in the catholic school at Clonmel before travelling to study at the Irish college at Salamanca founded by his brother about 1590. After graduating BA, he entered the Society of Jesus on 13 October 1596 at Villagarcia. He remained at Salamanca, continuing his studies in theology, and obtained a doctorate of divinity about 1605.

In 1602 he taught a one-year course in humanities at Salamanca, marking the start of a distinguished academic career, and followed this up with a three-year course in mental philosophy. Such was his reputation that he was appointed to the chair of scholastic theology in the University of Ingoldstadt, one of the most distinguished universities in Germany, inaugurating his lectureship on 7 January 1606. In 1609 he went to lecture in the University of Dilingen on the Danube, being first professor of scholastic theology, and librarian of the university, and by 1612 confessor of the religious orders. He remained there for fourteen years, becoming one of the most accomplished theologians in Germany. After departing Dilingen he retired from academic life, being confessor to the Germans at Pont-à-Mousson, Champagne (1623–7), and spiritual father at the college of Metz (1627–9).

After 1611 two factors led him towards the study of Irish history. First, there had been little contact between Ireland and continental Europe since the early middle ages; the little that was known about Ireland tended to be from invariably hostile English sources. Second, Scottish antiquarians, capitalising on the fact that prior to the late middle ages the inhabitants of Ireland had been called Scots, claimed the Irish scholars and missionaries, who were a ubiquitous presence across the continent in the early medieval period, as their own. This opportunistic attempt to deprive Ireland of its saints and scholars, and of its best case for being a civilised Christian nation, did not go unchallenged, not least from White. He was aided in his scholarly labours by his academic contacts. Dilingen received students from abbeys and monasteries all over Germany and beyond, facilitating his access to vast reservoirs of ancient manuscripts relating to Ireland.

White wrote his Apologia pro Hibernia adversus Cambri calumnias between 1611 and 1613, declaring ‘The sole purpose of my writing is to defend the injured reputation of the old Irish whom I, and my fathers, for four hundred years have shared a common fatherland.’ He refuted the allegations of the twelfth-century Welsh author Gerald (qv) of Wales whose Expugnatio Hibernica justified the Norman conquest of Ireland through portraying the natives as barbaric and semi-pagan. The Apologia demolished such allegations but was marred slightly by his highly personalised attacks on Gerald. Although White was of Norman ancestry, he identified with the Gaelic Irish. During his career he wrote many works glorifying Ireland's past and refuting the Scots’ claims. He also transcribed a number of manuscripts on the lives of early Irish saints. However, none of his works was published during his lifetime, partly because of a lack of funds but also because of the politically sensitive nature of the material. A generous scholar, he freely shared his writings and discoveries with his contemporaries; others prospered from his unselfish spadework while he remained in comparative obscurity. His knowledge was such that he was accorded the title of ‘polyhistor’, or walking library.

The Irish Jesuits had frequently requested his transfer to Ireland, and in late 1628 he returned to his homeland, after an absence of thirty-eight years, to teach in a Jesuit college just established in Dublin. However, in January 1629 it was suppressed by the government. He returned to his native diocese of Waterford and Lismore, where the teacher who had lectured in some of Europe's most renowned academic institutions spent his autumn years teaching street children. During the late 1630s he was based in Dublin, and at this time embarked on his most celebrated and remarkable antiquarian collaboration. He several times met James Ussher (qv), Church of Ireland primate of Ireland and one of the most brilliant scholars of his age, who shared White's passion for Irish history. Ussher showed him his library and praised his learning. In return White gave Ussher his manuscripts on the lives of the early Irish saints.

After the start of the 1641 rebellion he fled Dublin to settle in Galway city. By then he was too infirm to carry out any more work or to become involved in the turbulent events of the 1640s. While in Galway he met John Lynch (qv), whose Cambrensis eversus was based on White's Apologia. His most likely date of death is shortly after January 1646 but some accounts have him alive in April 1647.

Burgundian Library, Brussels, xxi, nos. 7658–61; The whole works of Sir James Ware concerning Ireland, ed. and trans. W. Harris (1745–6), ii, 103; John Lynch, Cambrensis eversus, ed. Matthew Kelly (Dublin Celtic Society, 1848–52), ii, 394; Stephen White, Apologia pro Hibernia adversus Cambri calumnias, ed. Matthew Kelly (1849); William Reeves, ‘Memoir of Stephen White’, RIA Proc., xiii (1861); DNB; Edmund Hogan, ‘Worthies of Waterford and Tipperary’, Waterford ASJ, iii (1897), 119–34; William Burke, History of Clonmel (1983), 457–64

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father Stephen White 1576-1646
In the estimation of historians and antiquarians, both Catholic and Protestant, Irish and continental, Fr Stephen White was a scholar of the first order. He was a nan of encyclopaedic knowledge, with a bent for antiquities. His contribution to the Annals of the Four Masters and their invaluable help in their compilation is attested warmly and generously by Michael Colgan, the greatest of them.

Born in Clonmel of a family which gave many illustrious sons to the Jesuits, he joined the Society at Villagarcia in 1596, and having pursued a brilliant course in the various continental colleges, professed Philosophy and Theology for many years in Germany and France.

A long wished for project in education, an Irish University, was started in Back Lane Dublin in 1629. Fr Stephen was sent home to profess in it. Its life span was short. For the next ten years Fr White spent most of his time teaching young boys in Waterford.

On the outbreak of the Confederate War he went to Galway, where he died an old man of 72 in 1646.

His works include : “Apologia pro Hibernia’, “Geste Dei”, “De Sanctis et Antiquitate Hiberniae” together with numerous philosophical and theological tracts. A great deal of these works are lost, indeed were never published through fear of exacerbating the English authorities.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
WHITE, STEPHEN. This Irish Father deserves a fuller eulogium than I am able to supply. He was the author of some historical pieces relating to Ireland, in confutation of the assertions of Giraldus Cambrensis. The Rev. John Lynch, who had the custody of this valuable MS mentions it in Chapter I and XIV of his “Cambrensis Evcrsus”, printed in 1662, and expresses his deep regret that a considerable part of it was lost during the Civil Wars. Archbishop Usher, an excellent judge of these matters, in p. 400 of his Primordia, gives F. White the character of being “a man of exquisite knowledge in the Antiquities, not only of Ireland, but also of other nations”. In a letter of F. Robert Nugent, Superior of his brethren in Ireland, and addressed from Kilkenny, the 10th of January, 1646, to F. Charles Sangri, I read what follows.
“I have given the commission to four of our Fathers diligently to examine the works of F. Stephen White, and to forward their judgment to your paternity, conformably to the directions you have recently sent us. His works are various, and as our Fathers live in places very distant from each other, and notwithstanding the most Reverend Bishops, (who are ready to defray the expenses of the printing), as also the supreme Council very earnestly insist, that a certain work of his, “De sanctis et Antiqititate Ibcrniae” be instantly sent to the Press, I find it difficult and next to impossible to resist their reasonable demand, since the Manuscript itself has been perused by several them, and has been pronounced not only worthy of being printed, but highly necessary for the credit and advantage of this Kingdom. Therefore I have written again to the Examiners, that each would privately report their opinion on this work as soon as possible to your Paternity; though all in their letters to me greatly extol it, and declare it most worthy to issue from the Press. But 1 am unwilling to allow any work to be printed that can give just cause of offence to any person : and yet there is less cause of apprehension in this case, as this book merely treats on the Saints and Antiquity of the Kingdom of Ireland”.

Wright, Matthew, 1647-1711, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2271
  • Person
  • 20 September 1647-22 August 1711

Born: 20 September 1647, Madrid, Spain
Entered: 18 February 1668, Watten, Belgium - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained: 09 April 1678
Died: 22 August 1711, Dunkirk, Hauts-de-France, France - Angliae Province (ANG)

Son of Sir Benjamin and Jane (Williams) of Cranham Hall, Essex

◆ Came with three others (Charles Petre, Joseph Plowden and Andrew Poulton) under former ANG Provincial, John Warner, in 1689-1690 and was a Missioner in Ireland, Fr Warner as Confessor, the others in schools, and preaching in the country
(Cousin of Charles Petre??)

◆ The English Jesuits 1650-1829 Geoffrey Holt SJ : Catholic Record Society 1984
1684-1687 St Omer
1689-1690 Ireland
1691-1692 Ghent

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
WRIGHT, MATTHEW, admitted on the 18th of February, 1668: was rector of Watten from 1694 to 1698 : occurs Prefect of Studies at St. Omer s College in 1704 : for the Four last years of his life was Rector of Ghent, but actually died at Dunkirk, on the 22nd of August, 1711, aet. 64.

Young, John, 1589-1664, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/2275
  • Person
  • 15 August 1589-13 July 1664

Born: 15 August 1589, Cashel, County Tipperary
Entered: 13 May 1610, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained: 1621, Louvain, Belgium
Final Vows: 14 July 1633
Died: 13 July 1664, Irish College, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

Had studied Rhetoric before Entry then at Douai and Louvain
1655 In Irish College Rome (Fr Ferri being Rector)
1656-1660 Rector Irish College Rome (Bellarmino and Philip Roche are Consultors)
1662 John Young and William St Leger ask and obtain a papal indulgence for 100 Irish Jesuits (Arch Ir Col Rom XXVI 6)
Taught Humanities, Greek was Preacher, Superior, Master of Novices and Tertian Instructor
He wrote “Relationem de Civitate Corcagie et de Civicate Kilkennie” and “Libros Tres Militia Evangelicae” and “Vitam St Patrick Apostoli” and many other books.
His portrait was published in 1793 by William Richardson, Castle St, Leinster Sq, London

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Robert Yong and Beatrice née Sall or Sallan (Sallanus)
Studied Humanities in Flanders before Ent, and then in the Society two years Philosophy and four years Theology.
1624 Sent to Ireland. He knew Latin, Greek, Irish, English, French and some Italian.
He taught Humanities and Greek for eight years; Preacher and Confessor for thirty years; Director of BVM Sodality twenty years; Superior of various Residences eighteen years; Master of Novices at Kilkenny and Galway five years; Consultor of Mission five years; Vice-Superior of Mission one year. (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI) also Master of Tertians
He devoted himself to the Irish Mission for thirty years, chiefly in Cork, Waterford and Galway. During the persecution, he frequently went to people’s houses disguised as a miller.
He laid the foundation for the Novitiate at Waterford (should be Kilkenny?). He had to move this Novitiate to Galway, on account of the advance of the rebel Parliamentary forces, and was soon compelled to go with his novices to Europe.
He was then made Rector of the Irish College in Rome, and he was in office for eight years, and died in Rome 13 July 1664 aged 75 (Tanners “Confessors SJ”)
Several of his letters are extant and interesting. Several to Fr General dated Kilkenny, 30 January 1647, 30 June 1648, 31 December 1648, 08 February 1649, 22 June 1649 describe the situation relating to the history of this period. Later there are two letters from Galway to Fr General, 20 April 1650 and 14 August 1650 (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS).
A Writer; A very holy Priest; He took a Vow to observe the Rules.
Mercure Verdier (Irish Mission Visitor reporting in 1649) described him as “a distinguished Preacher, and remarkable for every species of religious virtue”
Father General ordered his portrait to be taken after death and his panegyric to be preached in the Roman College

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Robert and Beatrice née Sall
Had made his classical education in Flanders before Ent 13 May 1610 Rome
1612-1617 After First Vows, because of ill health, he was sent to Belgium and Courtray (Kortrijk) for Regency where he taught Greek.
1617-1621 He was then sent for Philosophy at Antwerp and Theology at Louvain where he was Ordained 1621.
1621 Sent to Ireland and Cashel, Clonmel and Kilkenny - to the great regret of Lessius who had wanted him appointed as a Chair in Philosophy - where he devoted himself to teaching young people and giving missions.
For many years he was Superior at the Cork Residence
When the Novitiate opened in Kilkenny he was appointed Novice Master
1646-1647 During the inter-regnum that followed the resignation of Robert Nugent as Mission Superior he acted as Vice-Superior of the Irish Mission
1651-1656 When the invasion of Cromwell resulted in the closure of the Novitiate he went back to Rome, initially as Procurator of the Irish Mission (1651) and then sent as Spiritual Father of the Irish College (1652-1656) as well as Tertian Instructor in Romanae Province (ROM)
1656 Rector of Irish College Rome 24 February 1656 where he remained until he died in Office 13 July 1664
He died with the reputation of a Saint. Wonderful stories were told of the favours he received from God in prayer, and information as to his virtues was gathered in Ireland and forwarded to Rome as if it was intended to prepare his cause for beatification.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ The Irish Jesuits Vol 1 1962
John Young (1646-1647)
John Young, son of Robert Young and Beatrice Sall, was born at Cashel on 15th August, 1589. Having finished his classical studies in Flanders, he entered the Novitiate of Sant' Andrea in Rome on 13th May, 1610, but had to return to Belgium two years later on account of ill-health. In Belgium he taught Greek at Courtray, studied philosophy at Antwerp and theology at Louvain and distinguished himself so much that it was with great regret that Fr Leonard Lessius, who hoped to have him appointed to a chair of philosophy, learned that he was ordered to Ireland. Returning home in 1621, he devoted himself to the instruction of youth, and worked as a missioner in Cashel, Clonmel, and Kilkenny, and was for many years Superior of the Cork Residence. He was admitted to the solemn profession of four vows on 14th July, 1633. When the Novitiate was opened at Kilkenny he was appointed Master of Novices, and during the interregnum that followed the resignation of Fr Robert Nugent he acted as Vice-Superior of the Mission (1646-47). When the triumph of the Cromwellian arms dispersed the noviceship he was sent as Procurator of the Mission to Rome (1651). At Rome he was made Consultor and Spiritual Father of the Irish College (1652-56), and Instructor of the Tertians of the Roman Province. He became Rector of the Irish College on 24th February, 1656, and continued in that office till his death on 13th July, 1664. He died with the reputation of a saint. Wonderful stories were told of the favours he received from God in prayer,
and information as to his virtues was gathered in Ireland and forwarded to Rome, as if it was intended to prepare his cause for beatification.

◆ James B Stephenson SJ Menologies 1973
Father John Young 1589-1664
Fr John Yonge or Young was born in Cashel in 1589. He was the son of Robert Yonge and Beatrice Sall, being thus on his mother’s side a relative of the two Jesuits Andrew and James Sall. He became a Jesuit in Rome in 1610.

He was an accomplished linguist, numbering Latin, Greek, Irish, English, French and Italian among his languages. He taught Humanities for eight years and was a preacher and confessor for thirty, Director of the Sodality of Our Lady for twenty, Superior in various houses for eighteen, Master of Novices for five, Consultor of the Mission for five and Vice-Superior of the Mission for one year.

He laboured mainly in Cork, Waterford, Kilkenny and Galway. It was he who founded the noviceship in Kilkenny, reporting in 1647 that he had eleven novices, of whom four were priests, six were scholastics and one brother.

He used often penetrate into the houses of Catholics at the height of the persecution disguised as a miller. For him we are indebted for may letters on the state of the Mission. He also wrote a life of St Patrick.

In 1649 he was forced to move the novices to Galway and thence to the continent. He became Rector of the Irish College at Rome for eight years and finally died in 164 with the reputation of a saint and a thaumaturgus.

◆ George Oliver Towards Illustrating the Biography of the Scotch, English and Irish Members SJ
YOUNG, JOHN. For thirty years this apostolic man devoted himself to the Irish Mission. The Counties of Cork, Waterford, and Galway, were the principal theatres of his labours. We learn from p.871 of Tanner’s Lives of the Confessors of the Society of Jesus, that this good Father frequently contrived, during the rage of persecution, to penetrate into the houses of the Catholics, in the disguise of a Miller. His spirit of discretion and experience, his eminence as a Preacher, his profound learning, his solid interior virtue, recommended him as the fittest person amongst his Brethren to lay the foundation of the Novitiate at Kilkenny; and no wonder, that under so great a master of Spiritual life, such Ornaments to their Country and Luminaries of Religion as FF. Stephen Rice, William Ryan, &c. &c. should have come forth. Pere Verdier reported him in 1649, to the General of the Order, as “Vir omnium Religiosarum virtutum genere insignis, et concionator egregius”. Obliged by the successful advance of the Parliamentary forces to remove his interesting Establishment from Kilkenny, he conducted it to the Town of Galway; but thence also he was compelled to emigrate with them to the Continent, where he saw himself under the necessity of drafting these dear children in various houses of the Society. Retiring to Rome, he presided over the Irish College there for eight years, and was rewarded with a happy death in that City, on the 13th of July, 1664, aet. 75, as I find it written under his beautifully engraved Portrait. A few original letters of this meritorious and saintly Father are still extant : some Extracts may afford pleasure to the reader.

  1. Dated from Kilkenny, the 30th of January, 1647 OS.
    “Our long expected Superior, P. Malone, by the blessing of God, is at last arrived. His coming was indeed welcomed by all; but, above all, by me, who have been sustaining the double burthen of the Novitiate and the Mission. Now, blessed be God, I am relieved of the care of superintending the Mission. With regard to the Novitiate, we have eleven Novices, of whom four are Priests, six are Scholastics, and one a Temporal Coadjutor. Domestic discipline and regular observance proceed in due course, as I flatter myself. I do trust in the Lord, that they will not degenerate from the primitive spirit of our Fathers. They are trained in the simplicity of obedience, in the despising of themselves and the World, in subduing their passions, renouncing self-will, in the practise of poverty, in the candid and unreserved manifestation of Conscience, in inward conversation and familiarity with God : and of these things, praise be to God, they are very capable and most eager. Nothing is omitted which the Rules prescribe for their formation in the spirit of the Society of Jesus”.

The 2nd is dated from Kilkenny, the 30th of June, 1618.
“The letters of your Rev. Paternity, bearing date the 24th of August, 1647, did not reach me until the 23rd of last month. Never since the memory of man have the affairs of this kingdom been in a more turbulent state than at present, by reason of the discord now prevailing between the Supreme Council and the Nuncio”.
He then states that the Supreme Council, in consequence of severe reverses of fortune during the Campaign, and the great want of ways and means, had concluded a Treaty for six months with Inchinquin, the General of the Enemy’s forces : that some of the Conditions were judged unfavourable to Ecclesiastical rights by the Nuncio, who signified his utter disapprobation, and threatened an interdict, unless the Truce was recalled within the space of nine days; that the Supreme Council appealed to the Holy See; but notwithstanding such appeal, the Nuncio had proceeded to carry his threat into execution; and that confusion and the worst species of civil hostilities were engendered between the parties.

In this and other letters, dated from Kilkenny, the 31st of December, 1648, the 8th of February, 1649, the 22nd of June, 1649, he enters into many details relating to the history of this sad and eventful period, and gives proof of his own quiet and meek spirit, of his tender regard for Charity and the interests of Religion.

From Galway the Rev. Father addressed two letters to the Gen. Piccolimini.

The first is dated the 20th of April, 1650 : he remarks on the bright prospect there was for the Irish Mission of the Society in Ireland but seven years ago; what a wide field was opened for extending the glory of God, and procuring the salvation of souls; that several cities had petitioned for Colleges of the Order, and that competent foundations* had been offered and some accepted; that the small number of labourers for such an abundant harvest of souls (for they hardly amounted to sixty for the whole of Ireland, nam vix sexayinta in toto regno fuimus) induced them to apply for powers to admit Novices at home, who being instructed in virtue and afterwards in learning, might succeed us, most of whom are advanced in years, in the work of the Ministry. The necessary permission was obtained; it was confirmed and increased afterwards, and the Novitiate had prosperously maintained its course during the last four years “et Novitiatus hoc quadriennio prosper suum cursum tenuit”. But as nothing is stable in human affairs, during the last year the Establishment was disturbed by the din of arms and by the assault of the Parliamentary forces, insomuch that a transmigration to Galway had become necessary. Every day the political horizon grew darker, and the panic and despair of the confederated Chiefs portended the worst consequences to the Country. He adds, “For the more advanced of our Brethren we are not so concerned; for they are prepared by age and the long exercise of virtues to meet the brunt and storm of Persecution : but for the Juniors, as for so many unfledged young from the hovering Kite, we are all solicitude”. After earnestly consulting Almighty God, and deliberating with the Fathers of Galway and its neighbourhood, he states, that it was unanimously resolved to send the young men abroad as soon as possible, trusting in God and in the accustomed charity of the Society, that provision would be made for them. He finishes by saying, “My bowels are moved with the danger impending on those whom I have begotten in Christ; for, as their Master of Novices, I have brought them forth with the anxiety of a mother. I now commend and commit them to your Rev. Paternity, that they may be distributed and accepted through the Provinces; hear, I implore you, my good Father, this first petition of their very poor Mother; I do not say, my Petition; but of this declining Mission; because Satan waxes fierce and cruel, intent on extinguishing the spark which is left, and on leaving us no name or remainder upon the earth”. (2 Kings, xiv. 70.)

The second letter is dated the 14th of August, 1650. After briefly adverting to the successes of the Puritan Factions, and the atrocities and sacrileges which marked their triumphant progress, he says, that he will take the first safe opportunity of shipping off his dear Novices to the Continent, and conjures the General to exercise his tender charity towards these interesting Exiles.

  • Amongst these benefactors (we have already noticed the greatest, Elizabeth Nugent, Countess of Kildare, who died on the 26th of October, 1645) we must particularize Dr. Thomas Dease, Bishop of Meath; Mr. Edmund Kirwan and his relation Francis Kirwan, Bishop of Killala (his Lordship had obtained to be admitted into the Society “pro hora mortis”, and was buried in the Jesuits Church at Rennes); and Thomas Walsh, Archbishop of Cashell, who died in exile at Compostella. The Supreme Council had also engaged in 1645. to erect a new University, to be under the charge of the Jesuits, as also to found a College under the name of Jesus.