Showing 434 results

Name
Corporate body

Allied Irish Bank, 1966-

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-

Allied Irish Banks Limited was formed in 1966 as a new company that acquired three Irish banks: Provincial Bank of Ireland, the Royal Bank of Ireland, and the Munster & Leinster Bank.

An Post, 1984-

  • Corporate body
  • 1984-

An Post is the state-owned provider of postal services in the Republic of Ireland. Previous to 1984, known as Department of Posts and Telegraphs (P&T, P+T and P⁊T), 1924-1984.

Australian Vice-Province of the Society of Jesus, 1931-

  • IE IJA MSSN/AUST
  • Corporate body
  • 1931-

The first Jesuits to set foot in Australia, Fr Aloysius Kranewitter SJ and Fr Maximilian Klinkowstroem SJ, came from Austria. They arrived in Adelaide in 1848. In 1853, a property was bought near Clare. Fr Kranewitter named it Sevenhill.

Two Irish Jesuits established a community in Melbourne in 1865, and three more Austrians and one of the first native-born Australians to become a Jesuit established a community in Darwin in 1882.

The Australian Province was formally established in 1950, with Fr Austin Kelly SJ its first Provincial, having being a Vice-Province in 1931.

BBC, 1922-

  • Corporate body
  • 1922-

Belvedere College SJ, Dublin, 1832-

  • IE IJA SC/BELV
  • Corporate body
  • 1832-

After the restoration of the Society of Jesus in 1814, a Jesuit community took over the vacant Poor Clare convent in Hardwicke Street, Dublin. The establishment of St. Francis Xavier’s Church, Upper Gardiner Street in 1832 provided the Jesuits with the premises necessary to establish a school. St. Francis College was established at Hardwicke Street in 1832 however it proved to be too small for this emerging school. New premises were needed and Belvedere House, Great Denmark Street was bought in 1841. The Jesuits at Belvedere remained part of the Gardiner Street community until 1842, with total independence in 1847.

John Curtis, Superior (at Gardiner Street, 1841;
Charles Ferguson, Rector, 1845;
Patrick Meagher, Vice-Rector, 1 January 1846;
Patrick Meagher, Rector, 14 March 1847;
John Ffrench, Rector, 30 November 1855;
Francis Murphy, Rector, 24 June 1856;
Michael O'Ferrall, Rector, 31 July 1858;
Matthew Seaver, Rector, 10 October 1861;
Edward Kelly, Rector, 2 August 1864;
Joseph Lentaigne, Rector, 18 August 1872;
John Matthews, Rector, 7 August 1873;
James Dalton, Minister
Thomas Kelly, Minister, 28 February 1879;
Edmund Donovan, Vice-Rector, 5 October 1882;
Thomas Finlay, Rector, 23 June 1883
James Cullen, Vice-Rector, 14 July 1888;
Matthew Devitt, Vice-Rector, 31 July 1889;
Matthew Devitt, Rector, 8 September 1890;
Thomas Wheeler, Rector, 31 July 1891;
Henry William, Vice-Rector, 15 August 1894;
Henry William, Rector, 28 August 1895;
Nicholas Tomkin, Rector, 29 June 1900;
James Brennan, Rector, 21 August 1908;
John Fahy, Rector, 30 July 1913;
Charles Doyle, Rector, 27 July 1919;
Michael Quinlan, Rector, 30 July 1922;
John Coyne, Rector, 29 October 1928;
Patrick Morris, Rector, 14 February 1931;
John O'Connor, Rector, 16 June 1936;
James Gubbins, Rector, 29 July 1942;
Denis P Kennedy, Vice-Rector, 30 July 1945;
Denis P Kennedy, Rector, 2 June 1947;
Redmond Roche, Rector, 30 July 1953;
Francis McDonagh, Rector, 24 June 1959;
Henry Nolan, Rector, 2 August 1965;
John Kerr, Rector, 31 July 1968;

Chikuni Mission

  • Corporate body
  • 1905

Founded by a French Jesuit, Joseph Moreau, in 1905. From its beginning, it has a some form of school at its core.

See: Carmody, Brendan. "Secular and Sacred at Chikuni: 1905-1940." Journal of Religion in Africa 21, no. 2 (1991): 130-48.

Clongowes Wood College SJ, County Kildare, 1814-

  • IE IJA SC/CLON
  • Corporate body
  • 1814-

Clongowes Wood College was bought by the Jesuits in 1814 at the cost of £16,000. In 1886, the Jesuit-run St. Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, county Offaly, was amalgamated with Clongowes Wood College. The school is dedicated to St. Aloysius of Gonzaga and is twinned with Portora Royal School, Enniskillen.

Coláiste Iognáid SJ, 1862-

  • IE IJA SC/GALW
  • Corporate body
  • 1862-

Since 1620 the Jesuits have, with some involuntary intermissions, been working in Galway. In 1645 our first school was founded through the generosity of Edmund Kirwan. The school, incorporated it seems into a Jesuit residence in the present Abbeygate St, survived and flourished although it had been established at a time of political upheaval and military activity. After the surrender of Galway to the Cromwellian forces in 1652, the Jesuits tried to maintain contact with the people of the area, and there is reference in 1658 to three members of the Society living secretly in County Galway. Jesuits returned openly to Galway after the Restoration of Charles II, but were banished again by Williamite forces in 1691. Once more they made a comeback in 1728 and for forty years they worked among the people of Galway. Sadly, a decrease in manpower forced the withdrawal of the “Mission” in 1768.

In 1859, at the request of the Bishop, members of the Order once more took up residence in the city, this time in Prospect Hill and served in St Patrick’s Church. Within a year they had opened a college near the site of the present Bank of Ireland at 19 Eyre Square. The college’s present location on Sea Road dates from 1863. The modern phase of Coláiste Iognáid began in 1929. The local enthusiasm for the language revival efforts of the emerging State was to be served by a re-invigorated Coláiste Iognáid, which became an Irish-medium School in 1931.

The college now is a co-educational, bilingual, non-fee-paying secondary school.

Crescent College Comprehensive SJ, 1859-

  • IE IJA SC/CRES
  • Corporate body
  • 1859-

The first Jesuit school in Limerick was founded by Father David Wolfe SJ (1528-c.1578) in 1565. Over the next three hundred years, the Jesuits presence in Limerick ebbed and flowed. By 1640, a Jesuit residence was established at Castle Lane and by 1672, a school was opened near St Mary’s Cathedral. After an interval of eighty-six years from the Suppression of the Society in 1773, the Jesuits returned to Limerick in 1859 after Bishop John Ryan (1784-1864) had invited the Society to establish a school in the city. The school initially opened in 1859 as St. Munchin’s College on Hartstonge Street. The pioneer Jesuit community in 1859 were Frs. Edward Kelly (1824-1905) (Rector), Thomas Kelly (1829-1898), Peter Foley (1826-1893), Edmund Hogan (1831-1917), Matthew Saurin (1825-1901) and one scholastic, Mr. Matthew Russell (1834-1912). In January 1862, the Jesuits purchased a neighbouring residence, Crescent House. The church building was started in 1864, opened in 1868 and named after the Sacred Heart in 1869. The college had ceased to be a seminary for the diocese in 1867 and was renamed the Sacred Heart College in 1873. Commonly known as the Crescent College, it ceased to be a fee paying school in 1971 and became the Crescent College Comprehensive SJ. In 1973 the Comprehensive moved to a modern greenfield site at Dooradoyle. Later it became a co-educational school and the Crescent Preparatory School was closed in 1976.

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